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The Alliance of American Football continues to seek out people with past NFL ties to head their franchises. According to Alex Marvez of Sirius XM NFL Radio, former Dallas Cowboys fullback Daryl Johnson and former San Diego Chargers head coach Mike Riley are expected to be named as the General Manager and head coach of [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/20/report-daryl-johnston-mike-riley-to-head-san-antonio-aaf-team-as-g-m-head-coach/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
Report: Daryl Johnston, Mike Riley to head San Antonio AAF team as G.M., head coach
The Alliance of American Football continues to seek out people with past NFL ties to head their franchises. According to Alex Marvez of Sirius XM NFL Radio, former Dallas Cowboys fullback Daryl Johnson and former San Diego Chargers head coach Mike Riley are expected to be named as the General Manager and head coach of [more]
The Alliance of American Football continues to seek out people with past NFL ties to head their franchises. According to Alex Marvez of Sirius XM NFL Radio, former Dallas Cowboys fullback Daryl Johnson and former San Diego Chargers head coach Mike Riley are expected to be named as the General Manager and head coach of [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/20/report-daryl-johnston-mike-riley-to-head-san-antonio-aaf-team-as-g-m-head-coach/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
Report: Daryl Johnston, Mike Riley to head San Antonio AAF team as G.M., head coach
The Alliance of American Football continues to seek out people with past NFL ties to head their franchises. According to Alex Marvez of Sirius XM NFL Radio, former Dallas Cowboys fullback Daryl Johnson and former San Diego Chargers head coach Mike Riley are expected to be named as the General Manager and head coach of [more]
Speak to Taylor Twellman and you will receive a fairly blunt assessment of the various concussion protocols that have been introduced in football. “Eye candy,” says Twellman, whose professional career was prematurely ended by a serious head injury. Speak to Fifa, Uefa or the Football Association and they will insist that player welfare is their top priority and tell you all about some of the changes that have been introduced. These two contrasting characterisations have been tested in the weeks that have followed Liverpool’s Champions League defeat, culminating in a Daily Telegraph interview last Friday with Michel D’Hooghe, the chairman of Fifa’s medical committee that will have alarmed campaigners and only reinforced Twellman’s scepticism. The wider context was the calls from medical experts, as also revealed by The Telegraph, for a comprehensive overhaul of the guidelines surrounding suspected concussions. This protocol has also already been brought into sharp focus during the World Cup following a worrying incident when Peru’s Renato Tapia was knocked flat to the ground against Denmark and yet allowed to continue after only a brief check before being substituted 13 minutes later. As it stands, a referee has the power to stop a match for three minutes to allow a team doctor to complete an on-pitch assessment for suspected concussion. The referee will then only allow the injured player to continue with the authorisation of the team doctor. Christoph Kramer suffered a nasty head injury in the 2014 World Cup final Credit: Getty Images But there is a rather obvious problem here. Signs and symptoms of a concussion do not adhere to an arbitrary three-minute window. They can take hours, or even days, to emerge and certainly longer than 180 seconds. Decisions, then, often come down to educated guesswork. And this educated guesswork rests with a medic who knows that his decision whether to remove a player is both binding on the game and likely to harm his employer’s team, especially if all three substitutes have been used. You can only imagine the pressures. It can never be a perfect science but there is a quite obviously preferable alternative. They are concussion substitutes, variations of which are used in other sports, including rugby union and American football. In rugby, for example, an independent doctor has video access to identify head blows. Any signs of a concussion mean an automatic end to the player’s match. Even if there are no immediate signs of concussion, a player is removed for a 10-minute off-field assessment that will include screening tools and video replays, during which they can be replaced. As also reported by The Telegraph, Premier League doctors are now privately calling for this but, even in acknowledging that three minutes “is not enough for a complete neurological examination”, D’Hooghe has ruled it out. So, why is football different? Are the doctors somehow quicker at assessing concussion? Are they just more independent? Of course not. No medical argument was advanced, just a suggestion that teams would use any new rule as a means to effectively cheat. “I hope you don’t believe that this would be used rightly every time,” said D’Hooghe. More concerning #WorldCup2018#concussion care today! Peru's Renato Tapia is not moving when the referee arrives after a severe body-to-head impact, yet is not evaluated, & returns. When he finally stands up, FS1 commentator says, "It looks like he's fine." Watch the video: pic.twitter.com/ix8fX64ISQ— Chris Nowinski, Ph.D. (@ChrisNowinski1) June 16, 2018 At one level, he is probably right. You have only to watch the way throw-ins, free-kicks and corners are contested to know that football’s culture permits the ruthless and often cynical exploitation of every conceivable advantage. A recent conversation with one Premier League doctor certainly confirmed that. “If a team needed a goal and had used all their substitutions, I could well imagine that there are certain managers who would encourage a defender to go down with a head injury and then want to bring on a striker,” he said. But the doctor also added a crucial caveat. “Even if that danger exists, is the image of the game more important than player health? And should we not then just be thinking about ways this could not be abused?” It would not be so difficult. Lengthy bans for misuse would be one obvious necessity. Placing decisions in the hands of somebody medically independent could be another. In one sense, Fifa actually indirectly makes this exact argument in its refusal to support temporary substitutions. For if it is so unable to trust unscrupulous teams not to manipulate the situation for sporting advantage, why do they now also leave those same medical decisions in their hands? World Cup 2018 | The best of the Telegraph's coverage It is a situation that feeds into a wider concern over whether the existing concussion protocols are being vigorously upheld. Aside from the Tapia incident, research by a team of doctors into the 2014 World Cup found that, after almost two-thirds of head collisions in the tournament, there was no assessment by a healthcare personnel. The memory of Germany midfielder Christoph Kramer playing on for 14 minutes after a heavy blow to the head in the final remains shocking. Dr Willie Stewart was the neuropathologist who diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy in Jeff Astle, the former England striker, and having now begun FA-funded research into the prevalence of neurological disease among former players, is damning of the current situation. “Football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management, when the rest of sport has moved on,” he says. “The way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. Football doesn’t allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn’t allow significant time for the medics. It’s unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way.” That common-sense change will eventually arrive is surely inevitable. The great worry is that the catalyst for action will be an incident far more serious than a goalkeeper potentially costing his team the Champions League.
Why won't football follow other sports and introduce concussion subs?
Speak to Taylor Twellman and you will receive a fairly blunt assessment of the various concussion protocols that have been introduced in football. “Eye candy,” says Twellman, whose professional career was prematurely ended by a serious head injury. Speak to Fifa, Uefa or the Football Association and they will insist that player welfare is their top priority and tell you all about some of the changes that have been introduced. These two contrasting characterisations have been tested in the weeks that have followed Liverpool’s Champions League defeat, culminating in a Daily Telegraph interview last Friday with Michel D’Hooghe, the chairman of Fifa’s medical committee that will have alarmed campaigners and only reinforced Twellman’s scepticism. The wider context was the calls from medical experts, as also revealed by The Telegraph, for a comprehensive overhaul of the guidelines surrounding suspected concussions. This protocol has also already been brought into sharp focus during the World Cup following a worrying incident when Peru’s Renato Tapia was knocked flat to the ground against Denmark and yet allowed to continue after only a brief check before being substituted 13 minutes later. As it stands, a referee has the power to stop a match for three minutes to allow a team doctor to complete an on-pitch assessment for suspected concussion. The referee will then only allow the injured player to continue with the authorisation of the team doctor. Christoph Kramer suffered a nasty head injury in the 2014 World Cup final Credit: Getty Images But there is a rather obvious problem here. Signs and symptoms of a concussion do not adhere to an arbitrary three-minute window. They can take hours, or even days, to emerge and certainly longer than 180 seconds. Decisions, then, often come down to educated guesswork. And this educated guesswork rests with a medic who knows that his decision whether to remove a player is both binding on the game and likely to harm his employer’s team, especially if all three substitutes have been used. You can only imagine the pressures. It can never be a perfect science but there is a quite obviously preferable alternative. They are concussion substitutes, variations of which are used in other sports, including rugby union and American football. In rugby, for example, an independent doctor has video access to identify head blows. Any signs of a concussion mean an automatic end to the player’s match. Even if there are no immediate signs of concussion, a player is removed for a 10-minute off-field assessment that will include screening tools and video replays, during which they can be replaced. As also reported by The Telegraph, Premier League doctors are now privately calling for this but, even in acknowledging that three minutes “is not enough for a complete neurological examination”, D’Hooghe has ruled it out. So, why is football different? Are the doctors somehow quicker at assessing concussion? Are they just more independent? Of course not. No medical argument was advanced, just a suggestion that teams would use any new rule as a means to effectively cheat. “I hope you don’t believe that this would be used rightly every time,” said D’Hooghe. More concerning #WorldCup2018#concussion care today! Peru's Renato Tapia is not moving when the referee arrives after a severe body-to-head impact, yet is not evaluated, & returns. When he finally stands up, FS1 commentator says, "It looks like he's fine." Watch the video: pic.twitter.com/ix8fX64ISQ— Chris Nowinski, Ph.D. (@ChrisNowinski1) June 16, 2018 At one level, he is probably right. You have only to watch the way throw-ins, free-kicks and corners are contested to know that football’s culture permits the ruthless and often cynical exploitation of every conceivable advantage. A recent conversation with one Premier League doctor certainly confirmed that. “If a team needed a goal and had used all their substitutions, I could well imagine that there are certain managers who would encourage a defender to go down with a head injury and then want to bring on a striker,” he said. But the doctor also added a crucial caveat. “Even if that danger exists, is the image of the game more important than player health? And should we not then just be thinking about ways this could not be abused?” It would not be so difficult. Lengthy bans for misuse would be one obvious necessity. Placing decisions in the hands of somebody medically independent could be another. In one sense, Fifa actually indirectly makes this exact argument in its refusal to support temporary substitutions. For if it is so unable to trust unscrupulous teams not to manipulate the situation for sporting advantage, why do they now also leave those same medical decisions in their hands? World Cup 2018 | The best of the Telegraph's coverage It is a situation that feeds into a wider concern over whether the existing concussion protocols are being vigorously upheld. Aside from the Tapia incident, research by a team of doctors into the 2014 World Cup found that, after almost two-thirds of head collisions in the tournament, there was no assessment by a healthcare personnel. The memory of Germany midfielder Christoph Kramer playing on for 14 minutes after a heavy blow to the head in the final remains shocking. Dr Willie Stewart was the neuropathologist who diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy in Jeff Astle, the former England striker, and having now begun FA-funded research into the prevalence of neurological disease among former players, is damning of the current situation. “Football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management, when the rest of sport has moved on,” he says. “The way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. Football doesn’t allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn’t allow significant time for the medics. It’s unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way.” That common-sense change will eventually arrive is surely inevitable. The great worry is that the catalyst for action will be an incident far more serious than a goalkeeper potentially costing his team the Champions League.
