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2018 Super Bowl LII: When is the 52nd NFL showpiece, what time does it start and who is the half-time performer?

What is it? Super Bowl 2018 is the grand final of the NFL season - American Football's showpiece event. This will be the 52nd edition and will be played between the Philadelphia Eagles and the New England Patriots in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings. When is it? Sunday, February 4. What time is kick-off? The kick-off time will be revealed at a later date. What TV channel is it on? The BBC, which means it's free-to-air, and Sky. It is expected to start around 6pm Eastern Time (11pm GMT). Who is performing in the halftime show? Justin Timberlake will headline Super Bowl LII. It will be his third time performing on the Super Bowl halftime stage, giving him the distinction of making the most appearances by an individual entertainer. He previously performed at Super Bowls XXXV (N'Sync) and XXXVIII (solo). The 10-time Grammy winner's last Super Bowl appearance came in 2004, when he infamously pulled part of Janet Jackson's costume off (a 'wardrobe malfunction),  revealing her breast on national television and causing a major controversy. Performing at the Super Bowl is one of the most coveted gigs in the business. Recent halftime acts including Lady Gaga, Coldplay, Beyoncé, Katy Perry, Bruno Mars, Madonna, The Who, Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Prince, the Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney and U2. It is always the most-watched music event of the year. In fact, last year's show was the most watched musical event of all time across all platforms and the most-watched Super Bowl halftime performance in history, reaching more than 150 million people. Pink will perform the American national anthem before the big game. Which teams are in the Super Bowl? Tom Brady is swamped by photographers after New England's win Credit: Reuters  The New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, will face the Philadelphia Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005 when they lost to the Pats.  The Eagles, the number one seeds going into the play-offs following a 13-3 season record, were crowned NFC champions following a 38-7 victory over the Minnesota Vikings. Nick Foles threw three touchdown passes to help lead his team to the Super Bowl just a few months after the Eagles lost start quarterback Carson Wentz to a serious knee injury.  London-born Jay Ajayi celebrates Philadelphia Eagles' NFC championship win  Credit: AP  Foles proved he can deliver in big games after some critics wrote off the Eagles's chances of winning the NFC title following Wentz's injury. The Vikings would have been the first team to play a Super Bowl in their home stadium. Tom Brady threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes earlier on Sunday evening as the New England Patriots made it three Super Bowl appearances in four year. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles.  Brady had been an injury doubt going into the game after requiring stitches on a hand gash picked up in training  earlier this week but starred to help lead his side to another Super Bowl.  The Patriots will equal Pittsburgh's record of six Super Bowl triumphs if they win on 4 February in Minneapolis. What are they saying? Eagles quarterback Nick Foles on reaching the Super Bowl  I haven’t even had time to really comprehend what is going on, to be honest. I don’t know if I ever will. When I was up on that stage, that’s something you dream about as a kid. In sports, everything’s a process, and you can’t give up. Everyone, when it’s a bad outing, wants to be really critical. But no one in the locker room doubted me. You just have to keep working. You’re not going to always have a great day. You should never get down. You should always learn from those experiences and look forward to working through them. Because that’s the beautiful thing, when you look back at the journey and you realise that it wasn’t always great. There were bumps in the road, but you were able to overcome them with the help of the people around you, the people that believe in you and love you. That’s a special thing, and that’s what’s so special about a moment like this, because you have an opportunity to reflect and be grateful.” Patriots quarterback Tom Brady It's pretty crazy. It's pretty amazing to be on a team that wins these kind of games. It's so great. We said whatever it takes. That was a great second half. I'm just so proud of our team. Amazing. I wasn't sure on Wednesday [whether I'd play]. I thought, out of all the plays, my season can't end on a handoff in practice. I didn't come this far to end on a handoff. It's just one of those things. So I came into the training room and wasn't quite sure what happened. But everyone did a great job of kind of getting me ready. The training staff and the doctors and Alex [Guerrero]. There was a great team effort. Without that, I definitely wouldn't be playing.  A report has claimed there is a rift between Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, coach Bill Belichick and owner Robert Kraft, but tight end Rob Gronkowski has insisted he and team-mates are not losing any sleep over it. The reputation that coach tries to get us to have is just ignore the noise. Ignore the noise from the outside and I feel like that's what myself, a lot of other players have been doing. You've just got to keep ignoring the noise and just keep our focus on what we've been doing all year and that's preparing hard, studying our opponent, getting ready mentally and physically for the big game." What are the odds? (to win the Super Bowl) New England Patriots 4/9 Philadelphia Eagles 2/1 What's our prediction? Tom Brady to go out in style with a sixth Super Bowl ring.  Predicted score:New England Patriots 26-20 Philadelphia Eagles

