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FILE - In this June 1, 2015 file photo, Judge Humberto Otazu talks to journalists as he exits Migone Hospital, after meeting with Nicolas Leoz, former president of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) and former FIFA executive member in Asuncion, Paraguay. Otazu confirmed on Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, that he has approved the extradition of Leoz who is one of those charged in a corruption scandal being investigated by the U.S. Justice Department. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz, File)

Sepp Blatter's Fifa vice-president took $1m bribe to vote for Qatar to win 2022 World Cup, court hears

Sepp Blatter’s most senior vice-president at Fifa took at least $1 million in bribes to vote for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup, a court has heard. Julio Grondona, who was effectively Blatter’s number two until his death in 2014, allegedly told an Argentinian sports marketing executive he had been “owed” the money in exchange for helping the tiny Gulf state secure the tournament. Alejandro Burzaco, the former chief executive of Torneos y Competencias SA, told the first major trial in the Fifa scandal he did not know the source of a bribe that has long been suspected but said Grondona angrily confronted Qatari officials following reports he had been bought off, demanding $80m or a statement from them denying paying him. Organisers of the Qatar World Cup have repeatedly denied paying bribes, distancing themselves from Mohamed bin Hammam, the country’s disgraced Fifa former executive committee member previously accused of orchestrating such a scheme. Burzaco, who pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights, told a court in Brooklyn, New York, that while he was arranging a $1m bung to Grondona and another to fellow Fifa executive Ricardo Teixeira over the rights to the Copa America, the former confessed to taking one for his World Cup vote. Alejandro Burzaco (right) pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights Credit: AP Burzaco said Grondona told him a month after the December 2010 ballot to pay him Teixeria’s $1m Copa America bribe, which the Brazilian “owed him” as “Grondona voted for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup”. The witness also told the court he had accompanied the duo and another ExCo member, Conmebol president Nicolás Leoz, to Zurich for the vote and knew they planned to back Qatar. Burzaco testified that Grondona told him Leoz then voted for Japan and then South Korea but switched his allegiance to Qatar when the long-standing head of the Argentine Football Association said to him: “What the hell are you doing? Are you the one not voting for Qatar?” Describing an altercation between Grondona and Qatari officials at a Fifa event 11 months later amid reports he had sold his vote, Burzaco said: “Basically, Grondona told them, ‘You will pay me $80m or write a letter saying you never paid me’.” The trial of three former Fifa officials, José Maria Marin, Juan Ángel Napout and Manuel Burga continues. The trio all deny taking bribes in exchange for football broadcast rights in what prosecutors have branded the “World Cup of fraud”.

Sepp Blatter's Fifa vice-president took $1m bribe to vote for Qatar to win 2022 World Cup, court hears

Sepp Blatter’s most senior vice-president at Fifa took at least $1 million in bribes to vote for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup, a court has heard. Julio Grondona, who was effectively Blatter’s number two until his death in 2014, allegedly told an Argentinian sports marketing executive he had been “owed” the money in exchange for helping the tiny Gulf state secure the tournament. Alejandro Burzaco, the former chief executive of Torneos y Competencias SA, told the first major trial in the Fifa scandal he did not know the source of a bribe that has long been suspected but said Grondona angrily confronted Qatari officials following reports he had been bought off, demanding $80m or a statement from them denying paying him. Organisers of the Qatar World Cup have repeatedly denied paying bribes, distancing themselves from Mohamed bin Hammam, the country’s disgraced Fifa former executive committee member previously accused of orchestrating such a scheme. Burzaco, who pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights, told a court in Brooklyn, New York, that while he was arranging a $1m bung to Grondona and another to fellow Fifa executive Ricardo Teixeira over the rights to the Copa America, the former confessed to taking one for his World Cup vote. Alejandro Burzaco (right) pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights Credit: AP Burzaco said Grondona told him a month after the December 2010 ballot to pay him Teixeria’s $1m Copa America bribe, which the Brazilian “owed him” as “Grondona voted for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup”. The witness also told the court he had accompanied the duo and another ExCo member, Conmebol president Nicolás Leoz, to Zurich for the vote and knew they planned to back Qatar. Burzaco testified that Grondona told him Leoz then voted for Japan and then South Korea but switched his allegiance to Qatar when the long-standing head of the Argentine Football Association said to him: “What the hell are you doing? Are you the one not voting for Qatar?” Describing an altercation between Grondona and Qatari officials at a Fifa event 11 months later amid reports he had sold his vote, Burzaco said: “Basically, Grondona told them, ‘You will pay me $80m or write a letter saying you never paid me’.” The trial of three former Fifa officials, José Maria Marin, Juan Ángel Napout and Manuel Burga continues. The trio all deny taking bribes in exchange for football broadcast rights in what prosecutors have branded the “World Cup of fraud”.