Speak to Taylor Twellman and you will receive a fairly blunt assessment of the various concussion protocols that have been introduced in football. “Eye candy,” says Twellman, whose professional career was prematurely ended by a serious head injury. Speak to Fifa, Uefa or the Football Association and they will insist that player welfare is their top priority and tell you all about some of the changes that have been introduced. These two contrasting characterisations have been tested in the weeks that have followed Liverpool’s Champions League defeat, culminating in a Daily Telegraph interview last Friday with Michel D’Hooghe, the chairman of Fifa’s medical committee that will have alarmed campaigners and only reinforced Twellman’s scepticism. The wider context was the calls from medical experts, as also revealed by The Telegraph, for a comprehensive overhaul of the guidelines surrounding suspected concussions. This protocol has also already been brought into sharp focus during the World Cup following a worrying incident when Peru’s Renato Tapia was knocked flat to the ground against Denmark and yet allowed to continue after only a brief check before being substituted 13 minutes later. As it stands, a referee has the power to stop a match for three minutes to allow a team doctor to complete an on-pitch assessment for suspected concussion. The referee will then only allow the injured player to continue with the authorisation of the team doctor. Christoph Kramer suffered a nasty head injury in the 2014 World Cup final Credit: Getty Images But there is a rather obvious problem here. Signs and symptoms of a concussion do not adhere to an arbitrary three-minute window. They can take hours, or even days, to emerge and certainly longer than 180 seconds. Decisions, then, often come down to educated guesswork. And this educated guesswork rests with a medic who knows that his decision whether to remove a player is both binding on the game and likely to harm his employer’s team, especially if all three substitutes have been used. You can only imagine the pressures. It can never be a perfect science but there is a quite obviously preferable alternative. They are concussion substitutes, variations of which are used in other sports, including rugby union and American football. In rugby, for example, an independent doctor has video access to identify head blows. Any signs of a concussion mean an automatic end to the player’s match. Even if there are no immediate signs of concussion, a player is removed for a 10-minute off-field assessment that will include screening tools and video replays, during which they can be replaced. As also reported by The Telegraph, Premier League doctors are now privately calling for this but, even in acknowledging that three minutes “is not enough for a complete neurological examination”, D’Hooghe has ruled it out. So, why is football different? Are the doctors somehow quicker at assessing concussion? Are they just more independent? Of course not. No medical argument was advanced, just a suggestion that teams would use any new rule as a means to effectively cheat. “I hope you don’t believe that this would be used rightly every time,” said D’Hooghe. More concerning #WorldCup2018#concussion care today! Peru's Renato Tapia is not moving when the referee arrives after a severe body-to-head impact, yet is not evaluated, & returns. When he finally stands up, FS1 commentator says, "It looks like he's fine." Watch the video: pic.twitter.com/ix8fX64ISQ— Chris Nowinski, Ph.D. (@ChrisNowinski1) June 16, 2018 At one level, he is probably right. You have only to watch the way throw-ins, free-kicks and corners are contested to know that football’s culture permits the ruthless and often cynical exploitation of every conceivable advantage. A recent conversation with one Premier League doctor certainly confirmed that. “If a team needed a goal and had used all their substitutions, I could well imagine that there are certain managers who would encourage a defender to go down with a head injury and then want to bring on a striker,” he said. But the doctor also added a crucial caveat. “Even if that danger exists, is the image of the game more important than player health? And should we not then just be thinking about ways this could not be abused?” It would not be so difficult. Lengthy bans for misuse would be one obvious necessity. Placing decisions in the hands of somebody medically independent could be another. In one sense, Fifa actually indirectly makes this exact argument in its refusal to support temporary substitutions. For if it is so unable to trust unscrupulous teams not to manipulate the situation for sporting advantage, why do they now also leave those same medical decisions in their hands? World Cup 2018 | The best of the Telegraph's coverage It is a situation that feeds into a wider concern over whether the existing concussion protocols are being vigorously upheld. Aside from the Tapia incident, research by a team of doctors into the 2014 World Cup found that, after almost two-thirds of head collisions in the tournament, there was no assessment by a healthcare personnel. The memory of Germany midfielder Christoph Kramer playing on for 14 minutes after a heavy blow to the head in the final remains shocking. Dr Willie Stewart was the neuropathologist who diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy in Jeff Astle, the former England striker, and having now begun FA-funded research into the prevalence of neurological disease among former players, is damning of the current situation. “Football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management, when the rest of sport has moved on,” he says. “The way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. Football doesn’t allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn’t allow significant time for the medics. It’s unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way.” That common-sense change will eventually arrive is surely inevitable. The great worry is that the catalyst for action will be an incident far more serious than a goalkeeper potentially costing his team the Champions League.
Why won't football follow other sports and introduce concussion subs?
Speak to Taylor Twellman and you will receive a fairly blunt assessment of the various concussion protocols that have been introduced in football. “Eye candy,” says Twellman, whose professional career was prematurely ended by a serious head injury. Speak to Fifa, Uefa or the Football Association and they will insist that player welfare is their top priority and tell you all about some of the changes that have been introduced. These two contrasting characterisations have been tested in the weeks that have followed Liverpool’s Champions League defeat, culminating in a Daily Telegraph interview last Friday with Michel D’Hooghe, the chairman of Fifa’s medical committee that will have alarmed campaigners and only reinforced Twellman’s scepticism. The wider context was the calls from medical experts, as also revealed by The Telegraph, for a comprehensive overhaul of the guidelines surrounding suspected concussions. This protocol has also already been brought into sharp focus during the World Cup following a worrying incident when Peru’s Renato Tapia was knocked flat to the ground against Denmark and yet allowed to continue after only a brief check before being substituted 13 minutes later. As it stands, a referee has the power to stop a match for three minutes to allow a team doctor to complete an on-pitch assessment for suspected concussion. The referee will then only allow the injured player to continue with the authorisation of the team doctor. Christoph Kramer suffered a nasty head injury in the 2014 World Cup final Credit: Getty Images But there is a rather obvious problem here. Signs and symptoms of a concussion do not adhere to an arbitrary three-minute window. They can take hours, or even days, to emerge and certainly longer than 180 seconds. Decisions, then, often come down to educated guesswork. And this educated guesswork rests with a medic who knows that his decision whether to remove a player is both binding on the game and likely to harm his employer’s team, especially if all three substitutes have been used. You can only imagine the pressures. It can never be a perfect science but there is a quite obviously preferable alternative. They are concussion substitutes, variations of which are used in other sports, including rugby union and American football. In rugby, for example, an independent doctor has video access to identify head blows. Any signs of a concussion mean an automatic end to the player’s match. Even if there are no immediate signs of concussion, a player is removed for a 10-minute off-field assessment that will include screening tools and video replays, during which they can be replaced. As also reported by The Telegraph, Premier League doctors are now privately calling for this but, even in acknowledging that three minutes “is not enough for a complete neurological examination”, D’Hooghe has ruled it out. So, why is football different? Are the doctors somehow quicker at assessing concussion? Are they just more independent? Of course not. No medical argument was advanced, just a suggestion that teams would use any new rule as a means to effectively cheat. “I hope you don’t believe that this would be used rightly every time,” said D’Hooghe. More concerning #WorldCup2018#concussion care today! Peru's Renato Tapia is not moving when the referee arrives after a severe body-to-head impact, yet is not evaluated, & returns. When he finally stands up, FS1 commentator says, "It looks like he's fine." Watch the video: pic.twitter.com/ix8fX64ISQ— Chris Nowinski, Ph.D. (@ChrisNowinski1) June 16, 2018 At one level, he is probably right. You have only to watch the way throw-ins, free-kicks and corners are contested to know that football’s culture permits the ruthless and often cynical exploitation of every conceivable advantage. A recent conversation with one Premier League doctor certainly confirmed that. “If a team needed a goal and had used all their substitutions, I could well imagine that there are certain managers who would encourage a defender to go down with a head injury and then want to bring on a striker,” he said. But the doctor also added a crucial caveat. “Even if that danger exists, is the image of the game more important than player health? And should we not then just be thinking about ways this could not be abused?” It would not be so difficult. Lengthy bans for misuse would be one obvious necessity. Placing decisions in the hands of somebody medically independent could be another. In one sense, Fifa actually indirectly makes this exact argument in its refusal to support temporary substitutions. For if it is so unable to trust unscrupulous teams not to manipulate the situation for sporting advantage, why do they now also leave those same medical decisions in their hands? World Cup 2018 | The best of the Telegraph's coverage It is a situation that feeds into a wider concern over whether the existing concussion protocols are being vigorously upheld. Aside from the Tapia incident, research by a team of doctors into the 2014 World Cup found that, after almost two-thirds of head collisions in the tournament, there was no assessment by a healthcare personnel. The memory of Germany midfielder Christoph Kramer playing on for 14 minutes after a heavy blow to the head in the final remains shocking. Dr Willie Stewart was the neuropathologist who diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy in Jeff Astle, the former England striker, and having now begun FA-funded research into the prevalence of neurological disease among former players, is damning of the current situation. “Football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management, when the rest of sport has moved on,” he says. “The way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. Football doesn’t allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn’t allow significant time for the medics. It’s unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way.” That common-sense change will eventually arrive is surely inevitable. The great worry is that the catalyst for action will be an incident far more serious than a goalkeeper potentially costing his team the Champions League.
<p>Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.</p>
South American football fever grips Moscow

Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.

<p>Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.</p>
South American football fever grips Moscow

Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.

<p>Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.</p>
South American football fever grips Moscow

Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.