2018 Super Bowl LII: When is the 52nd NFL showpiece, what time does it start and who is the half-time performer?

What is it? Super Bowl 2018 is the grand final of the NFL season - American Football's showpiece event. This will be the 52nd edition and will be played between the Philadelphia Eagles and the New England Patriots in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings. When is it? Sunday, February 4. What time is kick-off? The kick-off time will be revealed at a later date. What TV channel is it on? The BBC, which means it's free-to-air, and Sky. It is expected to start around 6pm Eastern Time (11pm GMT). Who is performing in the halftime show? Justin Timberlake will headline Super Bowl LII. It will be his third time performing on the Super Bowl halftime stage, giving him the distinction of making the most appearances by an individual entertainer. He previously performed at Super Bowls XXXV (N'Sync) and XXXVIII (solo). The 10-time Grammy winner's last Super Bowl appearance came in 2004, when he infamously pulled part of Janet Jackson's costume off (a 'wardrobe malfunction),  revealing her breast on national television and causing a major controversy. Performing at the Super Bowl is one of the most coveted gigs in the business. Recent halftime acts including Lady Gaga, Coldplay, Beyoncé, Katy Perry, Bruno Mars, Madonna, The Who, Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Prince, the Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney and U2. It is always the most-watched music event of the year. In fact, last year's show was the most watched musical event of all time across all platforms and the most-watched Super Bowl halftime performance in history, reaching more than 150 million people. Pink will perform the American national anthem before the big game. Which teams are in the Super Bowl? Tom Brady is swamped by photographers after New England's win Credit: Reuters  The New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, will face the Philadelphia Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005 when they lost to the Pats.  The Eagles, the number one seeds going into the play-offs following a 13-3 season record, were crowned NFC champions following a 38-7 victory over the Minnesota Vikings. Nick Foles threw three touchdown passes to help lead his team to the Super Bowl just a few months after the Eagles lost start quarterback Carson Wentz to a serious knee injury.  London-born Jay Ajayi celebrates Philadelphia Eagles' NFC championship win  Credit: AP  Foles proved he can deliver in big games after some critics wrote off the Eagles's chances of winning the NFC title following Wentz's injury. The Vikings would have been the first team to play a Super Bowl in their home stadium. Tom Brady threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes earlier on Sunday evening as the New England Patriots made it three Super Bowl appearances in four year. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles.  Brady had been an injury doubt going into the game after requiring stitches on a hand gash picked up in training  earlier this week but starred to help lead his side to another Super Bowl.  The Patriots will equal Pittsburgh's record of six Super Bowl triumphs if they win on 4 February in Minneapolis. What are they saying? Eagles quarterback Nick Foles on reaching the Super Bowl  I haven’t even had time to really comprehend what is going on, to be honest. I don’t know if I ever will. When I was up on that stage, that’s something you dream about as a kid. In sports, everything’s a process, and you can’t give up. Everyone, when it’s a bad outing, wants to be really critical. But no one in the locker room doubted me. You just have to keep working. You’re not going to always have a great day. You should never get down. You should always learn from those experiences and look forward to working through them. Because that’s the beautiful thing, when you look back at the journey and you realise that it wasn’t always great. There were bumps in the road, but you were able to overcome them with the help of the people around you, the people that believe in you and love you. That’s a special thing, and that’s what’s so special about a moment like this, because you have an opportunity to reflect and be grateful.” Patriots quarterback Tom Brady It's pretty crazy. It's pretty amazing to be on a team that wins these kind of games. It's so great. We said whatever it takes. That was a great second half. I'm just so proud of our team. Amazing. I wasn't sure on Wednesday [whether I'd play]. I thought, out of all the plays, my season can't end on a handoff in practice. I didn't come this far to end on a handoff. It's just one of those things. So I came into the training room and wasn't quite sure what happened. But everyone did a great job of kind of getting me ready. The training staff and the doctors and Alex [Guerrero]. There was a great team effort. Without that, I definitely wouldn't be playing.  A report has claimed there is a rift between Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, coach Bill Belichick and owner Robert Kraft, but tight end Rob Gronkowski has insisted he and team-mates are not losing any sleep over it. The reputation that coach tries to get us to have is just ignore the noise. Ignore the noise from the outside and I feel like that's what myself, a lot of other players have been doing. You've just got to keep ignoring the noise and just keep our focus on what we've been doing all year and that's preparing hard, studying our opponent, getting ready mentally and physically for the big game." What are the odds? (to win the Super Bowl) New England Patriots 4/9 Philadelphia Eagles 2/1 What's our prediction? Tom Brady to go out in style with a sixth Super Bowl ring.  Predicted score:New England Patriots 26-20 Philadelphia Eagles

2018 Super Bowl LII: When is the 52nd NFL showpiece, what time does it start and who is the half-time performer?

What is it? Super Bowl 2018 is the grand final of the NFL season - American Football's showpiece event. This will be the 52nd edition and will be played between the Philadelphia Eagles and the New England Patriots in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings. When is it? Sunday, February 4. What time is kick-off? The kick-off time will be revealed at a later date. What TV channel is it on? The BBC, which means it's free-to-air, and Sky. It is expected to start around 6pm Eastern Time (11pm GMT). Who is performing in the halftime show? Justin Timberlake will headline Super Bowl LII. It will be his third time performing on the Super Bowl halftime stage, giving him the distinction of making the most appearances by an individual entertainer. He previously performed at Super Bowls XXXV (N'Sync) and XXXVIII (solo). The 10-time Grammy winner's last Super Bowl appearance came in 2004, when he infamously pulled part of Janet Jackson's costume off (a 'wardrobe malfunction),  revealing her breast on national television and causing a major controversy. Performing at the Super Bowl is one of the most coveted gigs in the business. Recent halftime acts including Lady Gaga, Coldplay, Beyoncé, Katy Perry, Bruno Mars, Madonna, The Who, Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Prince, the Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney and U2. It is always the most-watched music event of the year. In fact, last year's show was the most watched musical event of all time across all platforms and the most-watched Super Bowl halftime performance in history, reaching more than 150 million people. Pink will perform the American national anthem before the big game. Which teams are in the Super Bowl? Tom Brady is swamped by photographers after New England's win Credit: Reuters  The New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, will face the Philadelphia Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005 when they lost to the Pats.  The Eagles, the number one seeds going into the play-offs following a 13-3 season record, were crowned NFC champions following a 38-7 victory over the Minnesota Vikings. Nick Foles threw three touchdown passes to help lead his team to the Super Bowl just a few months after the Eagles lost start quarterback Carson Wentz to a serious knee injury.  London-born Jay Ajayi celebrates Philadelphia Eagles' NFC championship win  Credit: AP  Foles proved he can deliver in big games after some critics wrote off the Eagles's chances of winning the NFC title following Wentz's injury. The Vikings would have been the first team to play a Super Bowl in their home stadium. Tom Brady threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes earlier on Sunday evening as the New England Patriots made it three Super Bowl appearances in four year. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles.  Brady had been an injury doubt going into the game after requiring stitches on a hand gash picked up in training  earlier this week but starred to help lead his side to another Super Bowl.  The Patriots will equal Pittsburgh's record of six Super Bowl triumphs if they win on 4 February in Minneapolis. What are they saying? Eagles quarterback Nick Foles on reaching the Super Bowl  I haven’t even had time to really comprehend what is going on, to be honest. I don’t know if I ever will. When I was up on that stage, that’s something you dream about as a kid. In sports, everything’s a process, and you can’t give up. Everyone, when it’s a bad outing, wants to be really critical. But no one in the locker room doubted me. You just have to keep working. You’re not going to always have a great day. You should never get down. You should always learn from those experiences and look forward to working through them. Because that’s the beautiful thing, when you look back at the journey and you realise that it wasn’t always great. There were bumps in the road, but you were able to overcome them with the help of the people around you, the people that believe in you and love you. That’s a special thing, and that’s what’s so special about a moment like this, because you have an opportunity to reflect and be grateful.” Patriots quarterback Tom Brady It's pretty crazy. It's pretty amazing to be on a team that wins these kind of games. It's so great. We said whatever it takes. That was a great second half. I'm just so proud of our team. Amazing. I wasn't sure on Wednesday [whether I'd play]. I thought, out of all the plays, my season can't end on a handoff in practice. I didn't come this far to end on a handoff. It's just one of those things. So I came into the training room and wasn't quite sure what happened. But everyone did a great job of kind of getting me ready. The training staff and the doctors and Alex [Guerrero]. There was a great team effort. Without that, I definitely wouldn't be playing.  A report has claimed there is a rift between Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, coach Bill Belichick and owner Robert Kraft, but tight end Rob Gronkowski has insisted he and team-mates are not losing any sleep over it. The reputation that coach tries to get us to have is just ignore the noise. Ignore the noise from the outside and I feel like that's what myself, a lot of other players have been doing. You've just got to keep ignoring the noise and just keep our focus on what we've been doing all year and that's preparing hard, studying our opponent, getting ready mentally and physically for the big game." What are the odds? (to win the Super Bowl) New England Patriots 4/9 Philadelphia Eagles 2/1 What's our prediction? Tom Brady to go out in style with a sixth Super Bowl ring.  Predicted score:New England Patriots 26-20 Philadelphia Eagles