Call of Duty: WW2 multiplayer tips | Your guide to getting a head-start on the battlefield

Sledgehammer Games has tried to make Call of Duty: WW2 more welcoming to new and lapsed players this year, but there is still an overwhelming amount to take in when you start the game for the first time. With that in mind, we thought we’d get some tips from the developers themselves. Here, principal multiplayer systems designer Greg Reisdorf offers some beginner’s assistance for the competitive modes. Head this way, meanwhile, as Jon Horsley, senior director of development, talks us through Nazi Zombies mode. Multiplayer tips Domination If you’re new to the Call of Duty series, or you’ve been drawn back by its return to a World War II setting, there are a few options that should ensure a more gentle introduction. The best game type to start with, Greg Reisdorf tells us, is Domination: “You're going to want to stick with Dom in the beginning,” he confirms. “It gives you places to go, you can capture points – basically, you can achieve things without having to kill people.” Gridiron If you’ve played Call of Duty before, this is Uplink with a leather football. If you haven’t, then as the name suggests, it’s like a weaponised take on American football. Each side has a small endzone or goal, and your objective is to score points by carrying the ball there (7 points) or throwing it in (3 points). Reisdorf suggests sticking to Airborne division for your character class, and to pick an SMG as your primary weapon: “Take a basic training called Gunslinger, which allows you to shoot while you're sprinting. You're going to be running all over the place, going after the ball, and as you're doing that you can fire – you don't have to worry about reloading or aiming or any of that stuff. Put on steady aim and extended mags for that and you should be good to go - you'll be [one of] the fastest on the field.” Call of Duty WW2's Gridiron mode is similar to uplink... just with a leather football Search and Destroy This mode is a good place to rack up experience points, but with just one life it’s not for the faint-hearted. But a combination of the right loadout and the right gaming hardware will improve your chances of survival, as Reisdorf elaborates: “The Mountain Division has an ability [that gives them] quieter footsteps. If you're playing with a good pair of headphones, you can really hear those sounds and be able to identify where people are coming from. I’ve been in some matches where people have been right on top of the bomb planter and haven't even noticed, but if you listen carefully there are all sorts of audio cues that are really important to the game.” Call of Duty WWII Where to buy Headquarters “For those brand new players who just want to hang out and be part of the community without necessarily caring about their K/D [kill/death ratio] there’s Headquarters, where you can increase your social rank and get cool stuff that other players don't necessarily have,” Reisdorf says. Here, it’s worth spending some time with your friends at the shooting range, not only to challenge one another, but because some of the Easter eggs there require several players to trigger. So are there any more secrets? “There are also some clay pigeon targets that are available after certain sequences, which are very hard to shoot!” Reisdorf grins. “The other thing to note is that the targets that are further away are worth more points, so when you're in there and you're challenging people to a shootout, just remember that.”