When Mexico kick-off their World Cup today against defending champions Germany, one particular family from Liverpool will be taking a very special interest. It is now 21 years since a 35-year-old Colombian student by the name of Juan Carlos Osorio first knocked on the McManus family’s front door in Crown Road, just outside Liverpool’s Melwood training base. Osorio initially asked to borrow a ladder or a table so that he could gain a better view of Liverpool training and, having so impressed the family with his politeness, they ultimately agreed to his suggestion that he should move in. For the next two years, he would secretly watch Gerard Houllier and Roy Evans at work, making extensive notes about the practicalities and details of their training sessions. Osorio had sold the small gym he owned in New York - as well even as a car and his watch - to fund his move to England. An adventure that would go from studying science and football at John Moores University to jobs in Major League Soccer and Manchester City as a fitness coach has since taken in managerial positions in Colombia, the United States, Honduras, Mexico and Brazil before the job of Mexico national team manager since 2015. Juan Carlos Osorio has coached Mexico since 2015 Credit: AP Osorio duly led Mexico to the top of their CONCACAF World Cup qualifying section for the first time since 1997 and, with 31 wins from 47 matches, hopes are high that they can now finally get past the last 16 on foreign soil. Under him, Mexico have also reached the quarter-final of the Copa America and the semi-finals of the Confederations Cup. A major curiosity then of what would seem like a resoundingly successful tenure is that he remains such a polarising figure back in Mexico. The players are certainly behind him - all-time record scorer Javier Hernandez describes him as “like a genius because they live in a completely different world than ourselves” - but a sometimes overly deep and analytical response to questions has created difficulties in connecting with fans. One recent query about how often he runs apparently prompted a lengthy explanation about the precise details of the training zones he must reach in order to strengthen his heart for such a pressurised job. Such scrutiny, though, is hardly surprising and, in the 12 years that Joachim Loew has been managing Germany, Osorio is Mexico’s 12th coach. To have lasted almost three years is already good going. World Cup whatsapp promo The biggest criticism relates to how frequently he rotates his team; something that he largely attributes to the time he spent observing Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United when he was working at City between 2001 and 2005. For all the focus that there has always been on Ferguson’s sometimes explosive man-management style, those who worked closely with him will often tell you that his planning in terms of selection was most impressive. Every preferred rotation, whether for tactical or physical reasons, would be scheduled weeks in advance and Osorio also strongly believes in the benefits of adapting according to the specific strengths and weaknesses of an opponent. Manchester City were nothing like the super-power they have become and so Ferguson was relaxed about allowing such an enthusiastic personality come and watch how he worked. “The rotation and the tendency of me to give everyone an opportunity came from Mr Ferguson,” said Osorio. "He would say just a couple of things, but they were worth me waiting the whole two hours there.” Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio poses for a portrait Credit: FIFA Osorio regards his experiences in England as formative, particularly as Latin American football places such a heavy emphasis on short passing and dribbling. He has tried to blend these different philosophies in his teams and there is also a heavy emphasis on aerial strength and set-piece planning. One striking example is in defending corners and free-kicks where, in order to preserve the potential for rapid counter-attacks and to simplify the job of his defenders, he will position as many as three players on the half-way line and two on the edge of the penalty area. Shaun Wright-Phillips worked with Osorio at Manchester City and recently told ESPN that his philosophy was “unique” among the coaches he worked with in England. Wright-Phillips also recalled how, after joining Chelsea under Jose Mourinho, Osorio would stay in contact to regularly ask questions about the Portuguese’s methods. Osorio is now bullish about what Mexico can achieve over the next four weeks. “We have a right to shine and believe we can go to the final,” he said. It would be some journey from those years studying in Liverpool but, whatever happens, Tom McManus believes that he has already taught his family something precious. "What he showed to me and I think to our two boys is that if you want to achieve anything in life, you've got to be single-minded and totally determined to go for it,” he said. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Juan Carlos Osorio's journey from secretly watching Liverpool train to coaching Mexico at the World Cup
When Mexico kick-off their World Cup today against defending champions Germany, one particular family from Liverpool will be taking a very special interest. It is now 21 years since a 35-year-old Colombian student by the name of Juan Carlos Osorio first knocked on the McManus family’s front door in Crown Road, just outside Liverpool’s Melwood training base. Osorio initially asked to borrow a ladder or a table so that he could gain a better view of Liverpool training and, having so impressed the family with his politeness, they ultimately agreed to his suggestion that he should move in. For the next two years, he would secretly watch Gerard Houllier and Roy Evans at work, making extensive notes about the practicalities and details of their training sessions. Osorio had sold the small gym he owned in New York - as well even as a car and his watch - to fund his move to England. An adventure that would go from studying science and football at John Moores University to jobs in Major League Soccer and Manchester City as a fitness coach has since taken in managerial positions in Colombia, the United States, Honduras, Mexico and Brazil before the job of Mexico national team manager since 2015. Juan Carlos Osorio has coached Mexico since 2015 Credit: AP Osorio duly led Mexico to the top of their CONCACAF World Cup qualifying section for the first time since 1997 and, with 31 wins from 47 matches, hopes are high that they can now finally get past the last 16 on foreign soil. Under him, Mexico have also reached the quarter-final of the Copa America and the semi-finals of the Confederations Cup. A major curiosity then of what would seem like a resoundingly successful tenure is that he remains such a polarising figure back in Mexico. The players are certainly behind him - all-time record scorer Javier Hernandez describes him as “like a genius because they live in a completely different world than ourselves” - but a sometimes overly deep and analytical response to questions has created difficulties in connecting with fans. One recent query about how often he runs apparently prompted a lengthy explanation about the precise details of the training zones he must reach in order to strengthen his heart for such a pressurised job. Such scrutiny, though, is hardly surprising and, in the 12 years that Joachim Loew has been managing Germany, Osorio is Mexico’s 12th coach. To have lasted almost three years is already good going. World Cup whatsapp promo The biggest criticism relates to how frequently he rotates his team; something that he largely attributes to the time he spent observing Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United when he was working at City between 2001 and 2005. For all the focus that there has always been on Ferguson’s sometimes explosive man-management style, those who worked closely with him will often tell you that his planning in terms of selection was most impressive. Every preferred rotation, whether for tactical or physical reasons, would be scheduled weeks in advance and Osorio also strongly believes in the benefits of adapting according to the specific strengths and weaknesses of an opponent. Manchester City were nothing like the super-power they have become and so Ferguson was relaxed about allowing such an enthusiastic personality come and watch how he worked. “The rotation and the tendency of me to give everyone an opportunity came from Mr Ferguson,” said Osorio. "He would say just a couple of things, but they were worth me waiting the whole two hours there.” Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio poses for a portrait Credit: FIFA Osorio regards his experiences in England as formative, particularly as Latin American football places such a heavy emphasis on short passing and dribbling. He has tried to blend these different philosophies in his teams and there is also a heavy emphasis on aerial strength and set-piece planning. One striking example is in defending corners and free-kicks where, in order to preserve the potential for rapid counter-attacks and to simplify the job of his defenders, he will position as many as three players on the half-way line and two on the edge of the penalty area. Shaun Wright-Phillips worked with Osorio at Manchester City and recently told ESPN that his philosophy was “unique” among the coaches he worked with in England. Wright-Phillips also recalled how, after joining Chelsea under Jose Mourinho, Osorio would stay in contact to regularly ask questions about the Portuguese’s methods. Osorio is now bullish about what Mexico can achieve over the next four weeks. “We have a right to shine and believe we can go to the final,” he said. It would be some journey from those years studying in Liverpool but, whatever happens, Tom McManus believes that he has already taught his family something precious. "What he showed to me and I think to our two boys is that if you want to achieve anything in life, you've got to be single-minded and totally determined to go for it,” he said. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
When Mexico kick-off their World Cup today against defending champions Germany, one particular family from Liverpool will be taking a very special interest. It is now 21 years since a 35-year-old Colombian student by the name of Juan Carlos Osorio first knocked on the McManus family’s front door in Crown Road, just outside Liverpool’s Melwood training base. Osorio initially asked to borrow a ladder or a table so that he could gain a better view of Liverpool training and, having so impressed the family with his politeness, they ultimately agreed to his suggestion that he should move in. For the next two years, he would secretly watch Gerard Houllier and Roy Evans at work, making extensive notes about the practicalities and details of their training sessions. Osorio had sold the small gym he owned in New York - as well even as a car and his watch - to fund his move to England. An adventure that would go from studying science and football at John Moores University to jobs in Major League Soccer and Manchester City as a fitness coach has since taken in managerial positions in Colombia, the United States, Honduras, Mexico and Brazil before the job of Mexico national team manager since 2015. Juan Carlos Osorio has coached Mexico since 2015 Credit: AP Osorio duly led Mexico to the top of their CONCACAF World Cup qualifying section for the first time since 1997 and, with 31 wins from 47 matches, hopes are high that they can now finally get past the last 16 on foreign soil. Under him, Mexico have also reached the quarter-final of the Copa America and the semi-finals of the Confederations Cup. A major curiosity then of what would seem like a resoundingly successful tenure is that he remains such a polarising figure back in Mexico. The players are certainly behind him - all-time record scorer Javier Hernandez describes him as “like a genius because they live in a completely different world than ourselves” - but a sometimes overly deep and analytical response to questions has created difficulties in connecting with fans. One recent query about how often he runs apparently prompted a lengthy explanation about the precise details of the training zones he must reach in order to strengthen his heart for such a pressurised job. Such scrutiny, though, is hardly surprising and, in the 12 years that Joachim Loew has been managing Germany, Osorio is Mexico’s 12th coach. To have lasted almost three years is already good going. World Cup whatsapp promo The biggest criticism relates to how frequently he rotates his team; something that he largely attributes to the time he spent observing Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United when he was working at City between 2001 and 2005. For all the focus that there has always been on Ferguson’s sometimes explosive man-management style, those who worked closely with him will often tell you that his planning in terms of selection was most impressive. Every preferred rotation, whether for tactical or physical reasons, would be scheduled weeks in advance and Osorio also strongly believes in the benefits of adapting according to the specific strengths and weaknesses of an opponent. Manchester City were nothing like the super-power they have become and so Ferguson was relaxed about allowing such an enthusiastic personality come and watch how he worked. “The rotation and the tendency of me to give everyone an opportunity came from Mr Ferguson,” said Osorio. "He would say just a couple of things, but they were worth me waiting the whole two hours there.” Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio poses for a portrait Credit: FIFA Osorio regards his experiences in England as formative, particularly as Latin American football places such a heavy emphasis on short passing and dribbling. He has tried to blend these different philosophies in his teams and there is also a heavy emphasis on aerial strength and set-piece planning. One striking example is in defending corners and free-kicks where, in order to preserve the potential for rapid counter-attacks and to simplify the job of his defenders, he will position as many as three players on the half-way line and two on the edge of the penalty area. Shaun Wright-Phillips worked with Osorio at Manchester City and recently told ESPN that his philosophy was “unique” among the coaches he worked with in England. Wright-Phillips also recalled how, after joining Chelsea under Jose Mourinho, Osorio would stay in contact to regularly ask questions about the Portuguese’s methods. Osorio is now bullish about what Mexico can achieve over the next four weeks. “We have a right to shine and believe we can go to the final,” he said. It would be some journey from those years studying in Liverpool but, whatever happens, Tom McManus believes that he has already taught his family something precious. "What he showed to me and I think to our two boys is that if you want to achieve anything in life, you've got to be single-minded and totally determined to go for it,” he said. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Juan Carlos Osorio's journey from secretly watching Liverpool train to coaching Mexico at the World Cup