Philadelphia greased poles to stop Eagles fans from climbing them. It didn't work.

The last time the Philadelphia Eagles were in the Super Bowl, we only just started using MySpace and the iPod was still some newfangled thing.

So it's no wonder the city was extra careful in the lead up to the Eagles NFC Championship game against the Minnesota Vikings, because a win — taking the team to the Super Bowl — would have the place in raptures.

Last week, businesses were also warned to put everything they owned inside and keep security cameras on. Then there were the crews dubbed "Crisco Cops" who greased poles to stop people from climbing on top of them. 

Good morning from Philly where crews from the city are greasing the light poles with Crisco to prevent #Eagles fans from climbing after the #NFCChampionshipGame tonight. #Vikings pregame coverage starts at 3 on FOX9. They call themselves the #CriscoCops pic.twitter.com/w1ZkYWZhYG

— FOX 9 Sports (@Fox9Sports) January 21, 2018

Greasing poles is something of a Philly thing apparently. Police did the same thing to stop ecstatic fans climbing poles following the Phillies' 2008 baseball World Series win and the National Pennant in 2009. 

Well, the Eagles won on Sunday, and just like 2008 and 2009, thrilled fans managed to scale the city's poles. The grease did nothing.

The grease put up as much of a fight as the Vikings did pic.twitter.com/aFei9Qi5gh

— Barstool Sports (@barstoolsports) January 22, 2018

Grease pole climber! pic.twitter.com/9gbsIaNJm8

— Erica Palan (@errrica) January 22, 2018

The grease didn’t work. pic.twitter.com/it0XDv4Nvs

— Matt Gelb (@MattGelb) January 22, 2018

Clearly the Crisco wasn’t enough to keep this guy off the pole - Temple students are taking over North Broad as the EAGLES head to #SuperBowl52 pic.twitter.com/2JtXDd9ckq

— Cassie Semyon (@casssemyon) January 22, 2018

broad street pic.twitter.com/7kxbYiQmTE

— tonyp (@groovyytonyy) January 22, 2018

THE GREASED POLE CLIMBING HAS BEGUN!

(📹: @JessiThorne) pic.twitter.com/9A6mwiB9pM

— SB Nation (@SBNation) January 22, 2018

Although, in one apparent case, one man was taken out by a pole.

Unnecessary roughness on the pole. #Eagles pic.twitter.com/9vpzRzNK3d

— Jeff Eisenband (@JeffEisenband) January 22, 2018

Yep, Philly is pretty damn excited right now. Although we couldn't imagine what it'd be like if the Eagles managed to win the Super Bowl.

How ya feeling, Philly? pic.twitter.com/6Wq6rtaHrw

— Matt Katz (@mattkatz00) January 22, 2018

Philadelphia greased poles to stop Eagles fans from climbing them. It didn't work.

The last time the Philadelphia Eagles were in the Super Bowl, we only just started using MySpace and the iPod was still some newfangled thing.

So it's no wonder the city was extra careful in the lead up to the Eagles NFC Championship game against the Minnesota Vikings, because a win — taking the team to the Super Bowl — would have the place in raptures.

Last week, businesses were also warned to put everything they owned inside and keep security cameras on. Then there were the crews dubbed "Crisco Cops" who greased poles to stop people from climbing on top of them. 

Good morning from Philly where crews from the city are greasing the light poles with Crisco to prevent #Eagles fans from climbing after the #NFCChampionshipGame tonight. #Vikings pregame coverage starts at 3 on FOX9. They call themselves the #CriscoCops pic.twitter.com/w1ZkYWZhYG

— FOX 9 Sports (@Fox9Sports) January 21, 2018

Greasing poles is something of a Philly thing apparently. Police did the same thing to stop ecstatic fans climbing poles following the Phillies' 2008 baseball World Series win and the National Pennant in 2009. 

Well, the Eagles won on Sunday, and just like 2008 and 2009, thrilled fans managed to scale the city's poles. The grease did nothing.

The grease put up as much of a fight as the Vikings did pic.twitter.com/aFei9Qi5gh

— Barstool Sports (@barstoolsports) January 22, 2018

Grease pole climber! pic.twitter.com/9gbsIaNJm8

— Erica Palan (@errrica) January 22, 2018

The grease didn’t work. pic.twitter.com/it0XDv4Nvs

— Matt Gelb (@MattGelb) January 22, 2018

Clearly the Crisco wasn’t enough to keep this guy off the pole - Temple students are taking over North Broad as the EAGLES head to #SuperBowl52 pic.twitter.com/2JtXDd9ckq

— Cassie Semyon (@casssemyon) January 22, 2018

broad street pic.twitter.com/7kxbYiQmTE

— tonyp (@groovyytonyy) January 22, 2018

THE GREASED POLE CLIMBING HAS BEGUN!

(📹: @JessiThorne) pic.twitter.com/9A6mwiB9pM

— SB Nation (@SBNation) January 22, 2018

Although, in one apparent case, one man was taken out by a pole.

Unnecessary roughness on the pole. #Eagles pic.twitter.com/9vpzRzNK3d

— Jeff Eisenband (@JeffEisenband) January 22, 2018

Yep, Philly is pretty damn excited right now. Although we couldn't imagine what it'd be like if the Eagles managed to win the Super Bowl.

