Atletica

Le foto delle discipline dell'atletica

Lake Illawarra Little Athletics Centre Inc January Carnival

FILE PHOTO: World Athletics Championships

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - World Athletics Championships – women's high jump final – London Stadium, London, Britain – August 12, 2017 – Ruth Beitia of Spain competes. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - Women's High Jump Final

FILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Women's High Jump Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 20/08/2016. Ruth Beitia (ESP) of Spain celebrates after winning gold REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - Women's High Jump Final

FILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Women's High Jump Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 20/08/2016. Ruth Beitia (ESP) of Spain celebrates after winning gold REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado

FILE PHOTO: World Athletics Championships

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - World Athletics Championships – women's high jump final – London Stadium, London, Britain – August 12, 2017 – Ruth Beitia of Spain competes. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - Women's High Jump Final

FILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Women's High Jump Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 20/08/2016. Ruth Beitia (ESP) of Spain celebrates after winning gold REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado

Athletics - IAAF Athletics Diamond League meeting

Athletics - IAAF Athletics Diamond League meeting Zurich - Letzigrund stadium, Zurich, Switzerland - 1/9/2016 - Ruth Beitia of Spain comeptes in the high jump women. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann Picture Supplied by Action Images

Speeding ahead: is the Richard Mille Alain Prost watch the ultimate luxury cycling accessory? 

Given French-born watchmaker Richard Mille’s predilection for all things automotive and his company’s relentless A-list matchmaking, perhaps the biggest surprise of the new £655,000 RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is that it’s taken Mille 18 years to bring France’s only F1 world champion into the family. The second is that that the watch is not inspired by Prost’s record-breaking career in Grand Prix Motor racing (he won four world championships between 1985 and 1994 with McLaren and then Williams) but by cycling. Prost already had won three world titles when he first got on a bike in 1993, having been fired from Ferrari the year before. Cycling was a way to keep himself in shape during the subsequent sabbatical year. He would go on to win that fourth title 1994 with the Williams team. The striking watch The largest watch Richard Mille have yet made, the asymmetric RM70-01 features compound curves and is razor slim. Mille is an advocate of wearing watches on the right and not the left arm to better keep the crown wheel from making contact with the wrist, and the RM70-01 is specifically designed be worn on the right with the crown nearer the elbow; so less likely to dig in when a rider hunkers down behind his or her drop-downs. It’s notionally more aerodynamic this way also - the shape was pioneered on the RM61-01 developed with Jamaican sprinter Johan Blake, but of course what it really is, like all Mille’s celebrity pieces, is a kind of narrative. The unveiling of the timepiece at Le Castellet race track, France Credit: Antonin Vincent The Prost’s own distinct complication is an "odometer" where keen cyclists can manually enter their daily mileages (originally logged no doubt on their Apple-watch enabled Strava app). The mechanism is borrowed from the Erotic Tourbillon of 2015, the first watch in the world to talk filth to its owners, the so-called RM69. Glibness aside, the construction of the RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is, of course a thing of wonder with a case that’s milled from a solid chunk of TPT - so called "forged carbon" with an entirely natural grain.  It’s nearly 55mm, nearly 50mm wide and 18mm deep, although that does now allow for the signature Mille "tonneau" curve. The titanium tourbillon is manually wound and has a power reserve of 70 hour. It sits just below the odometer on a frame designed to evoke the skeleton on a bicycle. The watch comes with its own bicycle  Credit:  Antonin Vincent And indeed "The Prost" comes with its own bicycle, a gift from the company to the 30 buyers of the strictly limited piece - a carbon fibre Colnago C-60, complete with carbon wheels and the company’s own electronically-actuated groupset, and worth around £10,000. Cycling joins motorsport, tennis, golf, athletics, polo and skiing on the roster of Mille’s personal sporting fascinations brought to life and brought to market via technologically innovative watches; the shock-proof Tourbillon technology in the Prost watch first saw the light of day in 2014 in the RM38 -01 developed with golfer Bubba Watson which featured a g-sensor capable of measuring up to 20g of swing. A later piece, the RM35-02 developed with Rafa Nadal is said to be capable of withstanding 10,000g. On a bike that’s one hell of a big accident, ensuring the watch mechanism would survive you, a notion that’s slight antithetical to Mille’s forward looking, YOLO approach but yet another talking point on a mesmerising masterpiece from the king of content-rich, micro-mechanical super-bling. richardmille.com

Speeding ahead: is the Richard Mille Alain Prost watch the ultimate luxury cycling accessory? 