When Mexico kick-off their World Cup today against defending champions Germany, one particular family from Liverpool will be taking a very special interest. It is now 21 years since a 35-year-old Colombian student by the name of Juan Carlos Osorio first knocked on the McManus family’s front door in Crown Road, just outside Liverpool’s Melwood training base. Osorio initially asked to borrow a ladder or a table so that he could gain a better view of Liverpool training and, having so impressed the family with his politeness, they ultimately agreed to his suggestion that he should move in. For the next two years, he would secretly watch Gerard Houllier and Roy Evans at work, making extensive notes about the practicalities and details of their training sessions. Osorio had sold the small gym he owned in New York - as well even as a car and his watch - to fund his move to England. An adventure that would go from studying science and football at John Moores University to jobs in Major League Soccer and Manchester City as a fitness coach has since taken in managerial positions in Colombia, the United States, Honduras, Mexico and Brazil before the job of Mexico national team manager since 2015. Juan Carlos Osorio has coached Mexico since 2015 Credit: AP Osorio duly led Mexico to the top of their CONCACAF World Cup qualifying section for the first time since 1997 and, with 31 wins from 47 matches, hopes are high that they can now finally get past the last 16 on foreign soil. Under him, Mexico have also reached the quarter-final of the Copa America and the semi-finals of the Confederations Cup. A major curiosity then of what would seem like a resoundingly successful tenure is that he remains such a polarising figure back in Mexico. The players are certainly behind him - all-time record scorer Javier Hernandez describes him as “like a genius because they live in a completely different world than ourselves” - but a sometimes overly deep and analytical response to questions has created difficulties in connecting with fans. One recent query about how often he runs apparently prompted a lengthy explanation about the precise details of the training zones he must reach in order to strengthen his heart for such a pressurised job. Such scrutiny, though, is hardly surprising and, in the 12 years that Joachim Loew has been managing Germany, Osorio is Mexico’s 12th coach. To have lasted almost three years is already good going. World Cup whatsapp promo The biggest criticism relates to how frequently he rotates his team; something that he largely attributes to the time he spent observing Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United when he was working at City between 2001 and 2005. For all the focus that there has always been on Ferguson’s sometimes explosive man-management style, those who worked closely with him will often tell you that his planning in terms of selection was most impressive. Every preferred rotation, whether for tactical or physical reasons, would be scheduled weeks in advance and Osorio also strongly believes in the benefits of adapting according to the specific strengths and weaknesses of an opponent. Manchester City were nothing like the super-power they have become and so Ferguson was relaxed about allowing such an enthusiastic personality come and watch how he worked. “The rotation and the tendency of me to give everyone an opportunity came from Mr Ferguson,” said Osorio. "He would say just a couple of things, but they were worth me waiting the whole two hours there.” Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio poses for a portrait Credit: FIFA Osorio regards his experiences in England as formative, particularly as Latin American football places such a heavy emphasis on short passing and dribbling. He has tried to blend these different philosophies in his teams and there is also a heavy emphasis on aerial strength and set-piece planning. One striking example is in defending corners and free-kicks where, in order to preserve the potential for rapid counter-attacks and to simplify the job of his defenders, he will position as many as three players on the half-way line and two on the edge of the penalty area. Shaun Wright-Phillips worked with Osorio at Manchester City and recently told ESPN that his philosophy was “unique” among the coaches he worked with in England. Wright-Phillips also recalled how, after joining Chelsea under Jose Mourinho, Osorio would stay in contact to regularly ask questions about the Portuguese’s methods. Osorio is now bullish about what Mexico can achieve over the next four weeks. “We have a right to shine and believe we can go to the final,” he said. It would be some journey from those years studying in Liverpool but, whatever happens, Tom McManus believes that he has already taught his family something precious. "What he showed to me and I think to our two boys is that if you want to achieve anything in life, you've got to be single-minded and totally determined to go for it,” he said. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
When Mexico kick-off their World Cup today against defending champions Germany, one particular family from Liverpool will be taking a very special interest. It is now 21 years since a 35-year-old Colombian student by the name of Juan Carlos Osorio first knocked on the McManus family’s front door in Crown Road, just outside Liverpool’s Melwood training base. Osorio initially asked to borrow a ladder or a table so that he could gain a better view of Liverpool training and, having so impressed the family with his politeness, they ultimately agreed to his suggestion that he should move in. For the next two years, he would secretly watch Gerard Houllier and Roy Evans at work, making extensive notes about the practicalities and details of their training sessions. Osorio had sold the small gym he owned in New York - as well even as a car and his watch - to fund his move to England. An adventure that would go from studying science and football at John Moores University to jobs in Major League Soccer and Manchester City as a fitness coach has since taken in managerial positions in Colombia, the United States, Honduras, Mexico and Brazil before the job of Mexico national team manager since 2015. Juan Carlos Osorio has coached Mexico since 2015 Credit: AP Osorio duly led Mexico to the top of their CONCACAF World Cup qualifying section for the first time since 1997 and, with 31 wins from 47 matches, hopes are high that they can now finally get past the last 16 on foreign soil. Under him, Mexico have also reached the quarter-final of the Copa America and the semi-finals of the Confederations Cup. A major curiosity then of what would seem like a resoundingly successful tenure is that he remains such a polarising figure back in Mexico. The players are certainly behind him - all-time record scorer Javier Hernandez describes him as “like a genius because they live in a completely different world than ourselves” - but a sometimes overly deep and analytical response to questions has created difficulties in connecting with fans. One recent query about how often he runs apparently prompted a lengthy explanation about the precise details of the training zones he must reach in order to strengthen his heart for such a pressurised job. Such scrutiny, though, is hardly surprising and, in the 12 years that Joachim Loew has been managing Germany, Osorio is Mexico’s 12th coach. To have lasted almost three years is already good going. World Cup whatsapp promo The biggest criticism relates to how frequently he rotates his team; something that he largely attributes to the time he spent observing Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United when he was working at City between 2001 and 2005. For all the focus that there has always been on Ferguson’s sometimes explosive man-management style, those who worked closely with him will often tell you that his planning in terms of selection was most impressive. Every preferred rotation, whether for tactical or physical reasons, would be scheduled weeks in advance and Osorio also strongly believes in the benefits of adapting according to the specific strengths and weaknesses of an opponent. Manchester City were nothing like the super-power they have become and so Ferguson was relaxed about allowing such an enthusiastic personality come and watch how he worked. “The rotation and the tendency of me to give everyone an opportunity came from Mr Ferguson,” said Osorio. "He would say just a couple of things, but they were worth me waiting the whole two hours there.” Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio poses for a portrait Credit: FIFA Osorio regards his experiences in England as formative, particularly as Latin American football places such a heavy emphasis on short passing and dribbling. He has tried to blend these different philosophies in his teams and there is also a heavy emphasis on aerial strength and set-piece planning. One striking example is in defending corners and free-kicks where, in order to preserve the potential for rapid counter-attacks and to simplify the job of his defenders, he will position as many as three players on the half-way line and two on the edge of the penalty area. Shaun Wright-Phillips worked with Osorio at Manchester City and recently told ESPN that his philosophy was “unique” among the coaches he worked with in England. Wright-Phillips also recalled how, after joining Chelsea under Jose Mourinho, Osorio would stay in contact to regularly ask questions about the Portuguese’s methods. Osorio is now bullish about what Mexico can achieve over the next four weeks. “We have a right to shine and believe we can go to the final,” he said. It would be some journey from those years studying in Liverpool but, whatever happens, Tom McManus believes that he has already taught his family something precious. "What he showed to me and I think to our two boys is that if you want to achieve anything in life, you've got to be single-minded and totally determined to go for it,” he said. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Juan Carlos Osorio's journey from secretly watching Liverpool train to coaching Mexico at the World Cup
When Mexico kick-off their World Cup today against defending champions Germany, one particular family from Liverpool will be taking a very special interest. It is now 21 years since a 35-year-old Colombian student by the name of Juan Carlos Osorio first knocked on the McManus family’s front door in Crown Road, just outside Liverpool’s Melwood training base. Osorio initially asked to borrow a ladder or a table so that he could gain a better view of Liverpool training and, having so impressed the family with his politeness, they ultimately agreed to his suggestion that he should move in. For the next two years, he would secretly watch Gerard Houllier and Roy Evans at work, making extensive notes about the practicalities and details of their training sessions. Osorio had sold the small gym he owned in New York - as well even as a car and his watch - to fund his move to England. An adventure that would go from studying science and football at John Moores University to jobs in Major League Soccer and Manchester City as a fitness coach has since taken in managerial positions in Colombia, the United States, Honduras, Mexico and Brazil before the job of Mexico national team manager since 2015. Juan Carlos Osorio has coached Mexico since 2015 Credit: AP Osorio duly led Mexico to the top of their CONCACAF World Cup qualifying section for the first time since 1997 and, with 31 wins from 47 matches, hopes are high that they can now finally get past the last 16 on foreign soil. Under him, Mexico have also reached the quarter-final of the Copa America and the semi-finals of the Confederations Cup. A major curiosity then of what would seem like a resoundingly successful tenure is that he remains such a polarising figure back in Mexico. The players are certainly behind him - all-time record scorer Javier Hernandez describes him as “like a genius because they live in a completely different world than ourselves” - but a sometimes overly deep and analytical response to questions has created difficulties in connecting with fans. One recent query about how often he runs apparently prompted a lengthy explanation about the precise details of the training zones he must reach in order to strengthen his heart for such a pressurised job. Such scrutiny, though, is hardly surprising and, in the 12 years that Joachim Loew has been managing Germany, Osorio is Mexico’s 12th coach. To have lasted almost three years is already good going. World Cup whatsapp promo The biggest criticism relates to how frequently he rotates his team; something that he largely attributes to the time he spent observing Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United when he was working at City between 2001 and 2005. For all the focus that there has always been on Ferguson’s sometimes explosive man-management style, those who worked closely with him will often tell you that his planning in terms of selection was most impressive. Every preferred rotation, whether for tactical or physical reasons, would be scheduled weeks in advance and Osorio also strongly believes in the benefits of adapting according to the specific strengths and weaknesses of an opponent. Manchester City were nothing like the super-power they have become and so Ferguson was relaxed about allowing such an enthusiastic personality come and watch how he worked. “The rotation and the tendency of me to give everyone an opportunity came from Mr Ferguson,” said Osorio. "He would say just a couple of things, but they were worth me waiting the whole two hours there.” Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio poses for a portrait Credit: FIFA Osorio regards his experiences in England as formative, particularly as Latin American football places such a heavy emphasis on short passing and dribbling. He has tried to blend these different philosophies in his teams and there is also a heavy emphasis on aerial strength and set-piece planning. One striking example is in defending corners and free-kicks where, in order to preserve the potential for rapid counter-attacks and to simplify the job of his defenders, he will position as many as three players on the half-way line and two on the edge of the penalty area. Shaun Wright-Phillips worked with Osorio at Manchester City and recently told ESPN that his philosophy was “unique” among the coaches he worked with in England. Wright-Phillips also recalled how, after joining Chelsea under Jose Mourinho, Osorio would stay in contact to regularly ask questions about the Portuguese’s methods. Osorio is now bullish about what Mexico can achieve over the next four weeks. “We have a right to shine and believe we can go to the final,” he said. It would be some journey from those years studying in Liverpool but, whatever happens, Tom McManus believes that he has already taught his family something precious. "What he showed to me and I think to our two boys is that if you want to achieve anything in life, you've got to be single-minded and totally determined to go for it,” he said. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
South American football fever grips Moscow
Tens of thousands of South Americans have flocked to Moscow for the World Cup and become the most visible group of visitors so far, with Peruvian, Mexican and Argentinian chants reverberating around the Russian capital.
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thousands of dollars in equipment stolen from young Orange County athletes
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thousands of dollars in equipment stolen from young Orange County athletes
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thousands of dollars in equipment stolen from young Orange County athletes
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Thousands of dollars in equipment stolen from young Orange County athletes
Thieves stole thousands of dollars worth of equipment belonging to the Fullerton Bears Junior All American Football and Cheer League.