How ya feeling, Philly? pic.twitter.com/6Wq6rtaHrw

— Matt Katz (@mattkatz00) January 22, 2018

Football: Die Saison der vielen Probleme im American Football

Quarterback Tom Brady (l.) könnte den Patriots im Halbfinale gegen die Jacksonville Jaguars fehlen

Der richtige Antrieb

Beim American Football geht es oft heiß her, wie sehr, sehen wir hier. Der Spieler von den Green Bay Packers hat ganz offensichtlich ordentlich Feuer im Hintern. (Bild: icanhascheezburger.com)

Former England Sevens star Alex Gray signs contract with Atlanta Falcons

Alex Gray has continued his progress in American football by signing a reserve future contract with the Atlanta Falcons. Gray spent the current NFL season, which ended for the Falcons last Saturday with a 15-10 defeat to the Philadelphia Eagles in the divisional round of the play-offs, on Atlanta's practice squad. The 26 year-old tight-end featured for the Super Bowl LI runners-up during pre-season, but was ineligible during the regular campaign after graduating through the international player pathway programme. However, this deal ensures he will be under contract once the new NFL year begins in early March. The Falcons roster could swell to 90, and Gray will have a chance to fight for his place on the final 53-man squad. !!Contract Signed!! Not many will know what it took to get to this point. Thank you to everyone who believed in me from day 1. This is just the start, but I can’t wait to give it everything I’ve got �� pic.twitter.com/YW3oLPCWlP— Alex Gray (@AlexShaggyGray) January 17, 2018 Gray, a former back-rower who captained England Under-20 and then enjoyed a successful spell in the England Sevens set-up, spoke exclusively to The Telegraph  last year. He explained the intensive six-week training camp that earned his involvement with the Falcons. “I was in training at 7am, leaving at 7pm, having 45 minutes for dinner and then from 7.45 to 11pm I was in my books all night. That was for six weeks. “I had to study a mixture of what they call ‘player packages’, so you know who is on the field, formations, concepts, play calls, defensive coverages. “You need to get the calling structure and it’s not easy. Even if you had no opposition taking your head off it is hard enough to get your head round and do it to the detail you want. I’ve learnt well over 100 calls so far, and lots more concepts.” Head coach Dan Quinn has been impressed with the start @AlexShaggyGray has made at @AtlantaFalcons training camp ������ pic.twitter.com/QASS4M1uti— NFL UK (@NFLUK) July 31, 2017 Gray clearly impressed the Falcons management and also inspired Christian Scotland-Williamson, who revealed to The Telegraph that he has decided to take up a similar opportunity. The Worcester Warriors lock left his Premiership outfit at the end of last year and has arrived in the United States to begin the transition to his new sport.

VIDEO: Barcelona Legend Andres Iniesta Swaps the Nou Camp for American Football in Hilarious Advert

Barcelona legend Andres Iniesta swapped the turf of the Nou Camp for the day to try a very different sport: American football. ​ Proving there is a first time for everything, the product of La Masia battles takes on a new challenge in an advertising campaign of an online broker.  ​ The new campaign was released to encourage the general public to 'try something new' and sees the small Spanish midfielder seemingly out of his depth engaging in a face off with a team of American football giants. ...

VIDEO: Barcelona Legend Andres Iniesta Swaps the Nou Camp for American Football in Hilarious Advert

Barcelona legend Andres Iniesta swapped the turf of the Nou Camp for the day to try a very different sport: American football. ​ Proving there is a first time for everything, the product of La Masia battles takes on a new challenge in an advertising campaign of an online broker.  ​ The new campaign was released to encourage the general public to 'try something new' and sees the small Spanish midfielder seemingly out of his depth engaging in a face off with a team of American football giants. ...

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

The Piggies: The Best Things I Ate During the 2017 College Football Season

I considered writing an end-of-season awards column that looked back on the finest moments of the football season that just ended. But everyone does that. What I haven’t done yet is taken a look back at all the calories I consumed over a football season. That needs to be rectified, so today in Punt, Pass & Pork we’re going to hand out the Piggies.

These awards will honor the best things I ate all season. For official purposes, we’re going to define the college football season as “anything between the day I left the house for the trip that included SEC Media Days and the national title game.” Why not stretch back into the spring so we can encompass the entire year? Because the Offseason Piggies sure sounds like a column I could write in July. I’m franchise building here.

So without further ado, let’s hand out the Piggies for the 2017 college football season.

Best breakfast

The breakfast options should be excellent in America’s Brunchingest State, but Georgia came stronger than usual this season. I considered the challah souffle from Atlanta’s Oy!, but the winner was the breakfast (for lunch) that I ate at Mama’s Boy in Athens in November.

The pulled pork hash features pulled pork over home fries with a drizzle of mustard-based barbecue sauce and two poached eggs on top. Break those yolks, mix it all together and dig in. I also had a short stack of the fig and rosemary pancakes. I didn’t have room for a football-sized cinnamon roll, but I’m getting one next time.

Most weirdly wonderful dish

The Chili Cheese Takoyaki at Austin’s Kemuri Tatsuya is, essentially, Frito Pie with octopus fritters instead of brisket. Whereas the brisket has a similar flavor profile to the chili in the original dish, the octopus adds a lighter, brighter element to a gut-busting Texas staple. Besides, at Kemuri Tatsuya, you should get your brisket with your ramen.

Spiciest moment

While researching my Hot Chicken Power Rankings in Nashville, I resolved to try the hottest version available at each restaurant. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack—which finished No. 1 in the rankings—does not lie about the heat of its Extra Extra Extra Hot.

Best meal I haven’t written about yet (but will)

What Atlanta’s Superica considers a mixed fajita plate is so far beyond the sizzling platters served everywhere else that it needs a better name. Perfectly cooked steak, juicy chicken and a giant hunk of grilled pork belly form a meat mountain and await their trip to the tortilla. I’m ruined for every other fajita plate from this point forward.

Best giant piece of meat I haven’t written about yet (but will)

Galliano in New Orleans serves a “prime rib for two” that I decided to eat myself (twice in a week). This 32- to 40-ounce, bone-in beast is best served rare.

Best dish that made someone say “We need to take a picture of your meat”

That’s exactly what the lady at the table next to me at Pittsburgh’s Gaucho Parrilla Argentina said when my asado platter arrived. She took photos, and so did I. Then I feasted on a glorious selection of cuts at this unpretentious Argentinian steakhouse.

Best hidden gem

I’ve never been cool enough to be told about the hip, unmarked-door spots. But I did luck into one in Seattle. If you can find it, and if you can get in, Tsukushinbo is the sushi secret you’ll happily tell everyone.