Given French-born watchmaker Richard Mille’s predilection for all things automotive and his company’s relentless A-list matchmaking, perhaps the biggest surprise of the new £655,000 RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is that it’s taken Mille 18 years to bring France’s only F1 world champion into the family. The second is that that the watch is not inspired by Prost’s record-breaking career in Grand Prix Motor racing (he won four world championships between 1985 and 1994 with McLaren and then Williams) but by cycling. Prost already had won three world titles when he first got on a bike in 1993, having been fired from Ferrari the year before. Cycling was a way to keep himself in shape during the subsequent sabbatical year. He would go on to win that fourth title 1994 with the Williams team. The striking watch The largest watch Richard Mille have yet made, the asymmetric RM70-01 features compound curves and is razor slim. Mille is an advocate of wearing watches on the right and not the left arm to better keep the crown wheel from making contact with the wrist, and the RM70-01 is specifically designed be worn on the right with the crown nearer the elbow; so less likely to dig in when a rider hunkers down behind his or her drop-downs. It’s notionally more aerodynamic this way also - the shape was pioneered on the RM61-01 developed with Jamaican sprinter Johan Blake, but of course what it really is, like all Mille’s celebrity pieces, is a kind of narrative. The unveiling of the timepiece at Le Castellet race track, France Credit: Antonin Vincent The Prost’s own distinct complication is an "odometer" where keen cyclists can manually enter their daily mileages (originally logged no doubt on their Apple-watch enabled Strava app). The mechanism is borrowed from the Erotic Tourbillon of 2015, the first watch in the world to talk filth to its owners, the so-called RM69. Glibness aside, the construction of the RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is, of course a thing of wonder with a case that’s milled from a solid chunk of TPT - so called "forged carbon" with an entirely natural grain.  It’s nearly 55mm, nearly 50mm wide and 18mm deep, although that does now allow for the signature Mille "tonneau" curve. The titanium tourbillon is manually wound and has a power reserve of 70 hour. It sits just below the odometer on a frame designed to evoke the skeleton on a bicycle. The watch comes with its own bicycle  Credit:  Antonin Vincent And indeed "The Prost" comes with its own bicycle, a gift from the company to the 30 buyers of the strictly limited piece - a carbon fibre Colnago C-60, complete with carbon wheels and the company’s own electronically-actuated groupset, and worth around £10,000. Cycling joins motorsport, tennis, golf, athletics, polo and skiing on the roster of Mille’s personal sporting fascinations brought to life and brought to market via technologically innovative watches; the shock-proof Tourbillon technology in the Prost watch first saw the light of day in 2014 in the RM38 -01 developed with golfer Bubba Watson which featured a g-sensor capable of measuring up to 20g of swing. A later piece, the RM35-02 developed with Rafa Nadal is said to be capable of withstanding 10,000g. On a bike that’s one hell of a big accident, ensuring the watch mechanism would survive you, a notion that’s slight antithetical to Mille’s forward looking, YOLO approach but yet another talking point on a mesmerising masterpiece from the king of content-rich, micro-mechanical super-bling. richardmille.com

Speeding ahead: is the Richard Mille Alain Prost watch the ultimate luxury cycling accessory? 

Given French-born watchmaker Richard Mille’s predilection for all things automotive and his company’s relentless A-list matchmaking, perhaps the biggest surprise of the new £655,000 RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is that it’s taken Mille 18 years to bring France’s only F1 world champion into the family. The second is that that the watch is not inspired by Prost’s record-breaking career in Grand Prix Motor racing (he won four world championships between 1985 and 1994 with McLaren and then Williams) but by cycling. Prost already had won three world titles when he first got on a bike in 1993, having been fired from Ferrari the year before. Cycling was a way to keep himself in shape during the subsequent sabbatical year. He would go on to win that fourth title 1994 with the Williams team. The striking watch The largest watch Richard Mille have yet made, the asymmetric RM70-01 features compound curves and is razor slim. Mille is an advocate of wearing watches on the right and not the left arm to better keep the crown wheel from making contact with the wrist, and the RM70-01 is specifically designed be worn on the right with the crown nearer the elbow; so less likely to dig in when a rider hunkers down behind his or her drop-downs. It’s notionally more aerodynamic this way also - the shape was pioneered on the RM61-01 developed with Jamaican sprinter Johan Blake, but of course what it really is, like all Mille’s celebrity pieces, is a kind of narrative. The unveiling of the timepiece at Le Castellet race track, France Credit: Antonin Vincent The Prost’s own distinct complication is an "odometer" where keen cyclists can manually enter their daily mileages (originally logged no doubt on their Apple-watch enabled Strava app). The mechanism is borrowed from the Erotic Tourbillon of 2015, the first watch in the world to talk filth to its owners, the so-called RM69. Glibness aside, the construction of the RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is, of course a thing of wonder with a case that’s milled from a solid chunk of TPT - so called "forged carbon" with an entirely natural grain.  It’s nearly 55mm, nearly 50mm wide and 18mm deep, although that does now allow for the signature Mille "tonneau" curve. The titanium tourbillon is manually wound and has a power reserve of 70 hour. It sits just below the odometer on a frame designed to evoke the skeleton on a bicycle. The watch comes with its own bicycle  Credit:  Antonin Vincent And indeed "The Prost" comes with its own bicycle, a gift from the company to the 30 buyers of the strictly limited piece - a carbon fibre Colnago C-60, complete with carbon wheels and the company’s own electronically-actuated groupset, and worth around £10,000. Cycling joins motorsport, tennis, golf, athletics, polo and skiing on the roster of Mille’s personal sporting fascinations brought to life and brought to market via technologically innovative watches; the shock-proof Tourbillon technology in the Prost watch first saw the light of day in 2014 in the RM38 -01 developed with golfer Bubba Watson which featured a g-sensor capable of measuring up to 20g of swing. A later piece, the RM35-02 developed with Rafa Nadal is said to be capable of withstanding 10,000g. On a bike that’s one hell of a big accident, ensuring the watch mechanism would survive you, a notion that’s slight antithetical to Mille’s forward looking, YOLO approach but yet another talking point on a mesmerising masterpiece from the king of content-rich, micro-mechanical super-bling. richardmille.com

Speeding ahead: is the Richard Mille Alain Prost watch the ultimate luxury cycling accessory? 