Marcus Rashford missed England training for a second successive day and is now a doubt for Monday’s opening World Cup Group G fixture against Tunisia. Although both Rashford and the Football Association are playing down the extent of the knee injury - described as a ‘slight knock’ - the forward stayed behind at the team hotel while the rest of the squad boarded the bus for the short journey to their training facility at Zelenogorsk. Rashford sustained the injury during England’s final training session at St George’s Park on Monday before heading to Russia. The 20 year-old did not train on Wednesday and was working in the gym on his own on Thursday while the squad were put through their paces. It means Rashford has only two days to prove his fitness before England fly to Volgograd on Sunday to prepare for the Tunisia match. The forward was not expected to start the match, with Raheem Sterling due to be selected ahead of him, but was impressive in England’s final warm-up game against Costa Rica and had been pushing for a place. England’s training involved a warm-up exercise with the players playing a version of American Football using a Vortex football - a kind of American Football-shaped ball with a tail that makes a whistling noise when thrown like a quarter-back. The tail acts as a hand-grip and also allows the ball to be thrown further and the players split into teams and were not allowed to run with it, having to pass the ball and then move. England get creative in training Credit: getty images Before they started training England held a minute’s silence to mark the first anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire, in which 72 people lost their lives, a disaster that has been supported by the FA and players, in particular Raheem Sterling who, of course, started his career at Queen’s Park Rangers. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Marcus Rashford a doubt for England's opening World Cup clash against Tunisia as he misses training again
Marcus Rashford missed England training for a second successive day and is now a doubt for Monday’s opening World Cup Group G fixture against Tunisia. Although both Rashford and the Football Association are playing down the extent of the knee injury - described as a ‘slight knock’ - the forward stayed behind at the team hotel while the rest of the squad boarded the bus for the short journey to their training facility at Zelenogorsk. Rashford sustained the injury during England’s final training session at St George’s Park on Monday before heading to Russia. The 20 year-old did not train on Wednesday and was working in the gym on his own on Thursday while the squad were put through their paces. It means Rashford has only two days to prove his fitness before England fly to Volgograd on Sunday to prepare for the Tunisia match. The forward was not expected to start the match, with Raheem Sterling due to be selected ahead of him, but was impressive in England’s final warm-up game against Costa Rica and had been pushing for a place. England’s training involved a warm-up exercise with the players playing a version of American Football using a Vortex football - a kind of American Football-shaped ball with a tail that makes a whistling noise when thrown like a quarter-back. The tail acts as a hand-grip and also allows the ball to be thrown further and the players split into teams and were not allowed to run with it, having to pass the ball and then move. England get creative in training Credit: getty images Before they started training England held a minute’s silence to mark the first anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire, in which 72 people lost their lives, a disaster that has been supported by the FA and players, in particular Raheem Sterling who, of course, started his career at Queen’s Park Rangers. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Marcus Rashford missed England training for a second successive day and is now a doubt for Monday’s opening World Cup Group G fixture against Tunisia. Although both Rashford and the Football Association are playing down the extent of the knee injury - described as a ‘slight knock’ - the forward stayed behind at the team hotel while the rest of the squad boarded the bus for the short journey to their training facility at Zelenogorsk. Rashford sustained the injury during England’s final training session at St George’s Park on Monday before heading to Russia. The 20 year-old did not train on Wednesday and was working in the gym on his own on Thursday while the squad were put through their paces. It means Rashford has only two days to prove his fitness before England fly to Volgograd on Sunday to prepare for the Tunisia match. The forward was not expected to start the match, with Raheem Sterling due to be selected ahead of him, but was impressive in England’s final warm-up game against Costa Rica and had been pushing for a place. England’s training involved a warm-up exercise with the players playing a version of American Football using a Vortex football - a kind of American Football-shaped ball with a tail that makes a whistling noise when thrown like a quarter-back. The tail acts as a hand-grip and also allows the ball to be thrown further and the players split into teams and were not allowed to run with it, having to pass the ball and then move. England get creative in training Credit: getty images Before they started training England held a minute’s silence to mark the first anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire, in which 72 people lost their lives, a disaster that has been supported by the FA and players, in particular Raheem Sterling who, of course, started his career at Queen’s Park Rangers. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Marcus Rashford a doubt for England's opening World Cup clash against Tunisia as he misses training again
Marcus Rashford missed England training for a second successive day and is now a doubt for Monday’s opening World Cup Group G fixture against Tunisia. Although both Rashford and the Football Association are playing down the extent of the knee injury - described as a ‘slight knock’ - the forward stayed behind at the team hotel while the rest of the squad boarded the bus for the short journey to their training facility at Zelenogorsk. Rashford sustained the injury during England’s final training session at St George’s Park on Monday before heading to Russia. The 20 year-old did not train on Wednesday and was working in the gym on his own on Thursday while the squad were put through their paces. It means Rashford has only two days to prove his fitness before England fly to Volgograd on Sunday to prepare for the Tunisia match. The forward was not expected to start the match, with Raheem Sterling due to be selected ahead of him, but was impressive in England’s final warm-up game against Costa Rica and had been pushing for a place. England’s training involved a warm-up exercise with the players playing a version of American Football using a Vortex football - a kind of American Football-shaped ball with a tail that makes a whistling noise when thrown like a quarter-back. The tail acts as a hand-grip and also allows the ball to be thrown further and the players split into teams and were not allowed to run with it, having to pass the ball and then move. England get creative in training Credit: getty images Before they started training England held a minute’s silence to mark the first anniversary of the Grenfell Tower fire, in which 72 people lost their lives, a disaster that has been supported by the FA and players, in particular Raheem Sterling who, of course, started his career at Queen’s Park Rangers. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Uruguay came second in the CONMEBOL (South American Football Confederation) table in the World Cup Qualifying play-offs.
FIFA World Cup 2018 Official squad: Group A – Team 4 – Uruguay
Uruguay came second in the CONMEBOL (South American Football Confederation) table in the World Cup Qualifying play-offs.
Uruguay came second in the CONMEBOL (South American Football Confederation) table in the World Cup Qualifying play-offs.
FIFA World Cup 2018 Official squad: Group A – Team 4 – Uruguay
Uruguay came second in the CONMEBOL (South American Football Confederation) table in the World Cup Qualifying play-offs.
Well, now we may know the reason why Phil Savage exited his job as the the director of Senior Bowl. The Alliance of American Football has announced that Savage will become the General Manager of the team that will be headquartered in Phoenix. “Phil’s experience as an NFL coach, scout, player personnel executive and general [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/13/phil-savage-becomes-g-m-of-phoenix-aaf-franchise/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
Phil Savage becomes G.M. of Phoenix AAF franchise
Well, now we may know the reason why Phil Savage exited his job as the the director of Senior Bowl. The Alliance of American Football has announced that Savage will become the General Manager of the team that will be headquartered in Phoenix. “Phil’s experience as an NFL coach, scout, player personnel executive and general [more]
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
We Need to Talk: James Harrison talks retirement
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
We Need to Talk: James Harrison talks retirement
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
We Need to Talk: James Harrison talks retirement
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
We Need to Talk: James Harrison talks retirement
Former American football linebacker James Harrison joins CBS Sports Analysts to discuss his retirement and comments on the New England Patriots.
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
Un-American Football: Your Guide to Enjoying This Yankee-Free World Cup
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
Un-American Football: Your Guide to Enjoying This Yankee-Free World Cup
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
Un-American Football: Your Guide to Enjoying This Yankee-Free World Cup
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
Un-American Football: Your Guide to Enjoying This Yankee-Free World Cup
The least red-white-and-blue (if you don’t count Russia!) major sporting event in our time will be the most chaotic, entertaining, and day-drinking-est World Cup the...world has ever known.
<p>Erstklassiger American-Football-Spieler: Wenn man Odell Beckham Jr. heißt, darf man es bunt treiben und sichert sich so auch ein elitäres Plätzchen im “The Super Rich Club”. (Bild: Instagram/superrichclub) </p>
Football-Star treibt es bunt

Erstklassiger American-Football-Spieler: Wenn man Odell Beckham Jr. heißt, darf man es bunt treiben und sichert sich so auch ein elitäres Plätzchen im “The Super Rich Club”. (Bild: Instagram/superrichclub)

The other city that lost an NFL team to L.A. could be getting a team in a new league. Via the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, both the Alliance of American Football and the XFL have contacted the Rams’ former home “to explore availability and interest.” Per the report, a third, yet-unnamed league has approached St. Louis. [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/07/aaf-xfl-explore-putting-team-in-st-louis/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
AAF, XFL explore putting team in St. Louis
The other city that lost an NFL team to L.A. could be getting a team in a new league. Via the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, both the Alliance of American Football and the XFL have contacted the Rams’ former home “to explore availability and interest.” Per the report, a third, yet-unnamed league has approached St. Louis. [more]
There are plenty of unanswered questions about how the two new spring football leagues will operate. Alliance of American Football co-founder Charlie Ebersol made his league’s position crystal clear as to one of those questions during a visit to the #PFTPM podcast on Wednesday. The new league will not accept players straight out of high [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/06/aaf-wont-be-accepting-players-right-out-of-high-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
AAF won’t be accepting players right out of high school
There are plenty of unanswered questions about how the two new spring football leagues will operate. Alliance of American Football co-founder Charlie Ebersol made his league’s position crystal clear as to one of those questions during a visit to the #PFTPM podcast on Wednesday. The new league will not accept players straight out of high [more]
There are plenty of unanswered questions about how the two new spring football leagues will operate. Alliance of American Football co-founder Charlie Ebersol made his league’s position crystal clear as to one of those questions during a visit to the #PFTPM podcast on Wednesday. The new league will not accept players straight out of high [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/06/aaf-wont-be-accepting-players-right-out-of-high-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
AAF won’t be accepting players right out of high school
There are plenty of unanswered questions about how the two new spring football leagues will operate. Alliance of American Football co-founder Charlie Ebersol made his league’s position crystal clear as to one of those questions during a visit to the #PFTPM podcast on Wednesday. The new league will not accept players straight out of high [more]
Jan 11, 2016; Glendale, AZ, USA; Clemson Tigers running back Wayne Gallman (9) is tackled by Alabama Crimson Tide linebacker Reuben Foster (10) in the second quarter in the 2016 CFP National Championship at University of Phoenix Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports / Reuters Picture Supplied by Action Images (TAGS: Sport American Football NCAA) *** Local Caption *** 2016-01-12T032122Z_714498906_NOCID_RTRMADP_3_NCAA-FOOTBALL-CFP-NATIONAL-CHAMPIONSHIP-ALABAMA-VS-CLEMSON.JPG
NCAA Football: CFP National Championship-Alabama vs Clemson
Jan 11, 2016; Glendale, AZ, USA; Clemson Tigers running back Wayne Gallman (9) is tackled by Alabama Crimson Tide linebacker Reuben Foster (10) in the second quarter in the 2016 CFP National Championship at University of Phoenix Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports / Reuters Picture Supplied by Action Images (TAGS: Sport American Football NCAA) *** Local Caption *** 2016-01-12T032122Z_714498906_NOCID_RTRMADP_3_NCAA-FOOTBALL-CFP-NATIONAL-CHAMPIONSHIP-ALABAMA-VS-CLEMSON.JPG
Jan 11, 2016; Glendale, AZ, USA; Clemson Tigers running back Wayne Gallman (9) is tackled by Alabama Crimson Tide linebacker Reuben Foster (10) in the second quarter in the 2016 CFP National Championship at University of Phoenix Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports / Reuters Picture Supplied by Action Images (TAGS: Sport American Football NCAA) *** Local Caption *** 2016-01-12T032122Z_714498906_NOCID_RTRMADP_3_NCAA-FOOTBALL-CFP-NATIONAL-CHAMPIONSHIP-ALABAMA-VS-CLEMSON.JPG
NCAA Football: CFP National Championship-Alabama vs Clemson
Jan 11, 2016; Glendale, AZ, USA; Clemson Tigers running back Wayne Gallman (9) is tackled by Alabama Crimson Tide linebacker Reuben Foster (10) in the second quarter in the 2016 CFP National Championship at University of Phoenix Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports / Reuters Picture Supplied by Action Images (TAGS: Sport American Football NCAA) *** Local Caption *** 2016-01-12T032122Z_714498906_NOCID_RTRMADP_3_NCAA-FOOTBALL-CFP-NATIONAL-CHAMPIONSHIP-ALABAMA-VS-CLEMSON.JPG
Alliance of American Football co-founder on what new league has to offer
Alliance of American Football co-founder on what new league has to offer
Alliance of American Football co-founder on what new league has to offer
The upstart Alliance of American Football is continuing to assemble coaching staffs as it builds toward an inaugural season that will start in eight months. Tim Lewis, a former Packers player and longtime NFL defensive coach, has been hired as the head coach of Birmingham’s team, according to AL.com. Lewis is the first AAF head [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/06/tim-lewis-to-coach-birminghams-aaf-team/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
Tim Lewis to coach Birmingham’s AAF team
The upstart Alliance of American Football is continuing to assemble coaching staffs as it builds toward an inaugural season that will start in eight months. Tim Lewis, a former Packers player and longtime NFL defensive coach, has been hired as the head coach of Birmingham’s team, according to AL.com. Lewis is the first AAF head [more]
The upstart Alliance of American Football is continuing to assemble coaching staffs as it builds toward an inaugural season that will start in eight months. Tim Lewis, a former Packers player and longtime NFL defensive coach, has been hired as the head coach of Birmingham’s team, according to AL.com. Lewis is the first AAF head [<a href="https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/06/tim-lewis-to-coach-birminghams-aaf-team/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">more</a>]
Tim Lewis to coach Birmingham’s AAF team
The upstart Alliance of American Football is continuing to assemble coaching staffs as it builds toward an inaugural season that will start in eight months. Tim Lewis, a former Packers player and longtime NFL defensive coach, has been hired as the head coach of Birmingham’s team, according to AL.com. Lewis is the first AAF head [more]
South American football powerhouse Argentina have cancelled their international friendly game against Israel. The Lionel Messi-led Argentina were supposed to play against Israel on Saturday in Jerusalem at the Teddy Kollek Stadium. The political pressure and protests led to Argentina taking this decision. Earlier, the Palestine Football Association chief had urged fans to burn pictures of Lionel Messi if he plays against Israel.