Best Burger

Everyone has a bacon burger. Quite a few places now have an avocado burger. But Madison Social in Tallahassee, Fla., combines thick-cut bacon with fried avocado on its MadSo Burger. Frying the avocado makes the burger even richer, yet it somehow tastes lighter and fresher at the same time. It’s a marvel of fryer engineering.

Most delightfully named restaurant I reviewed

The winner is Curry Up Now in Palo Alto, Calif. Aside from having a wonderfully punny name, this place marries the Indian/British gravy-based concept of tikka masala with the Canadian gravy-based concept of poutine. The result? Lamb tikka masala fries.

Most delightfully named restaurant I didn’t review

That honor goes to Pho Shizzle, a bargain-priced joint in Renton, Wash., that—judging by the numerous photos on the walls—is a favorite of Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin. The place was good but not spectacular. I asked the lady behind the counter if they’d ever considered making T-shirts—which would be spectacular—and she looked at me like I’d just landed from another planet.

Best wings

This was a difficult choice between the Sticky Wings at Mint in New Orleans and the charcoal-grilled wings at Atlanta’s Minero. The Minero wings are the winner for two reasons. First, the grilling process has a higher degree of difficulty than frying. Second, Minero’s location at Ponce City Market means I can walk across the hall and eat raw cookie dough by the scoop from Batter.

Best example of truth in advertising

On the surface, the idea of a bacon-themed bar in New York seems too schticky and concept-y to actually be good. But BarBacon succeeds by going all in. The menu opens with an appetizer that includes samples of four different kinds of bacon, and it only gets better from there.

Best dessert that can get you drunk

The fine bartenders at Frank in Austin mix a mean Old Fashioned, but they also mix a sweet one. It’s the same bourbon and bitters from your favorite cocktail, but mixed with ice cream and served in shake form. When you’ve eaten everything above this, you need something special to wash it down.

Want to read more of Andy’s culinary adventures? SI Eats covers every moment where food, sports and culture collide

A Random Ranking

In honor of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa’s incredible work replacing starter Jalen Hurts in the second half of the national title game, we’re going to rank the top five television cast additions who either saved their shows or made them even better.

1. Steve Urkel (Jaleel White)

Urkel was supposed to be an occasionally recurring character during season one of Perfect Strangers spinoff Family Matters. By the start of season two, he was the show’s biggest star. In fact, he got so much attention that no one noticed when Judy Winslow disappeared in season four.

2. Rebecca Howe (Kirstie Alley)

Cheers could have withered and died without Shelley Long’s Diane Chambers, but Alley combined with Ted Danson to drive plot lines that ultimately were better than the early Diane stories.

3. Ben Wyatt and Chris Traeger (Adam Scott and Rob Lowe)

These two helped a flagging Parks and Recreation find its voice. And Lowe’s Traeger allowed us to see this classic Ron Swanson scene.

4. Jefferson D’Arcy (Ted McGinley)

David Garrison’s Steve Rhoades was Al and Peg Bundy’s obnoxious yuppie neighbor for the first four seasons of Married…With Children. But when Garrison left to pursue more stage work, his character’s wife Marcy divorced Rhoades and married Jefferson D’Arcy, who was played by McGinley—aka The Patron Saint of Shark Jumping. But McGinley didn’t ruin this show. Rhoades was too obvious a foil for Al. McGinley’s D’Arcy wound up settling into the show as the occasional dimwitted accomplice for the Bundy patriarch.

5. Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan)

Star Trek: Voyager needed a spark, and it got it thanks to a reformed Borg.

Three And Out

1. At its annual convention last week, the American Football Coaches Association put forth its proposal for a change to the redshirt rule in football. The coaches would like to change the rule to allow any player who played four or fewer games to receive a redshirt. (Players still would only be able to redshirt once in a career unless they receive an injury waiver.)

Three conferences have backed this proposal, so it has a good chance of getting through the NCAA legislative process intact. And as AFCA president Todd Berry points out, it’s difficult to find a problem with it. Rosters get depleted because of injuries and other factors as the season goes on, so it would make sense for coaches to have the option to play freshmen toward the end of the season without burning an entire season of eligibility. And since bowl games represent a jump start on the next season for the teams outside the playoff, those teams could begin to see where those redshirted players fit. Plus, if a star sits out a bowl game, it might be a nice consolation to get a first look at a four- or five-star recruit who has been on the bench all season.

Berry said he imagines coaches in other sports might object to this proposal applying only to football, but that shouldn’t be a problem, either. Why not let every sport use the same system and the same number (one-third of the regular season)? Basketball coaches, who rarely redshirt players, probably wouldn’t do it much more because it’s less practical than in football. And football coaches who need to play freshmen extensively would still do it. A prime example? National champion Alabama, which used a true freshman quarterback, left tackle, tailback and receivers in crunch time of the national title game.

2. Speaking of the Tide, here’s the SI cover story on their win in the title game.

3. New LSU offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger has no time for the doubters in the media. (Which is good. Because if the Tigers don’t score in bunches next season, he’s going to have plenty of doubters.)

What’s Eating Andy?

Rest in peace to the man whose voice was college football.

What’s Andy Eating?

You can’t possibly still be hungry after reading about all that decadence at the top of this column, can you? To snap you out of that mindset, here’s a look at what I should be eating exclusively for the next few weeks.

