Juventus-Lazio

Grande sfida nell'anticipo delle 18 della tredicesima giornata di Serie A.

Il Napoli batte il Milan, alla Roma il derby

Il Napoli ha sconfitto il Milan 2-1 nel secondo anticipo della 13esima giornata e allunga in classifica in attesa dei match di Juve e Inter. Nel primo anticipo la Roma ha conquistato il derby con la Lazio, agganciando momentaneamente l'Inter al terzo posto. Oggi gli altri match tra cui spiccano Sampdoria-Juventus alle 15 e Inter-Atalanta nel posticipo delle 20,45. Ci sono anche Benevento-Sassuolo, SPAL-Fiorentina, Torino-Chievo e Udinese-Cagliari. Domani si chiude con Verona-Bologna.

Il Napoli batte il Milan, alla Roma il derby

Il Napoli ha sconfitto il Milan 2-1 nel secondo anticipo della 13esima giornata e allunga in classifica in attesa dei match di Juve e Inter. Nel primo anticipo la Roma ha conquistato il derby con la Lazio, agganciando momentaneamente l'Inter al terzo posto. Oggi gli altri match tra cui spiccano Sampdoria-Juventus alle 15 e Inter-Atalanta nel posticipo delle 20,45. Ci sono anche Benevento-Sassuolo, SPAL-Fiorentina, Torino-Chievo e Udinese-Cagliari. Domani si chiude con Verona-Bologna.

Il Napoli batte il Milan, alla Roma il derby

Il Napoli ha sconfitto il Milan 2-1 nel secondo anticipo della 13esima giornata e allunga in classifica in attesa dei match di Juve e Inter. Nel primo anticipo la Roma ha conquistato il derby con la Lazio, agganciando momentaneamente l'Inter al terzo posto. Oggi gli altri match tra cui spiccano Sampdoria-Juventus alle 15 e Inter-Atalanta nel posticipo delle 20,45. Ci sono anche Benevento-Sassuolo, SPAL-Fiorentina, Torino-Chievo e Udinese-Cagliari. Domani si chiude con Verona-Bologna.

Coppe in tv: Napoli-Shakhtar su Canale 5, Milan-Austria Vienna su Tv8

Tra martedì e giovedì prossimi, le gare europee di Napoli e Milan saranno visibili in chiaro. Non così quelle di Juventus, Roma, Lazio e Atalanta.

La serie A riparte con due big match

La serie A riparte oggi dopo il fallimento della nazionale e lo fa subito con due big match. Alle 18 oltre 60 mila tifosi allo stadio Olimpico per Roma-Lazio, un derby capitolino che da anni non era così importante per l'alta classifica. Alle 20.45 poi la capolista Napoli ospita al San Paolo un Milan che cerca di risalire la china dopo una difficile partenza in campionato. Domani il resto del turno: spiccano la trasferta della Juventus a Marassi contro la Sampdoria e la sfida tra Inter e Atalanta nel posticipo di San Siro.

La serie A riparte con due big match

La serie A riparte oggi dopo il fallimento della nazionale e lo fa subito con due big match. Alle 18 oltre 60 mila tifosi allo stadio Olimpico per Roma-Lazio, un derby capitolino che da anni non era così importante per l'alta classifica. Alle 20.45 poi la capolista Napoli ospita al San Paolo un Milan che cerca di risalire la china dopo una difficile partenza in campionato. Domani il resto del turno: spiccano la trasferta della Juventus a Marassi contro la Sampdoria e la sfida tra Inter e Atalanta nel posticipo di San Siro.

La serie A riparte con due big match

La serie A riparte oggi dopo il fallimento della nazionale e lo fa subito con due big match. Alle 18 oltre 60 mila tifosi allo stadio Olimpico per Roma-Lazio, un derby capitolino che da anni non era così importante per l'alta classifica. Alle 20.45 poi la capolista Napoli ospita al San Paolo un Milan che cerca di risalire la china dopo una difficile partenza in campionato. Domani il resto del turno: spiccano la trasferta della Juventus a Marassi contro la Sampdoria e la sfida tra Inter e Atalanta nel posticipo di San Siro.