Argentina will not play against Israel in Jerusalem, here's why
South American football powerhouse Argentina have cancelled their international friendly game against Israel. The Lionel Messi-led Argentina were supposed to play against Israel on Saturday in Jerusalem at the Teddy Kollek Stadium. The political pressure and protests led to Argentina taking this decision. Earlier, the Palestine Football Association chief had urged fans to burn pictures of Lionel Messi if he plays against Israel.
<p><strong>Salary/winnings: $57.5 </strong><br><strong>Endorsements: $2 million</strong><br><strong>Country: USA</strong> </p>
#10. Matthew Stafford (American Football) – Total earnings: $59.5 million

Salary/winnings: $57.5
Endorsements: $2 million
Country: USA

<p><strong>Salary/winnings: $62.3 million</strong><br><strong>Endorsements: $5 million</strong><br><strong>Country: USA</strong> </p>
#9. Matt Ryan (American Football) – Total earnings: $67.3 million

Salary/winnings: $62.3 million
Endorsements: $5 million
Country: USA

Brain injury experts have warned football to urgently overhaul their medical protocols after the “alarming” and “extraordinary” chain of events following Liverpool goalkeeper Loris Karius’s Champions League final concussion. The charities Headway and The Jeff Astle Foundation, as well as Taylor Twellman, whose own career was ended by a head injury, told Telegraph Sport that the final decision on whether players stay on the pitch following a suspected concussion should no longer rest with club doctors but an independent medical professional. Headway, Twellman and Dr Willie Stewart, the neuropathologist who diagnosed Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in former England striker Jeff Astle, also all called for football to follow rugby union in introducing temporary substitutions to allow players to leave the pitch for in-depth assessments. They also want the more proactive use of video technology during games, as is the case in American football, to assist doctors, coaches and officials in identifying incidents. Headway chief executive Peter McCabe questioned the “worrying” circumstances around how Karius completed the Champions League, where his mistakes helped Real Madrid to a 3-1 win, despite taking an elbow to the head and then being diagnosed five days later by doctors in Boston with concussion. “The best time to diagnose a discussion is when it happens,” said McCabe. “He should have been assessed on the pitch. If that didn't happen, when he came off. If that didn't happen, when he got back to Liverpool, where they have got an excellent neurological centre - the Walton Centre. To leave it that long is extraordinary, it seems to me.” Karius is caught by Ramos' elbow Credit: BT Sport Karius was assessed by Liverpool’s medical team after the match but, although the goalkeeper had signalled to the referee that he had been struck by Sergio Ramos’s elbow, there was no on-field call for treatment and the incident was only widely picked up following replays. Liverpool have not commented on the precise chronology of Karios’ treatment but, upon learning that he was going to America for a holiday, there was sufficient concern to recommend tests with experts at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Those tests took place on May 31 and, in conjunction with Karius, the concussion diagnosis was released on Monday. Dr Stewart, who is leading new research into the incidence of neurological disease in football, sympathised with the immediate difficulty of spotting a problem but was damning in his assessment of the wider concussion guidelines. "It's only with the benefit of hindsight you go back and say maybe that slight blow could have been a significant injury,” said Dr Stewart. “But football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management. In its immediate pitch-side management and the way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. "Football doesn't allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn't allow significant time for the medics to assess the player; doesn't have a video review of events to be able say if there was a glancing blow on my goalkeeper's head which I didn't notice. It's unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way." Concussion Q&A | by Luke Edwards McCabe and Twellman believe that the potential severity of the Karius situation could have been grasped with better procedures. “In the biggest game in club football, it is alarming to hear that a player has played nearly half a match with a potential concussion,” said McCabe. “It strikes me as hard to believe nobody spotted it at the time, when he was showing the referee he had been elbowed. What were the assistant referees’ behind the goal doing?” Twellman said that it underlined the urgent need for video technology to help medics during games. “If you had an independent doctor with access to all those cameras you can make a more educated decision,” said Twellman. “The reality is he got hit in the head. It’s fact. Sergio Ramos should have been red-carded and Karius should have come off the field.” Main lesson of Loris Karius' nightmare in Kiev is that football has to wake up to head injuries Ramos, with whom Mohamed Salah also tangled before being forced off with a shoulder injury, remained unrepentant on Tuesday. "I am only missing Roberto Firmino saying he got a cold because a drop of my sweat landed on him," said Ramos. "Bloody hell, they have given this Salah thing a lot of attention. He could have played if he got an injection for the second half. After that the goalkeeper says I dazed him.” Uefa are currently reviewing their concussion protocols and, after a rule change by the International Football Association Board, are planning to allow video footage in technical areas. The Premier League and the Football Association introduced a new ‘If In Doubt, Sit Them Out’ concussion protocol in 2015. There is an additional independent touchline doctor to assist club medics at every game but final decisions rest with club staff. Video technology is frequently used but not mandatory. Ramos mocked Liverpool fans who blamed him for two of their players' injuries Credit: AFP In American Football, there is an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant on each sideline during a game to assist in diagnosing concussion injuries, as well as a certified athletic trainer studying video monitors from the press box. Twellman, whose own career in Major League Soccer was ended at the age of 28, described football’s various protocols as “eye-candy”. He said: “They don’t truly care. It says it all that, after the World Cup final in 2014, when Cristoph Kramer did not know where he was but played on for 14 minutes, we are no further on. The governing bodies don’t take it seriously enough.” Headway want to work with football to improve guidelines. “The independent doctor makes perfect sense,” said McCabe. “Concussion substitutes would also be an entirely sensible way forward. You could bring a player in and the team would not be disadvantaged while they made the assessment. It is common sense.”
Loris Karius' 'alarming' concussion saga sparks urgent warnings from brain experts for football to change protocol
Brain injury experts have warned football to urgently overhaul their medical protocols after the “alarming” and “extraordinary” chain of events following Liverpool goalkeeper Loris Karius’s Champions League final concussion. The charities Headway and The Jeff Astle Foundation, as well as Taylor Twellman, whose own career was ended by a head injury, told Telegraph Sport that the final decision on whether players stay on the pitch following a suspected concussion should no longer rest with club doctors but an independent medical professional. Headway, Twellman and Dr Willie Stewart, the neuropathologist who diagnosed Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in former England striker Jeff Astle, also all called for football to follow rugby union in introducing temporary substitutions to allow players to leave the pitch for in-depth assessments. They also want the more proactive use of video technology during games, as is the case in American football, to assist doctors, coaches and officials in identifying incidents. Headway chief executive Peter McCabe questioned the “worrying” circumstances around how Karius completed the Champions League, where his mistakes helped Real Madrid to a 3-1 win, despite taking an elbow to the head and then being diagnosed five days later by doctors in Boston with concussion. “The best time to diagnose a discussion is when it happens,” said McCabe. “He should have been assessed on the pitch. If that didn't happen, when he came off. If that didn't happen, when he got back to Liverpool, where they have got an excellent neurological centre - the Walton Centre. To leave it that long is extraordinary, it seems to me.” Karius is caught by Ramos' elbow Credit: BT Sport Karius was assessed by Liverpool’s medical team after the match but, although the goalkeeper had signalled to the referee that he had been struck by Sergio Ramos’s elbow, there was no on-field call for treatment and the incident was only widely picked up following replays. Liverpool have not commented on the precise chronology of Karios’ treatment but, upon learning that he was going to America for a holiday, there was sufficient concern to recommend tests with experts at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Those tests took place on May 31 and, in conjunction with Karius, the concussion diagnosis was released on Monday. Dr Stewart, who is leading new research into the incidence of neurological disease in football, sympathised with the immediate difficulty of spotting a problem but was damning in his assessment of the wider concussion guidelines. "It's only with the benefit of hindsight you go back and say maybe that slight blow could have been a significant injury,” said Dr Stewart. “But football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management. In its immediate pitch-side management and the way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. "Football doesn't allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn't allow significant time for the medics to assess the player; doesn't have a video review of events to be able say if there was a glancing blow on my goalkeeper's head which I didn't notice. It's unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way." Concussion Q&A | by Luke Edwards McCabe and Twellman believe that the potential severity of the Karius situation could have been grasped with better procedures. “In the biggest game in club football, it is alarming to hear that a player has played nearly half a match with a potential concussion,” said McCabe. “It strikes me as hard to believe nobody spotted it at the time, when he was showing the referee he had been elbowed. What were the assistant referees’ behind the goal doing?” Twellman said that it underlined the urgent need for video technology to help medics during games. “If you had an independent doctor with access to all those cameras you can make a more educated decision,” said Twellman. “The reality is he got hit in the head. It’s fact. Sergio Ramos should have been red-carded and Karius should have come off the field.” Main lesson of Loris Karius' nightmare in Kiev is that football has to wake up to head injuries Ramos, with whom Mohamed Salah also tangled before being forced off with a shoulder injury, remained unrepentant on Tuesday. "I am only missing Roberto Firmino saying he got a cold because a drop of my sweat landed on him," said Ramos. "Bloody hell, they have given this Salah thing a lot of attention. He could have played if he got an injection for the second half. After that the goalkeeper says I dazed him.” Uefa are currently reviewing their concussion protocols and, after a rule change by the International Football Association Board, are planning to allow video footage in technical areas. The Premier League and the Football Association introduced a new ‘If In Doubt, Sit Them Out’ concussion protocol in 2015. There is an additional independent touchline doctor to assist club medics at every game but final decisions rest with club staff. Video technology is frequently used but not mandatory. Ramos mocked Liverpool fans who blamed him for two of their players' injuries Credit: AFP In American Football, there is an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant on each sideline during a game to assist in diagnosing concussion injuries, as well as a certified athletic trainer studying video monitors from the press box. Twellman, whose own career in Major League Soccer was ended at the age of 28, described football’s various protocols as “eye-candy”. He said: “They don’t truly care. It says it all that, after the World Cup final in 2014, when Cristoph Kramer did not know where he was but played on for 14 minutes, we are no further on. The governing bodies don’t take it seriously enough.” Headway want to work with football to improve guidelines. “The independent doctor makes perfect sense,” said McCabe. “Concussion substitutes would also be an entirely sensible way forward. You could bring a player in and the team would not be disadvantaged while they made the assessment. It is common sense.”