Given French-born watchmaker Richard Mille’s predilection for all things automotive and his company’s relentless A-list matchmaking, perhaps the biggest surprise of the new £655,000 RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is that it’s taken Mille 18 years to bring France’s only F1 world champion into the family. The second is that that the watch is not inspired by Prost’s record-breaking career in Grand Prix Motor racing (he won four world championships between 1985 and 1994 with McLaren and then Williams) but by cycling. Prost already had won three world titles when he first got on a bike in 1993, having been fired from Ferrari the year before. Cycling was a way to keep himself in shape during the subsequent sabbatical year. He would go on to win that fourth title 1994 with the Williams team. The striking watch The largest watch Richard Mille have yet made, the asymmetric RM70-01 features compound curves and is razor slim. Mille is an advocate of wearing watches on the right and not the left arm to better keep the crown wheel from making contact with the wrist, and the RM70-01 is specifically designed be worn on the right with the crown nearer the elbow; so less likely to dig in when a rider hunkers down behind his or her drop-downs. It’s notionally more aerodynamic this way also - the shape was pioneered on the RM61-01 developed with Jamaican sprinter Johan Blake, but of course what it really is, like all Mille’s celebrity pieces, is a kind of narrative. The unveiling of the timepiece at Le Castellet race track, France Credit: Antonin Vincent The Prost’s own distinct complication is an "odometer" where keen cyclists can manually enter their daily mileages (originally logged no doubt on their Apple-watch enabled Strava app). The mechanism is borrowed from the Erotic Tourbillon of 2015, the first watch in the world to talk filth to its owners, the so-called RM69. Glibness aside, the construction of the RM70-01 Tourbillon Alain Prost is, of course a thing of wonder with a case that’s milled from a solid chunk of TPT - so called "forged carbon" with an entirely natural grain.  It’s nearly 55mm, nearly 50mm wide and 18mm deep, although that does now allow for the signature Mille "tonneau" curve. The titanium tourbillon is manually wound and has a power reserve of 70 hour. It sits just below the odometer on a frame designed to evoke the skeleton on a bicycle. The watch comes with its own bicycle  Credit:  Antonin Vincent And indeed "The Prost" comes with its own bicycle, a gift from the company to the 30 buyers of the strictly limited piece - a carbon fibre Colnago C-60, complete with carbon wheels and the company’s own electronically-actuated groupset, and worth around £10,000. Cycling joins motorsport, tennis, golf, athletics, polo and skiing on the roster of Mille’s personal sporting fascinations brought to life and brought to market via technologically innovative watches; the shock-proof Tourbillon technology in the Prost watch first saw the light of day in 2014 in the RM38 -01 developed with golfer Bubba Watson which featured a g-sensor capable of measuring up to 20g of swing. A later piece, the RM35-02 developed with Rafa Nadal is said to be capable of withstanding 10,000g. On a bike that’s one hell of a big accident, ensuring the watch mechanism would survive you, a notion that’s slight antithetical to Mille’s forward looking, YOLO approach but yet another talking point on a mesmerising masterpiece from the king of content-rich, micro-mechanical super-bling. richardmille.com

Vipers strike at All-Schools (video)

The State All-school athletics Championships has been a great success for the Armidale Vipers club. They continue to branch out into other disciplines following the success of steeplechase in the club.

Vipers strike at All-Schools (video)

The State All-school athletics Championships has been a great success for the Armidale Vipers club. They continue to branch out into other disciplines following the success of steeplechase in the club.

Benz: UofL Athletics is an economic giver

NCAA definition of Self-Supporting doesn't tell the story of UL Athletic Association's Contribution to UofL

Report: Rick Pitino Files Lawsuit Against Adidas

Former Louisville head coach Rick Pitino has filed lawsuits against Adidas America, Inc. and Adidas North America, Inc. claiming damages caused by the company's bribing of recruits, reports ESPN's Jay Bilas.

The crux of Pitino's lawsuit is the coach's assertion that he had no knowledge of Adidas' alleged bribes, and the their corrupt activity resulted in his firing, which was made official Monday.

Last month, the F.B.I. announced that 10 individuals—including four assistant coaches for Division I programs—had been arrested after a two-year probe revealed rampant corruption and bribery in recruiting practices. No individual coach at Louisville was named in the F.B.I.'s findings, but the university is mentioned in a complaint against Jim Gatto, the former head of global sports marketing for Adidas basketball.

In an affidavit submitted to Louisville's board in a meeting on Monday to discuss his firing, Pitino said, per ESPN:

"I had no part -- active, passive, or through willful ignorance -- in the conspiracy described in the complaint. I had no reason to know about the conspiracy described in the complaint, and no reason to know about the complicity of any UL assistant coach or staff member in any bribery conspiracy. I never have had any part -- active, passive, or through willful ignorance -- in any effort, successful or unsuccessful, completed or abandoned, to pay any recruit, or any family member of a recruit, or anyone else on a recruit's behalf, as an inducement to attend UL."

In the document, Gatto and two accomplices (Merl Code and Munish Sood) are accused of funneling $100,000 through a Louisville coach to five-star recruit Brian Bowen to secure his commitment to the university. A Louisville coach referred to in the suit as "Coach-2" is accused of calling Gatto to ask for more money to bribe Bowen. Coach-2 is believed to be Pitino, though the coach has denied knowing anything of the alleged scheme.

Pitino told the The Courier-Journal after the scandal went public that he believes he "will be vindicated." Despite his seemingly steadfast belief in his own innocence, Pitino was first put on unpaid disciplinary suspension and then fired for "just cause" by Louisville, which would allow the university to abstain from paying the remainder of Pitino's contract.

Adidas released the following statement regarding Pitino's lawsuit, via ESPN's Darren Rovell:

"Mr. Pitino's lawsuit is clearly a reaction to his termination yesterday and is without merit."

At Louisville, Pitino was one of the highest paid coaches in college basketball with an annual salary topping $7 million. Notably, a good portion of Pitino's salary was paid by Adidas, which is the official sponsor of Louisville athletics. The overwhelming majority—98 percent—of the money Adidas owed Louisville from a $39 million endorsement deal ended up in Pitino's pocket, per The Courier-Journal. In 2014–15 and 2015–16, Pitino was paid $1.5 million by Adidas each year, while the basketball program got $10,000 the first year and $25,000 the next year. In 2015-16, Adidas reportedly paid Pitino $2.25 million.

FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2011, file photo, Brian Faison, athletics director for the University of North Dakota, speaks during a hearing in the Pioneer Room of the North Dakota Capitol, about legislation that would give the University of North Dakota permission to retire its Fighting Sioux athletics nickname. Faison is retiring at the end of December. Faison was named to lead the department in 2008. He says the timing is right for his family and for his successor, who will have time to get in place before next season. (AP Photo/Dale Wetzel, File)

World Athletics Championships

Athletics - World Athletics Championships – Usain Bolt's farewell ceremony – London Stadium, London, Britain – August 13, 2017 – Usain Bolt of Jamaica gestures. REUTERS/Phil Noble

Usain Bolt Press Conference

Athletics - Usain Bolt Press Conference - London, Britain - August 1, 2017 Jamaica's Usain Bolt during the press conference Action Images via Reuters/Matthew Childs

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - Men's 100m Semifinals

FILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Semifinal - Men's 100m Semifinals - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 14/08/2016. -Usian Bolt (JAM) of Jamaica competes in the Men's 100 m Semifinals. REUTERS/Murad Sezer. Picture Supplied by Action Images

FILE PHOTO: Athletics - Men's 100m Semifinals

FILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Semifinal - Men's 100m Semifinals - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 14/08/2016. -Usian Bolt (JAM) of Jamaica competes in the Men's 100 m Semifinals. REUTERS/Murad Sezer. Picture Supplied by Action Images

Rick Pitino out at Louisville as expected amid federal probe

Steve Pence, attorney for basketball coach Rick Pitino, speaks to reporters following the closed door meeting of the Louisville Athletics Association, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Rick Pitino out at Louisville as expected amid federal probe

Steve Pence, attorney for basketball coach Rick Pitino, speaks to reporters following the closed door meeting of the Louisville Athletics Association, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Steve Pence, attorney for basketball coach Rick Pitino, speaks to reporters following the closed door meeting of the Louisville Athletics Association, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Steve Pence, attorney for basketball coach Rick Pitino, speaks to reporters following the closed door meeting of the Louisville Athletics Association, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Ex-Lady Vols star honoring Summitt by cycling 1,098 miles

This Nov. 2, 2012, photo provided by the University of Tennessee Athletics Department, shows Pat Summitt, left, and Michelle Marciniak at Lady Vol Hall of Fame induction ceremonies in Knoxville, Tenn. Michelle Brooke-Marciniak played for Pat Summitt on Tennessee's 1996 national championship team and now serves as a board member on her former coach's foundation. Brooke-Marciniak will honor Summitt once again this week as she joins a group of cyclists riding 1,098 miles - one mile for each of Summitts career wins - to raise money and awareness in fighting Alzheimers disease. (Wade Rackley/University of Tennessee Athletic Department via AP)

Rick Pitino Officially Out At Louisville

The University of Louisville's Athletics Association officially voted on Monday to fire men's head basketball coach Rick Pitino amid a federal investigation.

Rick Pitino Officially Out At Louisville

The University of Louisville's Athletics Association officially voted on Monday to fire men's head basketball coach Rick Pitino amid a federal investigation.

Rick Pitino Officially Out At Louisville

The University of Louisville's Athletics Association officially voted on Monday to fire men's head basketball coach Rick Pitino amid a federal investigation.

Rick Pitino Officially Out At Louisville

The University of Louisville's Athletics Association officially voted on Monday to fire men's head basketball coach Rick Pitino amid a federal investigation.

After reports of firing shot down, Maryland AD Kevin Anderson announces 'sabbatical'

On Monday, Kevin Anderson sent a memo to Maryland’s senior athletics staff and head coaches saying the school has granted him the ability to “take a six-month professional development sabbatical” while remaining in his position as AD.

After reports of firing shot down, Maryland AD Kevin Anderson announces 'sabbatical'

On Monday, Kevin Anderson sent a memo to Maryland’s senior athletics staff and head coaches saying the school has granted him the ability to “take a six-month professional development sabbatical” while remaining in his position as AD.

After reports of firing shot down, Maryland AD Kevin Anderson announces 'sabbatical'

On Monday, Kevin Anderson sent a memo to Maryland’s senior athletics staff and head coaches saying the school has granted him the ability to “take a six-month professional development sabbatical” while remaining in his position as AD.

After reports of firing shot down, Maryland AD Kevin Anderson announces 'sabbatical'

On Monday, Kevin Anderson sent a memo to Maryland’s senior athletics staff and head coaches saying the school has granted him the ability to “take a six-month professional development sabbatical” while remaining in his position as AD.

Louisville Head Coach Rick Pitino Officially Fired

The University of Louisville's Athletics Association officially voted on Monday to fire men's head basketball coach Rick Pitino "with just cause" amid a federal investigation that saw 10 people arrested, accused of corruption and taking bribes, according to Jeff Borzello of ESPN.

In light of this decision, Adidas, which sponsors Louisville, released a statement saying it terminated its personal services agreement with Pitino. It was recently reported that Pitino received 98 percent of the $39 million Adidas owed Louisville from their sponsorship deal.

Pitino, 65, was placed on unpaid administrative leave last month by interim university President Greg Postel after school officials admitted they were in involved in the investigation concerning recruit bribery in an attempt to steer players to certain schools and shoe apparel companies.

On Oct. 2, the ULAA authorized Postel to start the process of terminating Pitino for cause.

The next day, Pitino received a letter from Postel informing him that he violated his employment contract and that allegations in the federal government complaint "insinuate a scheme of fraud and malfeasance'" in recruiting, which gave the school a reason to put Pitino on unpaid leave.

The Department of Justice charged 10 people, including four college basketball assistant coaches, in conjunction with a corruption and fraud scheme and implicated the Cardinals program in the illegal payment of a recruit.

Pitino was not named in the federal complaint and has said he was unaware of any payment to a recruit.

Authorities say that a Louisville assistant coach planned to send $100,000 to the father of a five–star recruit, believed to be freshman forward Brian Bowen.

Pitino was already suspended for the first five Atlantic Coast Conference games of this season after an investigation into the school's escort case.

With Pitino on leave, the school named assistant coach David Padgett head coach on an interim basis on Sept. 29. The ULAA also on Monday approved a one–year, $800,000 contract plus bonuses for Padgett.

The Cardinals open the regular season Nov. 12 against George Mason.