Manchester City chase Fred, Shakhtar Donetsk's Brazilian midfielder

Manchester City are working on a deal to sign Fred, the Brazil midfielder, from Shakhtar Donetsk. The Premier League leaders have identified the 24-year-old as a primary defensive midfield target as they seek quality long-term cover for Fernandinho and with Yaya Toure expected to be released when his contract expires at the end of the season. City have not prioritised the recruitment of a defensive midfielder in this month’s transfer window but they do want a player who can fill the “No. 6” position that Fernandinho, another Brazilian, occupies in place for the start of the summer, ideally before the World Cup commences in mid-June. Yet City are conscious that the price for Fred has increased significantly since they first entered into informal discussions with Shakhtar last year and hope to secure a breakthrough before the costs continue to escalate amid reported interest from Manchester United, Arsenal and others. Sergei Palkin, the Shakhtar chief executive, is thought to have travelled to Manchester in the wake of the clubs’ Champions League match in Ukraine on Dec. 6 as talks over a potential deal continued. City and Shakhtar, who sold Fernandinho to the Manchester club for £30 million in 2013, have a good working relationship but hopes of signing Fred for a similar fee have faded and the price is now thought to have risen to in excess of £40 million. Fernandinho was signed from Shakhtar in 2013 Credit: REUTERS Shakhtar, who face Roma in the last 16 of the Champions League, are reluctant to lose Fred in mid-season and City, conscious the player would be ineligible to play for them in the competition this term, would be happy for him to see out the campaign in Ukraine with a view to joining in the summer. Fred’s career has not been without controversy. He tested positive for the banned diuretic hydrochlorothiazide while representing Brazil at the Copa America in June 2015. In December of that year, he was initially banned by the South American Football Federation from playing in any CONMEBOL sanctioned competitions for one year, with the suspension backdated to June 2015. However, in February 2016, the ban was extended by Fifa to include all football worldwide.   Fernandinho is on the verge of signing a new contract with City but he will be 33 in May and Guardiola is concerned they are overly reliant on him in that position. The situation will become more pressing with Toure – 35 in May - likely to depart at the end of his eighth season with the club. Yaya Toure's time at Man City will be coming to an end soon Credit: REUTERS Fred impressed Guardiola in both Champions League group stage matches against City, who won the home game 2-0 but lost the away fixture 2-1, and the player has admitted he would like to play under the Catalan. “A friend gave me the news saying that City and Guardiola were interested in me,” he reportedly told Gazetta dello Sport. “At the exit of the locker room, he [Guardiola] stopped me and said we had a good game. But he did not ask me to play with him. "However, I confess, I wait impatiently for his call to arrive now. I think I would grow a lot with him. England is the best league in the world and I’ve always dreamed of playing there.” Having been the firm favourites to sign Alexis Sanchez, City pulled out of the running for the Arsenal striker this week after balking at the cost of the deal. However, they remain keen to sign a centre half before the window shuts on Jan. 31 and have held talks with West Bromwich Albion over £20 million rated Northern Ireland defender Jonny Evans.

Manchester City chase Fred, Shakhtar Donetsk's Brazilian midfielder

Manchester City are working on a deal to sign Fred, the Brazil midfielder, from Shakhtar Donetsk. The Premier League leaders have identified the 24-year-old as a primary defensive midfield target as they seek quality long-term cover for Fernandinho and with Yaya Toure expected to be released when his contract expires at the end of the season. City have not prioritised the recruitment of a defensive midfielder in this month’s transfer window but they do want a player who can fill the “No. 6” position that Fernandinho, another Brazilian, occupies in place for the start of the summer, ideally before the World Cup commences in mid-June. Yet City are conscious that the price for Fred has increased significantly since they first entered into informal discussions with Shakhtar last year and hope to secure a breakthrough before the costs continue to escalate amid reported interest from Manchester United, Arsenal and others. Sergei Palkin, the Shakhtar chief executive, is thought to have travelled to Manchester in the wake of the clubs’ Champions League match in Ukraine on Dec. 6 as talks over a potential deal continued. City and Shakhtar, who sold Fernandinho to the Manchester club for £30 million in 2013, have a good working relationship but hopes of signing Fred for a similar fee have faded and the price is now thought to have risen to in excess of £40 million. Fernandinho was signed from Shakhtar in 2013 Credit: REUTERS Shakhtar, who face Roma in the last 16 of the Champions League, are reluctant to lose Fred in mid-season and City, conscious the player would be ineligible to play for them in the competition this term, would be happy for him to see out the campaign in Ukraine with a view to joining in the summer. Fred’s career has not been without controversy. He tested positive for the banned diuretic hydrochlorothiazide while representing Brazil at the Copa America in June 2015. In December of that year, he was initially banned by the South American Football Federation from playing in any CONMEBOL sanctioned competitions for one year, with the suspension backdated to June 2015. However, in February 2016, the ban was extended by Fifa to include all football worldwide.   Fernandinho is on the verge of signing a new contract with City but he will be 33 in May and Guardiola is concerned they are overly reliant on him in that position. The situation will become more pressing with Toure – 35 in May - likely to depart at the end of his eighth season with the club. Yaya Toure's time at Man City will be coming to an end soon Credit: REUTERS Fred impressed Guardiola in both Champions League group stage matches against City, who won the home game 2-0 but lost the away fixture 2-1, and the player has admitted he would like to play under the Catalan. “A friend gave me the news saying that City and Guardiola were interested in me,” he reportedly told Gazetta dello Sport. “At the exit of the locker room, he [Guardiola] stopped me and said we had a good game. But he did not ask me to play with him. "However, I confess, I wait impatiently for his call to arrive now. I think I would grow a lot with him. England is the best league in the world and I’ve always dreamed of playing there.” Having been the firm favourites to sign Alexis Sanchez, City pulled out of the running for the Arsenal striker this week after balking at the cost of the deal. However, they remain keen to sign a centre half before the window shuts on Jan. 31 and have held talks with West Bromwich Albion over £20 million rated Northern Ireland defender Jonny Evans.

Manchester City chase Fred, Shakhtar Donetsk's Brazilian midfielder

Manchester City are working on a deal to sign Fred, the Brazil midfielder, from Shakhtar Donetsk. The Premier League leaders have identified the 24-year-old as a primary defensive midfield target as they seek quality long-term cover for Fernandinho and with Yaya Toure expected to be released when his contract expires at the end of the season. City have not prioritised the recruitment of a defensive midfielder in this month’s transfer window but they do want a player who can fill the “No. 6” position that Fernandinho, another Brazilian, occupies in place for the start of the summer, ideally before the World Cup commences in mid-June. Yet City are conscious that the price for Fred has increased significantly since they first entered into informal discussions with Shakhtar last year and hope to secure a breakthrough before the costs continue to escalate amid reported interest from Manchester United, Arsenal and others. Sergei Palkin, the Shakhtar chief executive, is thought to have travelled to Manchester in the wake of the clubs’ Champions League match in Ukraine on Dec. 6 as talks over a potential deal continued. City and Shakhtar, who sold Fernandinho to the Manchester club for £30 million in 2013, have a good working relationship but hopes of signing Fred for a similar fee have faded and the price is now thought to have risen to in excess of £40 million. Fernandinho was signed from Shakhtar in 2013 Credit: REUTERS Shakhtar, who face Roma in the last 16 of the Champions League, are reluctant to lose Fred in mid-season and City, conscious the player would be ineligible to play for them in the competition this term, would be happy for him to see out the campaign in Ukraine with a view to joining in the summer. Fred’s career has not been without controversy. He tested positive for the banned diuretic hydrochlorothiazide while representing Brazil at the Copa America in June 2015. In December of that year, he was initially banned by the South American Football Federation from playing in any CONMEBOL sanctioned competitions for one year, with the suspension backdated to June 2015. However, in February 2016, the ban was extended by Fifa to include all football worldwide.   Fernandinho is on the verge of signing a new contract with City but he will be 33 in May and Guardiola is concerned they are overly reliant on him in that position. The situation will become more pressing with Toure – 35 in May - likely to depart at the end of his eighth season with the club. Yaya Toure's time at Man City will be coming to an end soon Credit: REUTERS Fred impressed Guardiola in both Champions League group stage matches against City, who won the home game 2-0 but lost the away fixture 2-1, and the player has admitted he would like to play under the Catalan. “A friend gave me the news saying that City and Guardiola were interested in me,” he reportedly told Gazetta dello Sport. “At the exit of the locker room, he [Guardiola] stopped me and said we had a good game. But he did not ask me to play with him. "However, I confess, I wait impatiently for his call to arrive now. I think I would grow a lot with him. England is the best league in the world and I’ve always dreamed of playing there.” Having been the firm favourites to sign Alexis Sanchez, City pulled out of the running for the Arsenal striker this week after balking at the cost of the deal. However, they remain keen to sign a centre half before the window shuts on Jan. 31 and have held talks with West Bromwich Albion over £20 million rated Northern Ireland defender Jonny Evans.