Brain injury experts have warned football to urgently overhaul their medical protocols after the “alarming” and “extraordinary” chain of events following Liverpool goalkeeper Loris Karius’s Champions League final concussion. The charities Headway and The Jeff Astle Foundation, as well as Taylor Twellman, whose own career was ended by a head injury, told Telegraph Sport that the final decision on whether players stay on the pitch following a suspected concussion should no longer rest with club doctors but an independent medical professional. Headway, Twellman and Dr Willie Stewart, the neuropathologist who diagnosed Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in former England striker Jeff Astle, also all called for football to follow rugby union in introducing temporary substitutions to allow players to leave the pitch for in-depth assessments. They also want the more proactive use of video technology during games, as is the case in American football, to assist doctors, coaches and officials in identifying incidents. Headway chief executive Peter McCabe questioned the “worrying” circumstances around how Karius completed the Champions League, where his mistakes helped Real Madrid to a 3-1 win, despite taking an elbow to the head and then being diagnosed five days later by doctors in Boston with concussion. “The best time to diagnose a discussion is when it happens,” said McCabe. “He should have been assessed on the pitch. If that didn't happen, when he came off. If that didn't happen, when he got back to Liverpool, where they have got an excellent neurological centre - the Walton Centre. To leave it that long is extraordinary, it seems to me.” Karius is caught by Ramos' elbow Credit: BT Sport Karius was assessed by Liverpool’s medical team after the match but, although the goalkeeper had signalled to the referee that he had been struck by Sergio Ramos’s elbow, there was no on-field call for treatment and the incident was only widely picked up following replays. Liverpool have not commented on the precise chronology of Karios’ treatment but, upon learning that he was going to America for a holiday, there was sufficient concern to recommend tests with experts at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Those tests took place on May 31 and, in conjunction with Karius, the concussion diagnosis was released on Monday. Dr Stewart, who is leading new research into the incidence of neurological disease in football, sympathised with the immediate difficulty of spotting a problem but was damning in his assessment of the wider concussion guidelines. "It's only with the benefit of hindsight you go back and say maybe that slight blow could have been a significant injury,” said Dr Stewart. “But football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management. In its immediate pitch-side management and the way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. "Football doesn't allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn't allow significant time for the medics to assess the player; doesn't have a video review of events to be able say if there was a glancing blow on my goalkeeper's head which I didn't notice. It's unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way." Concussion Q&A | by Luke Edwards McCabe and Twellman believe that the potential severity of the Karius situation could have been grasped with better procedures. “In the biggest game in club football, it is alarming to hear that a player has played nearly half a match with a potential concussion,” said McCabe. “It strikes me as hard to believe nobody spotted it at the time, when he was showing the referee he had been elbowed. What were the assistant referees’ behind the goal doing?” Twellman said that it underlined the urgent need for video technology to help medics during games. “If you had an independent doctor with access to all those cameras you can make a more educated decision,” said Twellman. “The reality is he got hit in the head. It’s fact. Sergio Ramos should have been red-carded and Karius should have come off the field.” Main lesson of Loris Karius' nightmare in Kiev is that football has to wake up to head injuries Ramos, with whom Mohamed Salah also tangled before being forced off with a shoulder injury, remained unrepentant on Tuesday. "I am only missing Roberto Firmino saying he got a cold because a drop of my sweat landed on him," said Ramos. "Bloody hell, they have given this Salah thing a lot of attention. He could have played if he got an injection for the second half. After that the goalkeeper says I dazed him.” Uefa are currently reviewing their concussion protocols and, after a rule change by the International Football Association Board, are planning to allow video footage in technical areas. The Premier League and the Football Association introduced a new ‘If In Doubt, Sit Them Out’ concussion protocol in 2015. There is an additional independent touchline doctor to assist club medics at every game but final decisions rest with club staff. Video technology is frequently used but not mandatory. Ramos mocked Liverpool fans who blamed him for two of their players' injuries Credit: AFP In American Football, there is an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant on each sideline during a game to assist in diagnosing concussion injuries, as well as a certified athletic trainer studying video monitors from the press box. Twellman, whose own career in Major League Soccer was ended at the age of 28, described football’s various protocols as “eye-candy”. He said: “They don’t truly care. It says it all that, after the World Cup final in 2014, when Cristoph Kramer did not know where he was but played on for 14 minutes, we are no further on. The governing bodies don’t take it seriously enough.” Headway want to work with football to improve guidelines. “The independent doctor makes perfect sense,” said McCabe. “Concussion substitutes would also be an entirely sensible way forward. You could bring a player in and the team would not be disadvantaged while they made the assessment. It is common sense.”
Loris Karius' 'alarming' concussion saga sparks urgent warnings from brain experts for football to change protocol
Brain injury experts have warned football to urgently overhaul their medical protocols after the “alarming” and “extraordinary” chain of events following Liverpool goalkeeper Loris Karius’s Champions League final concussion. The charities Headway and The Jeff Astle Foundation, as well as Taylor Twellman, whose own career was ended by a head injury, told Telegraph Sport that the final decision on whether players stay on the pitch following a suspected concussion should no longer rest with club doctors but an independent medical professional. Headway, Twellman and Dr Willie Stewart, the neuropathologist who diagnosed Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in former England striker Jeff Astle, also all called for football to follow rugby union in introducing temporary substitutions to allow players to leave the pitch for in-depth assessments. They also want the more proactive use of video technology during games, as is the case in American football, to assist doctors, coaches and officials in identifying incidents. Headway chief executive Peter McCabe questioned the “worrying” circumstances around how Karius completed the Champions League, where his mistakes helped Real Madrid to a 3-1 win, despite taking an elbow to the head and then being diagnosed five days later by doctors in Boston with concussion. “The best time to diagnose a discussion is when it happens,” said McCabe. “He should have been assessed on the pitch. If that didn't happen, when he came off. If that didn't happen, when he got back to Liverpool, where they have got an excellent neurological centre - the Walton Centre. To leave it that long is extraordinary, it seems to me.” Karius is caught by Ramos' elbow Credit: BT Sport Karius was assessed by Liverpool’s medical team after the match but, although the goalkeeper had signalled to the referee that he had been struck by Sergio Ramos’s elbow, there was no on-field call for treatment and the incident was only widely picked up following replays. Liverpool have not commented on the precise chronology of Karios’ treatment but, upon learning that he was going to America for a holiday, there was sufficient concern to recommend tests with experts at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Those tests took place on May 31 and, in conjunction with Karius, the concussion diagnosis was released on Monday. Dr Stewart, who is leading new research into the incidence of neurological disease in football, sympathised with the immediate difficulty of spotting a problem but was damning in his assessment of the wider concussion guidelines. "It's only with the benefit of hindsight you go back and say maybe that slight blow could have been a significant injury,” said Dr Stewart. “But football is operating in the last century in terms of brain injury management. In its immediate pitch-side management and the way the medics are left to deal with this, they are handcuffed. "Football doesn't allow an interchange for a player to be assessed to see if he has a brain injury; doesn't allow significant time for the medics to assess the player; doesn't have a video review of events to be able say if there was a glancing blow on my goalkeeper's head which I didn't notice. It's unacceptable in 2018 that it should be this way." Concussion Q&A | by Luke Edwards McCabe and Twellman believe that the potential severity of the Karius situation could have been grasped with better procedures. “In the biggest game in club football, it is alarming to hear that a player has played nearly half a match with a potential concussion,” said McCabe. “It strikes me as hard to believe nobody spotted it at the time, when he was showing the referee he had been elbowed. What were the assistant referees’ behind the goal doing?” Twellman said that it underlined the urgent need for video technology to help medics during games. “If you had an independent doctor with access to all those cameras you can make a more educated decision,” said Twellman. “The reality is he got hit in the head. It’s fact. Sergio Ramos should have been red-carded and Karius should have come off the field.” Main lesson of Loris Karius' nightmare in Kiev is that football has to wake up to head injuries Ramos, with whom Mohamed Salah also tangled before being forced off with a shoulder injury, remained unrepentant on Tuesday. "I am only missing Roberto Firmino saying he got a cold because a drop of my sweat landed on him," said Ramos. "Bloody hell, they have given this Salah thing a lot of attention. He could have played if he got an injection for the second half. After that the goalkeeper says I dazed him.” Uefa are currently reviewing their concussion protocols and, after a rule change by the International Football Association Board, are planning to allow video footage in technical areas. The Premier League and the Football Association introduced a new ‘If In Doubt, Sit Them Out’ concussion protocol in 2015. There is an additional independent touchline doctor to assist club medics at every game but final decisions rest with club staff. Video technology is frequently used but not mandatory. Ramos mocked Liverpool fans who blamed him for two of their players' injuries Credit: AFP In American Football, there is an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant on each sideline during a game to assist in diagnosing concussion injuries, as well as a certified athletic trainer studying video monitors from the press box. Twellman, whose own career in Major League Soccer was ended at the age of 28, described football’s various protocols as “eye-candy”. He said: “They don’t truly care. It says it all that, after the World Cup final in 2014, when Cristoph Kramer did not know where he was but played on for 14 minutes, we are no further on. The governing bodies don’t take it seriously enough.” Headway want to work with football to improve guidelines. “The independent doctor makes perfect sense,” said McCabe. “Concussion substitutes would also be an entirely sensible way forward. You could bring a player in and the team would not be disadvantaged while they made the assessment. It is common sense.”