Call of Duty: WW2 multiplayer tips | Your guide to getting a head-start on the battlefield

Sledgehammer Games has tried to make Call of Duty: WW2 more welcoming to new and lapsed players this year, but there is still an overwhelming amount to take in when you start the game for the first time. With that in mind, we thought we’d get some tips from the developers themselves. Here, principal multiplayer systems designer Greg Reisdorf offers some beginner’s assistance for the competitive modes. Head this way, meanwhile, as Jon Horsley, senior director of development, talks us through Nazi Zombies mode. Multiplayer tips Domination If you’re new to the Call of Duty series, or you’ve been drawn back by its return to a World War II setting, there are a few options that should ensure a more gentle introduction. The best game type to start with, Greg Reisdorf tells us, is Domination: “You're going to want to stick with Dom in the beginning,” he confirms. “It gives you places to go, you can capture points – basically, you can achieve things without having to kill people.” Gridiron If you’ve played Call of Duty before, this is Uplink with a leather football. If you haven’t, then as the name suggests, it’s like a weaponised take on American football. Each side has a small endzone or goal, and your objective is to score points by carrying the ball there (7 points) or throwing it in (3 points). Reisdorf suggests sticking to Airborne division for your character class, and to pick an SMG as your primary weapon: “Take a basic training called Gunslinger, which allows you to shoot while you're sprinting. You're going to be running all over the place, going after the ball, and as you're doing that you can fire – you don't have to worry about reloading or aiming or any of that stuff. Put on steady aim and extended mags for that and you should be good to go - you'll be [one of] the fastest on the field.” Call of Duty WW2's Gridiron mode is similar to uplink... just with a leather football Search and Destroy This mode is a good place to rack up experience points, but with just one life it’s not for the faint-hearted. But a combination of the right loadout and the right gaming hardware will improve your chances of survival, as Reisdorf elaborates: “The Mountain Division has an ability [that gives them] quieter footsteps. If you're playing with a good pair of headphones, you can really hear those sounds and be able to identify where people are coming from. I’ve been in some matches where people have been right on top of the bomb planter and haven't even noticed, but if you listen carefully there are all sorts of audio cues that are really important to the game.” Call of Duty WWII Where to buy Headquarters “For those brand new players who just want to hang out and be part of the community without necessarily caring about their K/D [kill/death ratio] there’s Headquarters, where you can increase your social rank and get cool stuff that other players don't necessarily have,” Reisdorf says. Here, it’s worth spending some time with your friends at the shooting range, not only to challenge one another, but because some of the Easter eggs there require several players to trigger. So are there any more secrets? “There are also some clay pigeon targets that are available after certain sequences, which are very hard to shoot!” Reisdorf grins. “The other thing to note is that the targets that are further away are worth more points, so when you're in there and you're challenging people to a shootout, just remember that.”

The former head of the Confederation of South American Football (CONMEBOL), Nicolas Leoz, shown here in 2013, is under house arrest on US charges in the FIFA corruption case but extradition attempts have thus far failed

The former head of the Confederation of South American Football (CONMEBOL), Nicolas Leoz, shown here in 2013, is under house arrest on US charges in the FIFA corruption case but extradition attempts have thus far failed

The former head of the Confederation of South American Football (CONMEBOL), Nicolas Leoz, shown here in 2013, is under house arrest on US charges in the FIFA corruption case but extradition attempts have thus far failed (AFP Photo/Norberto DUARTE)

The former head of the Confederation of South American Football (CONMEBOL), Nicolas Leoz, shown here in 2013, is under house arrest on US charges in the FIFA corruption case but extradition attempts have thus far failed

American football - Newton throws four TDs as Panthers rout Dolphins

Cam Newton rolls out and throws a touchdown pass to Christian McCaffrey during the rout of the Miami Dolphins (AFP Photo/GRANT HALVERSON)

Alan Shearer pledges to donate his brain when he dies for research into dementia and football