Novak Djokovic shocks tennis officials by suggesting boycott of next year's Australian Open

The former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has shocked tennis officials by floating the possibility of a player boycott of next year’s Australian Open. Djokovic delivered his dramatic suggestion on Friday night, as the annual men’s player meeting in Melbourne – which is attended by around 150 of the world’s best – was drawing to a close. It was part of an unexpected speech, intended to apply pressure to the tour – and especially the grand slams – to deliver bigger pay packets. Djokovic had clearly been preparing his ambush for some time, as he invited a professor of labour law to join him on the podium and discuss the finer points of trade unions. In order to organise a boycott, the argument went, it would be necessary to set up a new union that represented only the players. Because the Association of Tennis Professionals – which is constituted of equal parts players and tournaments – is legally unable to call a strike. It is not that the Australian Open is less popular with the players than other grand slams; quite the reverse, in fact. Only an hour earlier, tournament director Craig Tiley had been telling the meeting that he intended to raise the total prize pot from A$55m this year to over A$100m in the next five years. Tiley, who doubles up as chief executive of Tennis Australia, is seen as the most player-friendly official around. Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Rather, there are thought to be legal reasons why a strike might be easier to organise here in Melbourne than in London, Paris or New York. Djokovic’s argument is that the grand slams only pay out around seven per cent of their income, whereas the equivalent figure in American basketball – which was cited as a point of comparison in the meeting – is around 50 per cent. It is understood that Andy Murray, who attended the meeting despite his recent hip surgery, is supportive of the principle that players should be better paid. Roger Federer, however, is believed to favour the status quo in which one body – the ATP – represents the main interests of men’s tennis. Credit: AP Approached after his practice session yesterday, Djokovic declined to comment on his political stance. But his old friend and ally Viktor Troicki was more outspoken in a briefing with Serbian journalists. “Novak is right,” Troicki said. “The grand slams are raising the prize money, but their income gets bigger and bigger. A Players’ Union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what grand slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.” This point was backed up in more temperate terms by Ryan Harrison, the American No. 4, who told reporters “I think there’s a big case to be made as far as percentage goes. If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at grand slams.” Djokovic’s most zealous supporters are believed to include Gilles Simon – who, like Djokovic himself, is an elected member of the ATP player council – and the fast-rising world No. 4 Alexander Zverev. As well as calling for better redistribution of tournaments’ income streams, these players are thought to resent the grand slams’ insistence on paying equal prize-money to men and women. Gillles Simon pictured playing in the Australian Open Credit: AFP Simon was consulted on his views yesterday in his post-match press conference. He replied that “I don’t share my opinions anymore, because I am really disappointed in the press [coverage] that I had.” But he did concede that he hadn’t changed his opinions recently. In other words, he probably still believes that – as he said in 2012 – “The equality in salaries isn't something that works in sport. Men's tennis remains more attractive than women's tennis at the moment." Djokovic was elected as president of the ATP Player Council in September. His immediate predecessors – doubles specialist Eric Butorac from 2014 to 2016, and Federer before that – had taken a co-operative approach to dealing with the grand slams, who have increased prize money substantially in the past decade. Djokovic is taking a more confrontational stance, although his vice-president Kevin Anderson tried to sound diplomatic yesterday. “Things have got a lot better from where we were four to five years ago,” Anderson said. “Now if you are top 100 you are making a good living. I think we want to push that to 150, 200 and keep going. “I can completely understand that guys feel they want more,” Anderson added. “I think we do deserve more. But I also understand the opposite perspective.”

Novak Djokovic shocks tennis officials by suggesting boycott of next year's Australian Open

The former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has shocked tennis officials by floating the possibility of a player boycott of next year’s Australian Open. Djokovic delivered his dramatic suggestion on Friday night, as the annual men’s player meeting in Melbourne – which is attended by around 150 of the world’s best – was drawing to a close. It was part of an unexpected speech, intended to apply pressure to the tour – and especially the grand slams – to deliver bigger pay packets. Djokovic had clearly been preparing his ambush for some time, as he invited a professor of labour law to join him on the podium and discuss the finer points of trade unions. In order to organise a boycott, the argument went, it would be necessary to set up a new union that represented only the players. Because the Association of Tennis Professionals – which is constituted of equal parts players and tournaments – is legally unable to call a strike. It is not that the Australian Open is less popular with the players than other grand slams; quite the reverse, in fact. Only an hour earlier, tournament director Craig Tiley had been telling the meeting that he intended to raise the total prize pot from A$55m this year to over A$100m in the next five years. Tiley, who doubles up as chief executive of Tennis Australia, is seen as the most player-friendly official around. Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Rather, there are thought to be legal reasons why a strike might be easier to organise here in Melbourne than in London, Paris or New York. Djokovic’s argument is that the grand slams only pay out around seven per cent of their income, whereas the equivalent figure in American basketball – which was cited as a point of comparison in the meeting – is around 50 per cent. It is understood that Andy Murray, who attended the meeting despite his recent hip surgery, is supportive of the principle that players should be better paid. Roger Federer, however, is believed to favour the status quo in which one body – the ATP – represents the main interests of men’s tennis. Credit: AP Approached after his practice session yesterday, Djokovic declined to comment on his political stance. But his old friend and ally Viktor Troicki was more outspoken in a briefing with Serbian journalists. “Novak is right,” Troicki said. “The grand slams are raising the prize money, but their income gets bigger and bigger. A Players’ Union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what grand slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.” This point was backed up in more temperate terms by Ryan Harrison, the American No. 4, who told reporters “I think there’s a big case to be made as far as percentage goes. If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at grand slams.” Djokovic’s most zealous supporters are believed to include Gilles Simon – who, like Djokovic himself, is an elected member of the ATP player council – and the fast-rising world No. 4 Alexander Zverev. As well as calling for better redistribution of tournaments’ income streams, these players are thought to resent the grand slams’ insistence on paying equal prize-money to men and women. Gillles Simon pictured playing in the Australian Open Credit: AFP Simon was consulted on his views yesterday in his post-match press conference. He replied that “I don’t share my opinions anymore, because I am really disappointed in the press [coverage] that I had.” But he did concede that he hadn’t changed his opinions recently. In other words, he probably still believes that – as he said in 2012 – “The equality in salaries isn't something that works in sport. Men's tennis remains more attractive than women's tennis at the moment." Djokovic was elected as president of the ATP Player Council in September. His immediate predecessors – doubles specialist Eric Butorac from 2014 to 2016, and Federer before that – had taken a co-operative approach to dealing with the grand slams, who have increased prize money substantially in the past decade. Djokovic is taking a more confrontational stance, although his vice-president Kevin Anderson tried to sound diplomatic yesterday. “Things have got a lot better from where we were four to five years ago,” Anderson said. “Now if you are top 100 you are making a good living. I think we want to push that to 150, 200 and keep going. “I can completely understand that guys feel they want more,” Anderson added. “I think we do deserve more. But I also understand the opposite perspective.”