This Nov. 2, 2012, photo provided by the University of Tennessee Athletics Department, shows Pat Summitt, left, and Michelle Marciniak at Lady Vol Hall of Fame induction ceremonies in Knoxville, Tenn. Michelle Brooke-Marciniak played for Pat Summitt on Tennessee's 1996 national championship team and now serves as a board member on her former coach's foundation. Brooke-Marciniak will honor Summitt once again this week as she joins a group of cyclists riding 1,098 miles - one mile for each of Summitt’s career wins - to raise money and awareness in fighting Alzheimer’s disease. (Wade Rackley/University of Tennessee Athletic Department via AP)

Patrick Lange, Daniela Ryf Set Records in Ironman World Championship Victories

KAILUA-KONA, HAWAII – The Ironman World Championship is magical. This year, in both the men's and women's races, it was also record-setting.

Germany’s Patrick Lange finished the 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2-mile marathon in eight hours, one minute, 40 seconds on Saturday. Not only did Lange become world champion, he now holds the reigns to the overall course record, previously set by Australia’s Craig Alexander (8:03:56) in 2011. Consider this victory an encore for Lange, who only last year finished third in his Ironman World Championship pro debut, beating the 27-year old marathon course record set by the U.S.’s Mark Allen in 1989 with his 2:39:45 run.

“I’m overwhelmed and this is my life dream coming true,” said Lange, 31. “[During] the swim there was a lot of fighting, but I executed the swim like I wanted to.”

At the 21.6-mile mark of the marathon, the Frankfurt native closed the gap on Canada’s Lionel Sanders to one minute and 37 seconds and continued to chug, whizzing past Sanders at 23.4 miles. Lange never looked back and absorbed the energy that surrounds the notorious Kailua-Kona community at the famous Ali’i Drive finish.

“The bike was an interesting race dynamic with a lot of on and off,” Lange said. “It was really hard to stay on the bike [because of] conditions with the crosswinds. Then, I started the run feeling a little bit weak—I felt like it was a really hot day. At the aid station my body was a little overheating. But I found a good rhythm.”

Sanders, who finished second in 8:04:07, began the marathon crushing sub-six-minute miles during the initial trio and held the lead for a majority of race. Well, that’s until the Lange hammer struck in a painful way.

“This guy’s a freaking animal,” Sanders said jokingly of Lange. “It was a very humbling experience when I tried to go with him for a second … and it lasted about a second. This was the best fight I’ve ever been involved in.”

Climbing to the podium alongside Lange and Sanders was Great Britain’s David McNamee, who finished in 8:07:11.

“I remember looking at Patrick [at the finish] and he had that sheer look of ‘what just happened,’” McNamee said. “Give me five or six weeks and I’ll wake up and scream something when it really sinks in. I still can’t believe it.”

Two-time defending champion Jan Frodeno was plagued with injury in mile three of the run, but fought through the ailment and finished in 9:15:44.

Also finishing in the top five were German and 2014 world champion Sebastian Kienle (8:09:59) and South Africa’s James Cunnama (8:11:24).

“It really hurts to talk about a fourth place finish,” Kienle said after the race. “But I gave myself the chance. Before the race, my goal was to empty the tank and I did. I finished with nothing left.”

In the women’s race, Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf completed the hat trick of world champions. The Swiss sensation captured her third connective victory on the Big Island with a stellar finish of 8:50:47. This victory comes just a year after she set a new women’s course record, crossing the finish in 8:46:46—a stat set in 2013 by three-time world champion, Australia’s Mirinda Carfrae.

“[Today] was the hottest I’ve ever felt,” said Ryf. “I got off on the run in a position I was totally surprised at. It was the most I had to fight with the wind. There were certainly times today I didn’t think it was possible.”

Interestingly, Ryf, who also is the gatekeeper of three Ironman 70.3 titles, was in third—behind Great Britain’s Lucy Charles and the U.S.’s Lauren Brandon—at the 100-mile mark of the bike, but zoomed to a first place 4:53:10 split.

“The whole bike was a rollercoaster of emotions,” said Ryf, who’s dubbed the Angry Bird. “I was struggling and trying to catch up but certainly didn’t think it would take me that long. Either I was going to lose this race or put the hammer down. I just went all in.”

Ryf, 30, became the first woman to three-peat since four-time world champion, Great Britain’s Chrissie Wellington, who did so in 2007-09. Following Ryf to the podium were Charles (8:59:38) and Australia’s Sarah Crowley (9:01:38).

“If anyone was going to tell me you’d finish second, I’d say, ‘I don’t think that’s possible,’” Charles said. “But everything all came together.”

The trio was followed at the finish by the U.S.’s Heather Jackson (9:02:29) and Finland’s Kaisa Sali (9:04:40). In 2015, the jackrabbit Jackson finished fifth, made her world championship pro debut and was the first U.S. woman to cross the finish. Last year, she encored in the spotlight by becoming the first stateswoman to podium at the world championship in 10 years—Desiree Ficker received the honor in 2006.

"Today, I improved my times in all three [areas], so I’m totally happy with that,” Jackson said with a confident smile. “It was a battle all day out there. That’s racing. It’s exciting.”

This year, more than 260,000 professional and age group athletes attempted to qualify for the Ironman World Championship either through worldwide Ironman (full-distance) or Ironman 70.3 (half-distance) races, or by legacy or lottery. There were more than 2,400 athletes, representing 66 countries, regions and territories, on six continents.

“It was a tough day,” Ryf said. “It was painful. There are days it’s not always coming for free—you have to fight through it.”

Dreams come true for 12-year-old aspiring Ironman

Earlier this September, 12-year-old Nicholas Purschke completed his first triathlon—a great accomplishment for any young athlete, but a particularly remarkable one for the St. Louis native.

Nicholas was diagnosed at birth with Cerebral Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) and completed a successful bone marrow transplant in August 2016. In less than a year from his transplant, Nicholas crushed the odds and returned to athletics, thanks to some inspiration from the world’s most elite triathletes.

“When I was in the hospital trying to keep my strength, working every day with PT, and not giving up—it’s kind of like what these athletes go through on their journey,” Nicholas says. “They inspired me to keep working, to not give up, to exercise every day … even if I wasn’t feeling well or in pain. Just like me, they keep going despite challenges.”