Alan Shearer has pledged to donate his brain when he dies to the growing ‘bank’ that is being created by former British professionals for research into dementia and playing football. The 47-year-old former England captain fronted a powerful BBC documentary into the issue on Sunday shortly after The Telegraph had also reported how families of suffering players in this country were following those in American Football by donating the brains of loved ones to research. This is because chronic traumatic encephalopathy - a devastating form of dementia that is caused by head trauma – can only be diagnosed in post-mortem and the full scale of the crisis was only accepted by the National Football League in America after hundreds of autopsies. Shearer says the issue has been “swept under the carpet” here and, after admitting to fears that he will suffer CTE in later life, the Premier League's record scorer has informed the Scottish neuropathologist Dr Willie Stewart that he wants to donate his brain. Dr Stewart diagnosed the first CTE case in a British footballer when he examined Jeff Astle’s brain in post-mortem. Boston University have also diagnosed CTE in the former Chicago Fire ‘soccer’ player Patrick Grange and a study by the University College London this year found CTE in four out of six former players they examined. The Drake Foundation announced yesterday that it will now commit a further £1 million to UCL to build on this research. The Telegraph has been campaigning for research into the potential link between dementia and playing football following its own investigation, with the Football Association and the Professional Footballers’ Association also now promising six-figure funding to answer this question. Football dementia logo - desktop The FA/PFA research is separate to The Drake Foundation and will initially seek simply to answer whether former footballers are suffering disproportionately with neurodegenerative disease. An announcement on the team of experts who will undertake the study is due before Christmas. The Jeff Astle Foundation has now been contacted by more than 400 suffering families. Astle died in 2002 and the inquest attributed his death to brain damage sustained playing football. There is anger that the FA – and particularly the PFA – have not subsequently pushed for more research into the risks of playing football and the Astle family have called for a parliamentary inquiry into who knew what and when. "Nowhere near enough research has been done so far,” said Shearer.  Telegraph Sport dementia coverage  

Juan Angel Napout arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial in Brooklyn, New York

Former head of Paraguayan Football Association and former president of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Juan Angel Napout, arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Ornitz

Juan Angel Napout arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial in Brooklyn, New York

Former head of Paraguayan Football Association and former president of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Juan Angel Napout, arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Ortiz

NFL protest leader Colin Kaepernick named 'citizen of the year' by GQ

An NFL player who led a spate of protests by kneeling during the national anthem has been named 'citizen of the year' by GQ magazine. Colin Kaepernick began kneeling instead of standing during the American national anthem, played at the start of  games, last season to highlight racial inequality and police brutality. The move sparked a wave of protests from Mr Kaepernick's fellow players but was heavily criticised by some - including from Donald Trump. The US president said players who kneel during "The Star-Spangled Banner" should be fired. San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) and quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game  Credit: AP During a radio interview Mr Trump also said of the football player: "Maybe he should find a country that works better for him. Let him try. It won't happen." Mr Kaepernick has been publicly silent as his protest gesture was adopted by other players but the quarterback opted out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March. He led the team to the 2013 Super Bowl, where they lost to Baltimore 34-31. Activists Protest Outside NFL Fall League Meeting In New York Credit: Spencer Platt  He has not been signed by any other team since leaving the 49ers. In making the selection, GQ compared Mr Kaepernick to American sports icons such as boxer Muhammad Ali, who opposed the Vietnam War, and Jackie Robinson, the first black player in Major League Baseball. I'm honored to be recognized by @GQMagazine as Citizen of the Year. https://t.co/s6wBZTa6tH— Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) November 13, 2017 The magazine said of Mr Kaepernick's protest: "It cost him his job. It also transformed Colin Kaepernick into a lightning rod and a powerful symbol of activism and resistance". He declined to be interviewed by GQ but posed for pictures and Tweeted to say he was "honoured' by the recognition. The magazine 's story includes comments from several of Kaepernick's supporters and confidants.  Rapper J. Cole said the American football player "sacrificed his dream" to stand for something.  How the NFL anthem protest has evolved 02:09 Ninety-year-old singer and activist Harry Belafonte said seeing people like Mr Kaepernick taking action is "the greatest reward" he could ask for. Actress Gal Gadot, the star of Hollywood blockbuster Wonder Woman, basketball player Kevin Durant and Late Show host Stephen Colbert were also recognised by the magazine.  Ms Gadot was aptly named Wonder Woman of the Year, Mr Durant was named Champion of the Year and Mr Colbert was named GQ's Bad Hombre of the Year.