Novak Djokovic shocks tennis officials by suggesting boycott of next year's Australian Open

The former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has shocked tennis officials by floating the possibility of a player boycott of next year’s Australian Open. Djokovic delivered his dramatic suggestion on Friday night, as the annual men’s player meeting in Melbourne – which is attended by around 150 of the world’s best – was drawing to a close. It was part of an unexpected speech, intended to apply pressure to the tour – and especially the grand slams – to deliver bigger pay packets. Djokovic had clearly been preparing his ambush for some time, as he invited a professor of labour law to join him on the podium and discuss the finer points of trade unions. In order to organise a boycott, the argument went, it would be necessary to set up a new union that represented only the players. Because the Association of Tennis Professionals – which is constituted of equal parts players and tournaments – is legally unable to call a strike. It is not that the Australian Open is less popular with the players than other grand slams; quite the reverse, in fact. Only an hour earlier, tournament director Craig Tiley had been telling the meeting that he intended to raise the total prize pot from A$55m this year to over A$100m in the next five years. Tiley, who doubles up as chief executive of Tennis Australia, is seen as the most player-friendly official around. Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Rather, there are thought to be legal reasons why a strike might be easier to organise here in Melbourne than in London, Paris or New York. Djokovic’s argument is that the grand slams only pay out around seven per cent of their income, whereas the equivalent figure in American basketball – which was cited as a point of comparison in the meeting – is around 50 per cent. It is understood that Andy Murray, who attended the meeting despite his recent hip surgery, is supportive of the principle that players should be better paid. Roger Federer, however, is believed to favour the status quo in which one body – the ATP – represents the main interests of men’s tennis. Credit: AP Approached after his practice session yesterday, Djokovic declined to comment on his political stance. But his old friend and ally Viktor Troicki was more outspoken in a briefing with Serbian journalists. “Novak is right,” Troicki said. “The grand slams are raising the prize money, but their income gets bigger and bigger. A Players’ Union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what grand slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.” This point was backed up in more temperate terms by Ryan Harrison, the American No. 4, who told reporters “I think there’s a big case to be made as far as percentage goes. If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at grand slams.” Djokovic’s most zealous supporters are believed to include Gilles Simon – who, like Djokovic himself, is an elected member of the ATP player council – and the fast-rising world No. 4 Alexander Zverev. As well as calling for better redistribution of tournaments’ income streams, these players are thought to resent the grand slams’ insistence on paying equal prize-money to men and women. Gillles Simon pictured playing in the Australian Open Credit: AFP Simon was consulted on his views yesterday in his post-match press conference. He replied that “I don’t share my opinions anymore, because I am really disappointed in the press [coverage] that I had.” But he did concede that he hadn’t changed his opinions recently. In other words, he probably still believes that – as he said in 2012 – “The equality in salaries isn't something that works in sport. Men's tennis remains more attractive than women's tennis at the moment." Djokovic was elected as president of the ATP Player Council in September. His immediate predecessors – doubles specialist Eric Butorac from 2014 to 2016, and Federer before that – had taken a co-operative approach to dealing with the grand slams, who have increased prize money substantially in the past decade. Djokovic is taking a more confrontational stance, although his vice-president Kevin Anderson tried to sound diplomatic yesterday. “Things have got a lot better from where we were four to five years ago,” Anderson said. “Now if you are top 100 you are making a good living. I think we want to push that to 150, 200 and keep going. “I can completely understand that guys feel they want more,” Anderson added. “I think we do deserve more. But I also understand the opposite perspective.”

American Football: NFL: Vikings siegen durch Touchdown in letzter Sekunde

Stefon Diggs bescherte den Vikings mit seinem Touchdown den Einzug ins Halbfinale

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger is sacked by Jacksonville Jaguars defensive tackle Marcell Dareus in the first half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. EFE

Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette celebrates his touchdown against the Pittsburgh Steelers in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. EFE

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown hurdles Jacksonville Jaguars defenders following a catch in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. EFE

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger throws a pass against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. EFE

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and running back Le'Veon Bell stand on the sideline together in the final seconds of the game against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. EFE

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Doug Marrone looks on against the Pittsburgh Steelers in the first half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and running back Le'Veon Bell stand on the sideline together in the final seconds of the game against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown hurdles Jacksonville Jaguars defenders following a catch in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018 (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown hurdles Jacksonville Jaguars defenders following a catch in the second half of the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Jacksonville Jaguars outside linebacker Telvin Smith celebrates with fans following their 45-42 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers during the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger walks off of the field following their 45-42 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars during the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Pittsburgh Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell walks off of the field following their 45-42 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars during the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

JWX. Pittsburgh (United States), 14/01/2018.- Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette walks off of the field while being interviewed following their 45-42 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers during the NFL American Football game at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 14 January 2018. (Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/JARED WICKERHAM

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