The Ironman Foundation teamed up with Make-A-Wish for the first time—not just at the world championship but at any of more than 200 Ironman events spread across 50 countries—to fulfill the dream of a Wish Kid. At this year’s race in Kona, Nicholas was able to see his heroes.

ALD, a deadly genetic disease that affects 1 in 18,000 people, triggers mostly preadolescent boys between the ages of four and 10, and isn’t specific to race, ethnicity or geographical location. The ailment destroys the protective sheath surrounding the brain’s neurons—known as myelin—and if left untreated can lead to blindness, seizures, loss of muscle control and dementia. Furthermore, generally within two to five years after its diagnosis, death or permanent disability will occur.

“Bone marrow transplant is the only treatment currently that stops the progression,” says Julie, Nicholas’ mom, who is a carrier of ALD. “At age 10, ALD had begun to creep into Nicholas’ ventricles in his brain, so he was recommended for transplant and typed for a match—a perfect match was found from an umbilical cord donor. Within one month of transplant, his disease was halted miraculously.”

The strong-willed Nicholas interacted with some of his favorite triathletes during race week, including Americans Ben Hoffman and Tim O’Donnell, and Australia’s Mirinda Carfrae. All four share a very familiar bond.

“I’m a big runner and really enjoy running—I’m trying to get up most mornings before school to run a couple of miles each day,” Nicholas says. “I just did my first triathlon and hope to do more—eventually do an Ironman, myself, and get to the championship someday.”

Only 12-years-old, Nicholas has proven that age holds no barrier on the strength of mental integrity and willingness to fight such a difficult battle. It takes a certain maturity to understand, accept and face the challenge with passion.

“He did not ask for this disease or this journey, but has tackled it with such determination, courage, strong and admirable faith, grace and positive attitude,” Julie says. “Nicholas was—and is—always looking for ways to improve himself, and become better and stronger at anything he does. That’s how he has faced this disease.”

To learn more and find out how you can get involved with Make-A-Wish in your local community, visit wish.org.

Patrick Lange, Daniela Ryf Set Records in Ironman World Championship Victories

KAILUA-KONA, HAWAII – The Ironman World Championship is magical. This year, in both the men's and women's races, it was also record-setting.

Germany’s Patrick Lange finished the 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2-mile marathon in eight hours, one minute, 40 seconds on Saturday. Not only did Lange become world champion, he now holds the reigns to the overall course record, previously set by Australia’s Craig Alexander (8:03:56) in 2011. Consider this victory an encore for Lange, who only last year finished third in his Ironman World Championship pro debut, beating the 27-year old marathon course record set by the U.S.’s Mark Allen in 1989 with his 2:39:45 run.

“I’m overwhelmed and this is my life dream coming true,” said Lange, 31. “[During] the swim there was a lot of fighting, but I executed the swim like I wanted to.”

At the 21.6-mile mark of the marathon, the Frankfurt native closed the gap on Canada’s Lionel Sanders to one minute and 37 seconds and continued to chug, whizzing past Sanders at 23.4 miles. Lange never looked back and absorbed the energy that surrounds the notorious Kailua-Kona community at the famous Ali’i Drive finish.

“The bike was an interesting race dynamic with a lot of on and off,” Lange said. “It was really hard to stay on the bike [because of] conditions with the crosswinds. Then, I started the run feeling a little bit weak—I felt like it was a really hot day. At the aid station my body was a little overheating. But I found a good rhythm.”

Sanders, who finished second in 8:04:07, began the marathon crushing sub-six-minute miles during the initial trio and held the lead for a majority of race. Well, that’s until the Lange hammer struck in a painful way.

“This guy’s a freaking animal,” Sanders said jokingly of Lange. “It was a very humbling experience when I tried to go with him for a second … and it lasted about a second. This was the best fight I’ve ever been involved in.”

Climbing to the podium alongside Lange and Sanders was Great Britain’s David McNamee, who finished in 8:07:11.

“I remember looking at Patrick [at the finish] and he had that sheer look of ‘what just happened,’” McNamee said. “Give me five or six weeks and I’ll wake up and scream something when it really sinks in. I still can’t believe it.”

Two-time defending champion Jan Frodeno was plagued with injury in mile three of the run, but fought through the ailment and finished in 9:15:44.

Also finishing in the top five were German and 2014 world champion Sebastian Kienle (8:09:59) and South Africa’s James Cunnama (8:11:24).

“It really hurts to talk about a fourth place finish,” Kienle said after the race. “But I gave myself the chance. Before the race, my goal was to empty the tank and I did. I finished with nothing left.”

In the women’s race, Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf completed the hat trick of world champions. The Swiss sensation captured her third connective victory on the Big Island with a stellar finish of 8:50:47. This victory comes just a year after she set a new women’s course record, crossing the finish in 8:46:46—a stat set in 2013 by three-time world champion, Australia’s Mirinda Carfrae.

“[Today] was the hottest I’ve ever felt,” said Ryf. “I got off on the run in a position I was totally surprised at. It was the most I had to fight with the wind. There were certainly times today I didn’t think it was possible.”

Interestingly, Ryf, who also is the gatekeeper of three Ironman 70.3 titles, was in third—behind Great Britain’s Lucy Charles and the U.S.’s Lauren Brandon—at the 100-mile mark of the bike, but zoomed to a first place 4:53:10 split.

“The whole bike was a rollercoaster of emotions,” said Ryf, who’s dubbed the Angry Bird. “I was struggling and trying to catch up but certainly didn’t think it would take me that long. Either I was going to lose this race or put the hammer down. I just went all in.”

Ryf, 30, became the first woman to three-peat since four-time world champion, Great Britain’s Chrissie Wellington, who did so in 2007-09. Following Ryf to the podium were Charles (8:59:38) and Australia’s Sarah Crowley (9:01:38).