NFL protest leader Colin Kaepernick named 'citizen of the year' by GQ

An NFL player who led a spate of protests by kneeling during the national anthem has been named 'citizen of the year' by GQ magazine. Colin Kaepernick began kneeling instead of standing during the American national anthem, played at the start of  games, last season to highlight racial inequality and police brutality. The move sparked a wave of protests from Mr Kaepernick's fellow players but was heavily criticised by some - including from Donald Trump. The US president said players who kneel during "The Star-Spangled Banner" should be fired. San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) and quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game  Credit: AP During a radio interview Mr Trump also said of the football player: "Maybe he should find a country that works better for him. Let him try. It won't happen." Mr Kaepernick has been publicly silent as his protest gesture was adopted by other players but the quarterback opted out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March. He led the team to the 2013 Super Bowl, where they lost to Baltimore 34-31. Activists Protest Outside NFL Fall League Meeting In New York Credit: Spencer Platt  He has not been signed by any other team since leaving the 49ers. In making the selection, GQ compared Mr Kaepernick to American sports icons such as boxer Muhammad Ali, who opposed the Vietnam War, and Jackie Robinson, the first black player in Major League Baseball. I'm honored to be recognized by @GQMagazine as Citizen of the Year. https://t.co/s6wBZTa6tH— Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) November 13, 2017 The magazine said of Mr Kaepernick's protest: "It cost him his job. It also transformed Colin Kaepernick into a lightning rod and a powerful symbol of activism and resistance". He declined to be interviewed by GQ but posed for pictures and Tweeted to say he was "honoured' by the recognition. The magazine 's story includes comments from several of Kaepernick's supporters and confidants.  Rapper J. Cole said the American football player "sacrificed his dream" to stand for something.  How the NFL anthem protest has evolved 02:09 Ninety-year-old singer and activist Harry Belafonte said seeing people like Mr Kaepernick taking action is "the greatest reward" he could ask for. Actress Gal Gadot, the star of Hollywood blockbuster Wonder Woman, basketball player Kevin Durant and Late Show host Stephen Colbert were also recognised by the magazine.  Ms Gadot was aptly named Wonder Woman of the Year, Mr Durant was named Champion of the Year and Mr Colbert was named GQ's Bad Hombre of the Year.

Juan Angel Napout arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial in Brooklyn, New York

Former head of Paraguayan Football Association and former president of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Juan Angel Napout, arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Ornitz

Juan Angel Napout arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial in Brooklyn, New York

Former head of Paraguayan Football Association and former president of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Juan Angel Napout, arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Ornitz

Juan Angel Napout arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial in Brooklyn, New York

Former head of Paraguayan Football Association and former president of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Juan Angel Napout, arrives for opening arguments of the FIFA bribery trial at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse in New York, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Ortiz

Atlanta Falcons defensive end Adrian Clayborn (top) sacks Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. Clayborn was credited with six sacks in the game as the Falcons defeated the Cowboys. EFE

Atlanta Falcons tight end Austin Hooper in action against Dallas Cowboys cornerback Anthony Brown (L) during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. EFE

Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Justin Hardy (R) celebrates with Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (L) after Hardy scored a touchdown pass against the Dallas Cowboys during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. EFE