Roma e Lazio fazem dérbi quente na capital italiana; Napoli pega o Milan

No domingo, a Juventus visita a Sampdoria, enquanto a Inter recebe a Atalanta

Roma e Lazio fazem dérbi quente na capital italiana; Napoli pega o Milan

No domingo, a Juventus visita a Sampdoria, enquanto a Inter recebe a Atalanta

Juventus-Lazio, Daspo per 11 tifosi per striscione contro Polizia

Giampiero Ventura was the wrong choice for Italy but further issues behind the scenes are preventing a renaissance

It tells you everything about the Italy manager Giampiero Ventura that the 69-year-old’s World Cup qualifying campaign in charge of the team had been so bad that, had his side beaten Sweden in the play-offs, there was still a chance he would be replaced before the finals next summer. As it was the old boy looked lost on the touchline as his side fizzled out in a 0-0 draw at San Siro, losing 1-0 on aggregate, the very antithesis of the capable, shrewd coach that Italy has exported to the world, and he did not turn up for his post-match press conference until well past midnight. As of Tuesday afternoon he had still failed to resign, assumed to be hanging on for what is a €600,000 compensation clause written into the second contract he has signed with the Italian football federation (FIGC). When Italy went out of the 2014 World Cup at the group stages, the resignation of coach Cesare Prandelli was immediate and so too was that of Giancarlo Abete, then president of the FIGC. It is the way they prefer it in times of national crisis although there has been no recent failure like this in Italy, an international force with four World Cups stars on the Azzurri shirt and a constant in tournaments, if rarely the great entertainers. Ventura was a poor choice but then when you look at the calibre of the man who selected him, the current FIGC president Carlo Tavecchio, then it is little surprise. Three years ago the 74-year-old was banned by Fifa and sanctioned by Uefa for a diatribe about the falling numbers of Italian players in Serie A in which he referred to a fictitious African player “who previously ate bananas and then suddenly became a first team player at Lazio”. He has also disparaged women, remarking how he previously regarded them as being “handicapped” when it came to sport. As of Tuesday afternoon, Tavecchio had also not resigned, although it would be fair to say that on his long list of personal shortcomings, appointing a manager who failed to get Italy to a World Cup finals for the first time in 60 years might not even make the top five. Carlo Tavecchio on the touchline at San Siro Credit: getty images There is a distinct feeling that one of European football’s great powerhouses has been left for too long in the hands of inadequate old men and that the consequences are now being felt. In a country which has produced so many great coaches, however, there are no obvious candidate to overhaul the system as was done with great success in Germany, and is now being attempted in England. The Italian sports minister Luca Lotti said on Tuesday that addressing the World Cup qualifying failure was “a problem that involves everyone”. “It is a cultural issue,” he said, from how to teach young footballers how to play, to how parents behave on the touchline.” There has long been a concern over the falling quality of Italian players and although the country’s Under-21s reached the European championship semi-finals this summer, there has been a lack of enthusiasm about the quality of those breaking through. There are high hopes for the Juventus winger Federico Bernadeschi, 23, and Federico Chiesa, 20, another winger from Fiorentina, but otherwise there seems to be a worrying shortage. Jorginho, originally from Brazil, was Italy's best player on Monday night Credit: Getty images On the night, Italy’s best player was Jorginho, the naturalised Brazilian who had never played a competitive game for his new country before this match and had he not played would still be eligible to represent Brazil in Russia next summer. There is a consensus that numbers of Italian players have fallen and the most recent Uefa report put Serie A on 55.5 per cent non-native players, still some way behind the Premier League on 69.2 per cent foreign imports. That 55.5 per cent still puts Italy ahead of Germany, Spain and France, the other big five European leagues, and there are concerns that the pattern may also be repeating itself in the academies of the biggest clubs. There is no question that Ventura was a very poor choice and that the players wanted him out since September and the humbling 3-0 qualifying defeat to Spain, a side Italy had eliminated at Euro 2016 under Antonio Conte. The Chelsea manager had been expensive but effective for the FIGC, his wages paid in part by shirt sponsor Puma and the plan was that if Ventura was to be ousted by the summer there would have been another whip-round of the sponsors to put together a package for a big name. A poll on the Gazzetta dello Sport website on Tuesday found that 65 per cent of fans wanted Carlo Ancelotti, who is the obvious choice but who may have better options when the managerial musical chairs begins anew among the big clubs next summer. It was not hard to see the lack of faith in Ventura in Daniele De Rossi’s incredulous reaction to being told he was to warm-up on Tuesday night, angrily suggesting that Lorenzo Insigne come on instead.  Lorenzo Insigne was on the bench on Monday  Credit: Getty images The Napoli striker is regarded as the best player available to the national team ahead of Marco Verratti, currently injured, and yet Ventura could find no place for him in the side. He also did not attempt to bring back Mario Balotelli, back in form at Nice in Ligue Un, although that was thought to be at the insistence of senior players like Gianluigi Buffon, De Rossi and Andrea Barzagli, all of whom have said that they will now retire. The question for Italian football now is whether they stumble on or attempt a major infrastructure change in the style of Germany’s re-boot after Euro 2000. One school of thought is that the 2006 World Cup triumph, coming in the same year as the Calciopoli match-fixing scandal, allowed the Italian game to ignore cracks in the system that have ultimately resulted in this latest failure. There was more of an appetite for change before that victory and now it is too late for a place in Russia. The president of the Italian Olympic committee Giovanni Malago has said that in Tavecchio’s position he would quit. The very fact that Tavecchio did not immediately walk would suggest that vested interests are being placed ahead of the Italian football renaissance. “It’s time to reform football,” Malago has said, “and make the kind of decisions that were not made in the past.”