“If anyone was going to tell me you’d finish second, I’d say, ‘I don’t think that’s possible,’” Charles said. “But everything all came together.”

The trio was followed at the finish by the U.S.’s Heather Jackson (9:02:29) and Finland’s Kaisa Sali (9:04:40). In 2015, the jackrabbit Jackson finished fifth, made her world championship pro debut and was the first U.S. woman to cross the finish. Last year, she encored in the spotlight by becoming the first stateswoman to podium at the world championship in 10 years—Desiree Ficker received the honor in 2006.

"Today, I improved my times in all three [areas], so I’m totally happy with that,” Jackson said with a confident smile. “It was a battle all day out there. That’s racing. It’s exciting.”

This year, more than 260,000 professional and age group athletes attempted to qualify for the Ironman World Championship either through worldwide Ironman (full-distance) or Ironman 70.3 (half-distance) races, or by legacy or lottery. There were more than 2,400 athletes, representing 66 countries, regions and territories, on six continents.

“It was a tough day,” Ryf said. “It was painful. There are days it’s not always coming for free—you have to fight through it.”

Dreams come true for 12-year-old aspiring Ironman

Earlier this September, 12-year-old Nicholas Purschke completed his first triathlon—a great accomplishment for any young athlete, but a particularly remarkable one for the St. Louis native.

Nicholas was diagnosed at birth with Cerebral Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) and completed a successful bone marrow transplant in August 2016. In less than a year from his transplant, Nicholas crushed the odds and returned to athletics, thanks to some inspiration from the world’s most elite triathletes.

“When I was in the hospital trying to keep my strength, working every day with PT, and not giving up—it’s kind of like what these athletes go through on their journey,” Nicholas says. “They inspired me to keep working, to not give up, to exercise every day … even if I wasn’t feeling well or in pain. Just like me, they keep going despite challenges.”

The Ironman Foundation teamed up with Make-A-Wish for the first time—not just at the world championship but at any of more than 200 Ironman events spread across 50 countries—to fulfill the dream of a Wish Kid. At this year’s race in Kona, Nicholas was able to see his heroes.

ALD, a deadly genetic disease that affects 1 in 18,000 people, triggers mostly preadolescent boys between the ages of four and 10, and isn’t specific to race, ethnicity or geographical location. The ailment destroys the protective sheath surrounding the brain’s neurons—known as myelin—and if left untreated can lead to blindness, seizures, loss of muscle control and dementia. Furthermore, generally within two to five years after its diagnosis, death or permanent disability will occur.

“Bone marrow transplant is the only treatment currently that stops the progression,” says Julie, Nicholas’ mom, who is a carrier of ALD. “At age 10, ALD had begun to creep into Nicholas’ ventricles in his brain, so he was recommended for transplant and typed for a match—a perfect match was found from an umbilical cord donor. Within one month of transplant, his disease was halted miraculously.”

The strong-willed Nicholas interacted with some of his favorite triathletes during race week, including Americans Ben Hoffman and Tim O’Donnell, and Australia’s Mirinda Carfrae. All four share a very familiar bond.

“I’m a big runner and really enjoy running—I’m trying to get up most mornings before school to run a couple of miles each day,” Nicholas says. “I just did my first triathlon and hope to do more—eventually do an Ironman, myself, and get to the championship someday.”

Only 12-years-old, Nicholas has proven that age holds no barrier on the strength of mental integrity and willingness to fight such a difficult battle. It takes a certain maturity to understand, accept and face the challenge with passion.

“He did not ask for this disease or this journey, but has tackled it with such determination, courage, strong and admirable faith, grace and positive attitude,” Julie says. “Nicholas was—and is—always looking for ways to improve himself, and become better and stronger at anything he does. That’s how he has faced this disease.”

To learn more and find out how you can get involved with Make-A-Wish in your local community, visit wish.org.

Patrick Lange, Daniela Ryf Set Records in Ironman World Championship Victories

KAILUA-KONA, HAWAII – The Ironman World Championship is magical. This year, in both the men's and women's races, it was also record-setting.

Germany’s Patrick Lange finished the 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2-mile marathon in eight hours, one minute, 40 seconds on Saturday. Not only did Lange become world champion, he now holds the reigns to the overall course record, previously set by Australia’s Craig Alexander (8:03:56) in 2011. Consider this victory an encore for Lange, who only last year finished third in his Ironman World Championship pro debut, beating the 27-year old marathon course record set by the U.S.’s Mark Allen in 1989 with his 2:39:45 run.

“I’m overwhelmed and this is my life dream coming true,” said Lange, 31. “[During] the swim there was a lot of fighting, but I executed the swim like I wanted to.”

At the 21.6-mile mark of the marathon, the Frankfurt native closed the gap on Canada’s Lionel Sanders to one minute and 37 seconds and continued to chug, whizzing past Sanders at 23.4 miles. Lange never looked back and absorbed the energy that surrounds the notorious Kailua-Kona community at the famous Ali’i Drive finish.

“The bike was an interesting race dynamic with a lot of on and off,” Lange said. “It was really hard to stay on the bike [because of] conditions with the crosswinds. Then, I started the run feeling a little bit weak—I felt like it was a really hot day. At the aid station my body was a little overheating. But I found a good rhythm.”

Sanders, who finished second in 8:04:07, began the marathon crushing sub-six-minute miles during the initial trio and held the lead for a majority of race. Well, that’s until the Lange hammer struck in a painful way.

“This guy’s a freaking animal,” Sanders said jokingly of Lange. “It was a very humbling experience when I tried to go with him for a second … and it lasted about a second. This was the best fight I’ve ever been involved in.”

Climbing to the podium alongside Lange and Sanders was Great Britain’s David McNamee, who finished in 8:07:11.

“I remember looking at Patrick [at the finish] and he had that sheer look of ‘what just happened,’” McNamee said. “Give me five or six weeks and I’ll wake up and scream something when it really sinks in. I still can’t believe it.”