ELX16. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Cole Beasley (R) makes a reception against Atlanta Falcons cornerback Brian Poole (L) during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX17. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Cole Beasley (R) makes a reception against Atlanta Falcons cornerback Brian Poole (L) during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX18. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott pauses on the turf after getting sacked by the Atlanta Falcons during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX15. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons tight end Austin Hooper (L) dives against Dallas Cowboys cornerback Orlando Scandrick (R) in a failed touchdown attempt during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX14. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys running back Alfred Morris (R) in action against Atlanta Falcons safety Ricardo Allen (L) during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX13. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Justin Hardy (R) celebrates with Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (L) after Hardy scored a touchdown pass against the Dallas Cowboys during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX11. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons defensive end Adrian Clayborn (top) sacks Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. Clayborn was credited with six sacks in the game as the Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX12. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Justin Hardy (R) scores a touchdown against Dallas Cowboys cornerback Anthony Brown (C) and Cowboys safety Xavier Woods during the second half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. The Falcons defeated the Cowboys. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX09. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan Quinn reacts against the Dallas Cowboys during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX10. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- A US Army Ranger rappels onto the field in honor of Veterans Day before the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX06. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons tight end Austin Hooper in action against Dallas Cowboys cornerback Anthony Brown (L) during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX06. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys safety Byron Jones (L) tries to tackle Atlanta Falcons tight end Levine Toilolo (R) during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX06. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys head coach Jason Garrett (R) complaints to side judge Alex Kemp (L) during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX03. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (R) reacts with Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant after Prescott ran for a touchdown against the Atlanta Falcons during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX03. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan in action against the Dallas Cowboys during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX03. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys fullback Rod Smith (L) stretches for a first down against Atlanta Falcons linebacker Vic Beasley Jr. (R) during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX02. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (R) passes the ball under pressure by Atlanta Falcons linebacker Deion Jones (L) during the first half of the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

ELX01. Atlanta (United States), 12/11/2017.- Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones (L) walks off the field after warmups before the NFL American football game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Atlanta Falcons at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 12 November 2017. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

Exclusive: Footballers to create a 'brain bank' to deliver evidence into link between sport and dementia

Football dementia logo Families of former British footballers have agreed to create a ‘bank’ of donated brains to deliver new and potentially conclusive medical evidence into the link between football and dementia. The National Football League only acknowledged how American football has caused chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after the disease was repeatedly diagnosed following hundreds of autopsies by the Boston University ‘Brain Bank’ and a comparable body of research could now take place in the United Kingdom. The distinct tau proteins that are the hallmark of CTE – a devastating strain of dementia that is caused by repeated blows to the head – can only be identified in post-mortem and football’s first case was discovered by the Scottish neuropathologist Dr Willie Stewart in the former England striker Jeff Astle. Parts of Astle’s brain will be shown on Sunday night on the BBC documentary, Alan Shearer, Dementia, Football and Me- and Telegraph Sport can reveal that a group of families have also now offered to release the brains of other former footballers when they die. They include Ernie Moss, Chesterfield’s all-time record goalscorer, who has been suffering with suspected CTE since his late fifties and can now no longer speak or complete routine tasks.  “As a family we would like to donate his brain because it is only going to help others,” said Nikki Trueman, Moss’s daughter. “It’s a heart-breaking, horrendous and harrowing thing to have to do but I do think that’s what we’ll find. All of us – my mum, my sister and me – had decided separately that it is something that needs to be done.”  Ernie Moss, Chesterfield’s all-time record goalscorer, can no longer speak Credit: Jon Super The Jeff Astle Foundation has been contacted by the families of more than 300 suffering former players, including a growing number who are ready to donate the brain of a loved one. “It is an individual decision but sadly, at this moment in time, the only way to diagnose CTE is in post-mortem,” said Dawn Astle, Jeff’s daughter. “For us, it was bad enough knowing that football killed dad but, to not know, would have been even worse. We believe that it is the tip of the iceberg.”  The decision to allow tissue samples to be screened tonight was extremely difficult. “We had to put our emotion to one side and think of the bigger picture,” said Dawn. “Dad’s brain was splitting; he was a footballer and we felt it needed to be shown.” Six cases of dementia in football The families have repeatedly stressed compensation is not in their minds but the safety of current and future generations. They also want football to acknowledge the current suffering and assist with appropriate care.  The NFL eventually agreed a $1 billion compensation settlement and the authorities in football have been warned that ignoring the issue could become increasingly costly. If there was ever a claim, the authorities would have to disclose what they have done and what evidence has been put to them. Telegraph Sport has revealed previously how a published study by the senior registrar at Guy’s Hospital recommended research as far back as 1995. The Astle inquest of 2002 also attributed his death to football. Explained | The Telegraph's Dementia campaign “It does put them at risk – it depends what recommendations have been made and what the background medical advice was,” said Steven Baylis, a partner at Lime Solicitors.  “They need to engage and volunteer the information rather than wait. Once they have done all they can, anything beyond that point, you would think they would be protected. The quicker they act, the smaller the window of potential negligence. If they front up now, that does at least minimise the risk and protect future generations.”  Following a campaign by the Astle family and Telegraph Sport, the Football Association and Professional Footballers’ Association have promised to fund new research into whether former players are suffering disproportionately with degenerative brain disease.