The mayor of Philadelphia has described Donald Trump as “a fragile egomaniac” after the president rescinded a White House invitation to the city’s Super Bowl-winning team, as punishment for players protesting against his policies. The Philadelphia Eagles were due on Tuesday to celebrate their first Super Bowl victory with the traditional presidential party. But on the eve of the event, the White House issued a statement saying the visit had been called off because many of the players said they would boycott the event. The White House said on Tuesday that they had initially been told 81 people were going to attend, but on Monday, they were informed that the final confirmed number of attendees was fewer than 10 – including players, coaches and trainers. None of the players knelt last season during the national anthem – a personal bugbear of the president – but the Eagles has been one of the most outspoken teams against Mr Trump’s policies, especially safety Malcolm Jenkins, who was not planning on attending the ceremony. He raised a fist during the national anthem last year, but agreed to stop when the NFL agreed to donate $100 million to charities and causes important to African-American communities. "There is so much that has been swirling around that administration," he said. "I don't see it as beneficial at this moment in time to visit in a celebratory fashion." Philadelphia Eagles players before the Super Bowl on February 4 Mr Trump, aware of how the celebration would look, cancelled the party but went ahead with a "celebration" without the players, describing it as being "even bigger than we anticipated". "We love our country, we love our flag and we will always stand for the national anthem," said Mr Trump, welcoming fans to the White House for a "great patriotic celebration". He continued: "We stand to honour our military, and honour our country, and remember those who never made it back home," he said. "America is a great nation, a community, a family, our home - and America has never done better than it is now; record numbers." He then reeled off employment statistics and business rates. "We stand together for freedom, we stand together for patriotism, and our glorious nation under God." Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, on Tuesday accused the Eagles of orchestrating "a political stunt" and informing the White House of their much-reduced delegation "at the eleventh hour" to embarrass the president. The White House statement read: "They disagree with their President because he insists that they proudly stand for the National Anthem, hand on heart, in honor of the great men and women of our military and the people of our country. "The Eagles wanted to send a smaller delegation, but the 1,000 fans planning to attend the event deserve better. "These fans are still invited to the White House to be part of a different type of ceremony - one that will honor our great country, pay tribute to the heroes who fight to protect it, and loudly and proudly play the National Anthem." The team have not commented on the unprecedented snub, only issuing a bland statement thanking the fans for their support. “It has been incredibly thrilling to celebrate our first Super Bowl championship,” the club said. “We are truly grateful for the support we have received.” But Torrey Smith, who has previously criticised the president as sexist and racist, said disinviting his team mates was “cowardly”. Celebrations after the Philadelphia Eagles beat the New England Patriots in February He said no one was refusing to go simply because Mr Trump insisted they stand for the national anthem. “There are a lot of people on the team that have plenty of different views,” he said. “The men and women that wanted to go should’ve been able to go. It’s a cowardly act to cancel the celebration because the majority of the people don’t want to see you. To make it about the anthem is foolish.” But the mayor of Philadelphia, Jim Kenney, lashed out at the president for withholding the honour, saying he was “proud of the Eagles' activism off the field.” Carson Wentz, the quarterback, spent the day tweeting about his Christian food trucks, The Kingdom Crumb, delivering free meals to the city’s homeless. “These are players who stand up for the causes they believe in and who contribute in meaningful ways to their community,” said Mr Kenney. “They represent the diversity of our nation - a nation in which we are free to express our opinions. “Disinviting them from the White House only proves that our President is not a true patriot, but a fragile egomaniac obsessed with crowd size and afraid of the embarrassment of throwing a party to which no one wants to attend.” Mr Trump has repeatedly lashed out at players who kneel for the national anthem, in protest at police treatment of African American communities, and had described them as unpatriotic. Last week the body that governs American football, the NFL, bowed to Mr Trump's views and issued new rules to fine teams if their players knelt during the national anthem. The players' union reacted with anger, and the Philadelphia Eagles took a vote to decide whether to attend the White House ceremony. They voted, however, to go ahead with the visit. Mr Trump said he would be there at 3pm "with the United States Marine Band and the United States Army Chorus to celebrate America." He later tweeted: "Staying in the Locker Room for the playing of our National Anthem is as disrespectful to our country as kneeling. Sorry!" The Philadelphia Eagles Football Team was invited to the White House. Unfortunately, only a small number of players decided to come, and we canceled the event. Staying in the Locker Room for the playing of our National Anthem is as disrespectful to our country as kneeling. Sorry!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 5, 2018 There are a lot of people on the team that have plenty of different views. The men and women that wanted to go should’ve been able to go. It’s a cowardly act to cancel the celebration because the majority of the people don’t want to see you. To make it about the anthem is foolish— Torrey Smith (@TorreySmithWR) June 4, 2018 The visit was controversial from the start, with many players saying well in advance that they would not attend. Jenkins said in February he did not want to go. "When it comes to this presidency, I'm not very excited about getting my picture taken with him," Jenkins said. "This is a celebratory event where we come, the President comes in, shakes a couple hands, takes a picture and leaves. And I'm just not interested in that. San Francisco 49ers outside linebacker Eli Harold, quarterback Colin Kaepernick and safety Eric Reid kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game in October 2016, at the start of the protests against police brutality "It's just not worth my time. I'd rather spend my time working with whoever on these issues that we've been fighting for. That's just my personal decision." He said some of his team mates disagreed, however. "Some guys have dreamed about winning a championship and taking that trip to the White House and we're not going to deny that to anybody. "But there are also a lot of guys who are passionate about not going." Chris Long won the Super Bowl in 2017 with the New England Patriots and boycotted the White House visit, and said he planned to do the same this year. "My son grows up, and I believe the legacy of our president is going to be what it is," he said in January. Pink sings the national anthem before the Super Bowl, in February "I don't want him to say, 'Hey dad, why'd you go (to the White House) when you knew the right thing was to not go?'" But Doug Pederson, the head coach, said he was excited to go to the White House. "We are excited to be going and be honoured as world champions," he said last week. "It’s a great honour. We are still working on logistics, but we are excited to be going."
Super Bowl-winning Philadelphia Eagles' White House visit called off amid national anthem row
The mayor of Philadelphia has described Donald Trump as “a fragile egomaniac” after the president rescinded a White House invitation to the city’s Super Bowl-winning team, as punishment for players protesting against his policies. The Philadelphia Eagles were due on Tuesday to celebrate their first Super Bowl victory with the traditional presidential party. But on the eve of the event, the White House issued a statement saying the visit had been called off because many of the players said they would boycott the event. The White House said on Tuesday that they had initially been told 81 people were going to attend, but on Monday, they were informed that the final confirmed number of attendees was fewer than 10 – including players, coaches and trainers. None of the players knelt last season during the national anthem – a personal bugbear of the president – but the Eagles has been one of the most outspoken teams against Mr Trump’s policies, especially safety Malcolm Jenkins, who was not planning on attending the ceremony. He raised a fist during the national anthem last year, but agreed to stop when the NFL agreed to donate $100 million to charities and causes important to African-American communities. "There is so much that has been swirling around that administration," he said. "I don't see it as beneficial at this moment in time to visit in a celebratory fashion." Philadelphia Eagles players before the Super Bowl on February 4 Mr Trump, aware of how the celebration would look, cancelled the party but went ahead with a "celebration" without the players, describing it as being "even bigger than we anticipated". "We love our country, we love our flag and we will always stand for the national anthem," said Mr Trump, welcoming fans to the White House for a "great patriotic celebration". He continued: "We stand to honour our military, and honour our country, and remember those who never made it back home," he said. "America is a great nation, a community, a family, our home - and America has never done better than it is now; record numbers." He then reeled off employment statistics and business rates. "We stand together for freedom, we stand together for patriotism, and our glorious nation under God." Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, on Tuesday accused the Eagles of orchestrating "a political stunt" and informing the White House of their much-reduced delegation "at the eleventh hour" to embarrass the president. The White House statement read: "They disagree with their President because he insists that they proudly stand for the National Anthem, hand on heart, in honor of the great men and women of our military and the people of our country. "The Eagles wanted to send a smaller delegation, but the 1,000 fans planning to attend the event deserve better. "These fans are still invited to the White House to be part of a different type of ceremony - one that will honor our great country, pay tribute to the heroes who fight to protect it, and loudly and proudly play the National Anthem." The team have not commented on the unprecedented snub, only issuing a bland statement thanking the fans for their support. “It has been incredibly thrilling to celebrate our first Super Bowl championship,” the club said. “We are truly grateful for the support we have received.” But Torrey Smith, who has previously criticised the president as sexist and racist, said disinviting his team mates was “cowardly”. Celebrations after the Philadelphia Eagles beat the New England Patriots in February He said no one was refusing to go simply because Mr Trump insisted they stand for the national anthem. “There are a lot of people on the team that have plenty of different views,” he said. “The men and women that wanted to go should’ve been able to go. It’s a cowardly act to cancel the celebration because the majority of the people don’t want to see you. To make it about the anthem is foolish.” But the mayor of Philadelphia, Jim Kenney, lashed out at the president for withholding the honour, saying he was “proud of the Eagles' activism off the field.” Carson Wentz, the quarterback, spent the day tweeting about his Christian food trucks, The Kingdom Crumb, delivering free meals to the city’s homeless. “These are players who stand up for the causes they believe in and who contribute in meaningful ways to their community,” said Mr Kenney. “They represent the diversity of our nation - a nation in which we are free to express our opinions. “Disinviting them from the White House only proves that our President is not a true patriot, but a fragile egomaniac obsessed with crowd size and afraid of the embarrassment of throwing a party to which no one wants to attend.” Mr Trump has repeatedly lashed out at players who kneel for the national anthem, in protest at police treatment of African American communities, and had described them as unpatriotic. Last week the body that governs American football, the NFL, bowed to Mr Trump's views and issued new rules to fine teams if their players knelt during the national anthem. The players' union reacted with anger, and the Philadelphia Eagles took a vote to decide whether to attend the White House ceremony. They voted, however, to go ahead with the visit. Mr Trump said he would be there at 3pm "with the United States Marine Band and the United States Army Chorus to celebrate America." He later tweeted: "Staying in the Locker Room for the playing of our National Anthem is as disrespectful to our country as kneeling. Sorry!" The Philadelphia Eagles Football Team was invited to the White House. Unfortunately, only a small number of players decided to come, and we canceled the event. Staying in the Locker Room for the playing of our National Anthem is as disrespectful to our country as kneeling. Sorry!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 5, 2018 There are a lot of people on the team that have plenty of different views. The men and women that wanted to go should’ve been able to go. It’s a cowardly act to cancel the celebration because the majority of the people don’t want to see you. To make it about the anthem is foolish— Torrey Smith (@TorreySmithWR) June 4, 2018 The visit was controversial from the start, with many players saying well in advance that they would not attend. Jenkins said in February he did not want to go. "When it comes to this presidency, I'm not very excited about getting my picture taken with him," Jenkins said. "This is a celebratory event where we come, the President comes in, shakes a couple hands, takes a picture and leaves. And I'm just not interested in that. San Francisco 49ers outside linebacker Eli Harold, quarterback Colin Kaepernick and safety Eric Reid kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game in October 2016, at the start of the protests against police brutality "It's just not worth my time. I'd rather spend my time working with whoever on these issues that we've been fighting for. That's just my personal decision." He said some of his team mates disagreed, however. "Some guys have dreamed about winning a championship and taking that trip to the White House and we're not going to deny that to anybody. "But there are also a lot of guys who are passionate about not going." Chris Long won the Super Bowl in 2017 with the New England Patriots and boycotted the White House visit, and said he planned to do the same this year. "My son grows up, and I believe the legacy of our president is going to be what it is," he said in January. Pink sings the national anthem before the Super Bowl, in February "I don't want him to say, 'Hey dad, why'd you go (to the White House) when you knew the right thing was to not go?'" But Doug Pederson, the head coach, said he was excited to go to the White House. "We are excited to be going and be honoured as world champions," he said last week. "It’s a great honour. We are still working on logistics, but we are excited to be going."

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