Two-time defending champion Jan Frodeno was plagued with injury in mile three of the run, but fought through the ailment and finished in 9:15:44.

Also finishing in the top five were German and 2014 world champion Sebastian Kienle (8:09:59) and South Africa’s James Cunnama (8:11:24).

“It really hurts to talk about a fourth place finish,” Kienle said after the race. “But I gave myself the chance. Before the race, my goal was to empty the tank and I did. I finished with nothing left.”

In the women’s race, Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf completed the hat trick of world champions. The Swiss sensation captured her third connective victory on the Big Island with a stellar finish of 8:50:47. This victory comes just a year after she set a new women’s course record, crossing the finish in 8:46:46—a stat set in 2013 by three-time world champion, Australia’s Mirinda Carfrae.

“[Today] was the hottest I’ve ever felt,” said Ryf. “I got off on the run in a position I was totally surprised at. It was the most I had to fight with the wind. There were certainly times today I didn’t think it was possible.”

Interestingly, Ryf, who also is the gatekeeper of three Ironman 70.3 titles, was in third—behind Great Britain’s Lucy Charles and the U.S.’s Lauren Brandon—at the 100-mile mark of the bike, but zoomed to a first place 4:53:10 split.

“The whole bike was a rollercoaster of emotions,” said Ryf, who’s dubbed the Angry Bird. “I was struggling and trying to catch up but certainly didn’t think it would take me that long. Either I was going to lose this race or put the hammer down. I just went all in.”

Ryf, 30, became the first woman to three-peat since four-time world champion, Great Britain’s Chrissie Wellington, who did so in 2007-09. Following Ryf to the podium were Charles (8:59:38) and Australia’s Sarah Crowley (9:01:38).

“If anyone was going to tell me you’d finish second, I’d say, ‘I don’t think that’s possible,’” Charles said. “But everything all came together.”

The trio was followed at the finish by the U.S.’s Heather Jackson (9:02:29) and Finland’s Kaisa Sali (9:04:40). In 2015, the jackrabbit Jackson finished fifth, made her world championship pro debut and was the first U.S. woman to cross the finish. Last year, she encored in the spotlight by becoming the first stateswoman to podium at the world championship in 10 years—Desiree Ficker received the honor in 2006.

"Today, I improved my times in all three [areas], so I’m totally happy with that,” Jackson said with a confident smile. “It was a battle all day out there. That’s racing. It’s exciting.”

This year, more than 260,000 professional and age group athletes attempted to qualify for the Ironman World Championship either through worldwide Ironman (full-distance) or Ironman 70.3 (half-distance) races, or by legacy or lottery. There were more than 2,400 athletes, representing 66 countries, regions and territories, on six continents.

“It was a tough day,” Ryf said. “It was painful. There are days it’s not always coming for free—you have to fight through it.”

Dreams come true for 12-year-old aspiring Ironman

Earlier this September, 12-year-old Nicholas Purschke completed his first triathlon—a great accomplishment for any young athlete, but a particularly remarkable one for the St. Louis native.

Nicholas was diagnosed at birth with Cerebral Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) and completed a successful bone marrow transplant in August 2016. In less than a year from his transplant, Nicholas crushed the odds and returned to athletics, thanks to some inspiration from the world’s most elite triathletes.

“When I was in the hospital trying to keep my strength, working every day with PT, and not giving up—it’s kind of like what these athletes go through on their journey,” Nicholas says. “They inspired me to keep working, to not give up, to exercise every day … even if I wasn’t feeling well or in pain. Just like me, they keep going despite challenges.”

The Ironman Foundation teamed up with Make-A-Wish for the first time—not just at the world championship but at any of more than 200 Ironman events spread across 50 countries—to fulfill the dream of a Wish Kid. At this year’s race in Kona, Nicholas was able to see his heroes.

ALD, a deadly genetic disease that affects 1 in 18,000 people, triggers mostly preadolescent boys between the ages of four and 10, and isn’t specific to race, ethnicity or geographical location. The ailment destroys the protective sheath surrounding the brain’s neurons—known as myelin—and if left untreated can lead to blindness, seizures, loss of muscle control and dementia. Furthermore, generally within two to five years after its diagnosis, death or permanent disability will occur.

“Bone marrow transplant is the only treatment currently that stops the progression,” says Julie, Nicholas’ mom, who is a carrier of ALD. “At age 10, ALD had begun to creep into Nicholas’ ventricles in his brain, so he was recommended for transplant and typed for a match—a perfect match was found from an umbilical cord donor. Within one month of transplant, his disease was halted miraculously.”

The strong-willed Nicholas interacted with some of his favorite triathletes during race week, including Americans Ben Hoffman and Tim O’Donnell, and Australia’s Mirinda Carfrae. All four share a very familiar bond.

“I’m a big runner and really enjoy running—I’m trying to get up most mornings before school to run a couple of miles each day,” Nicholas says. “I just did my first triathlon and hope to do more—eventually do an Ironman, myself, and get to the championship someday.”

Only 12-years-old, Nicholas has proven that age holds no barrier on the strength of mental integrity and willingness to fight such a difficult battle. It takes a certain maturity to understand, accept and face the challenge with passion.

“He did not ask for this disease or this journey, but has tackled it with such determination, courage, strong and admirable faith, grace and positive attitude,” Julie says. “Nicholas was—and is—always looking for ways to improve himself, and become better and stronger at anything he does. That’s how he has faced this disease.”

To learn more and find out how you can get involved with Make-A-Wish in your local community, visit wish.org.

Nebraska picks Washington State AD to head athletics program

Bill Moos talks about student athletes, his management style and what he looks for in an NCAA college football program during a news conference in Lincoln, Neb., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, where it was announced he will be the new athletic director at Nebraska. (Kaylay Wolf/The Journal-Star via AP)

Nebraska picks Washington State AD to head athletics program

Nebraska coach Mike Riley gestures during the first half of the team's NCAA college football game against Ohio State in Lincoln, Neb., Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. Ohio State won 56-14. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

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