Exclusive: Footballers to create a 'brain bank' to deliver evidence into link between sport and dementia

Football dementia logo Families of former British footballers have agreed to create a ‘bank’ of donated brains to deliver new and potentially conclusive medical evidence into the link between football and dementia. The National Football League only acknowledged how American football has caused chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after the disease was repeatedly diagnosed following hundreds of autopsies by the Boston University ‘Brain Bank’ and a comparable body of research could now take place in the United Kingdom. The distinct tau proteins that are the hallmark of CTE – a devastating strain of dementia that is caused by repeated blows to the head – can only be identified in post-mortem and football’s first case was discovered by the Scottish neuropathologist Dr Willie Stewart in the former England striker Jeff Astle. Parts of Astle’s brain will be shown on Sunday night on the BBC documentary, Alan Shearer, Dementia, Football and Me- and Telegraph Sport can reveal that a group of families have also now offered to release the brains of other former footballers when they die. They include Ernie Moss, Chesterfield’s all-time record goalscorer, who has been suffering with suspected CTE since his late fifties and can now no longer speak or complete routine tasks.  “As a family we would like to donate his brain because it is only going to help others,” said Nikki Trueman, Moss’s daughter. “It’s a heart-breaking, horrendous and harrowing thing to have to do but I do think that’s what we’ll find. All of us – my mum, my sister and me – had decided separately that it is something that needs to be done.”  Ernie Moss, Chesterfield’s all-time record goalscorer, can no longer speak Credit: Jon Super The Jeff Astle Foundation has been contacted by the families of more than 300 suffering former players, including a growing number who are ready to donate the brain of a loved one. “It is an individual decision but sadly, at this moment in time, the only way to diagnose CTE is in post-mortem,” said Dawn Astle, Jeff’s daughter. “For us, it was bad enough knowing that football killed dad but, to not know, would have been even worse. We believe that it is the tip of the iceberg.”  The decision to allow tissue samples to be screened tonight was extremely difficult. “We had to put our emotion to one side and think of the bigger picture,” said Dawn. “Dad’s brain was splitting; he was a footballer and we felt it needed to be shown.” Six cases of dementia in football The families have repeatedly stressed compensation is not in their minds but the safety of current and future generations. They also want football to acknowledge the current suffering and assist with appropriate care.  The NFL eventually agreed a $1 billion compensation settlement and the authorities in football have been warned that ignoring the issue could become increasingly costly. If there was ever a claim, the authorities would have to disclose what they have done and what evidence has been put to them. Telegraph Sport has revealed previously how a published study by the senior registrar at Guy’s Hospital recommended research as far back as 1995. The Astle inquest of 2002 also attributed his death to football. Explained | The Telegraph's Dementia campaign “It does put them at risk – it depends what recommendations have been made and what the background medical advice was,” said Steven Baylis, a partner at Lime Solicitors.  “They need to engage and volunteer the information rather than wait. Once they have done all they can, anything beyond that point, you would think they would be protected. The quicker they act, the smaller the window of potential negligence. If they front up now, that does at least minimise the risk and protect future generations.”  Following a campaign by the Astle family and Telegraph Sport, the Football Association and Professional Footballers’ Association have promised to fund new research into whether former players are suffering disproportionately with degenerative brain disease.

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