Giampiero Ventura was the wrong choice for Italy but further issues behind the scenes are preventing a renaissance

It tells you everything about the Italy manager Giampiero Ventura that the 69-year-old’s World Cup qualifying campaign in charge of the team had been so bad that, had his side beaten Sweden in the play-offs, there was still a chance he would be replaced before the finals next summer. As it was the old boy looked lost on the touchline as his side fizzled out in a 0-0 draw at San Siro, losing 1-0 on aggregate, the very antithesis of the capable, shrewd coach that Italy has exported to the world, and he did not turn up for his post-match press conference until well past midnight. As of Tuesday afternoon he had still failed to resign, assumed to be hanging on for what is a €600,000 compensation clause written into the second contract he has signed with the Italian football federation (FIGC). When Italy went out of the 2014 World Cup at the group stages, the resignation of coach Cesare Prandelli was immediate and so too was that of Giancarlo Abete, then president of the FIGC. It is the way they prefer it in times of national crisis although there has been no recent failure like this in Italy, an international force with four World Cups stars on the Azzurri shirt and a constant in tournaments, if rarely the great entertainers. Ventura was a poor choice but then when you look at the calibre of the man who selected him, the current FIGC president Carlo Tavecchio, then it is little surprise. Three years ago the 74-year-old was banned by Fifa and sanctioned by Uefa for a diatribe about the falling numbers of Italian players in Serie A in which he referred to a fictitious African player “who previously ate bananas and then suddenly became a first team player at Lazio”. He has also disparaged women, remarking how he previously regarded them as being “handicapped” when it came to sport. As of Tuesday afternoon, Tavecchio had also not resigned, although it would be fair to say that on his long list of personal shortcomings, appointing a manager who failed to get Italy to a World Cup finals for the first time in 60 years might not even make the top five. Carlo Tavecchio on the touchline at San Siro Credit: getty images There is a distinct feeling that one of European football’s great powerhouses has been left for too long in the hands of inadequate old men and that the consequences are now being felt. In a country which has produced so many great coaches, however, there are no obvious candidate to overhaul the system as was done with great success in Germany, and is now being attempted in England. The Italian sports minister Luca Lotti said on Tuesday that addressing the World Cup qualifying failure was “a problem that involves everyone”. “It is a cultural issue,” he said, from how to teach young footballers how to play, to how parents behave on the touchline.” There has long been a concern over the falling quality of Italian players and although the country’s Under-21s reached the European championship semi-finals this summer, there has been a lack of enthusiasm about the quality of those breaking through. There are high hopes for the Juventus winger Federico Bernadeschi, 23, and Federico Chiesa, 20, another winger from Fiorentina, but otherwise there seems to be a worrying shortage. Jorginho, originally from Brazil, was Italy's best player on Monday night Credit: Getty images On the night, Italy’s best player was Jorginho, the naturalised Brazilian who had never played a competitive game for his new country before this match and had he not played would still be eligible to represent Brazil in Russia next summer. There is a consensus that numbers of Italian players have fallen and the most recent Uefa report put Serie A on 55.5 per cent non-native players, still some way behind the Premier League on 69.2 per cent foreign imports. That 55.5 per cent still puts Italy ahead of Germany, Spain and France, the other big five European leagues, and there are concerns that the pattern may also be repeating itself in the academies of the biggest clubs. There is no question that Ventura was a very poor choice and that the players wanted him out since September and the humbling 3-0 qualifying defeat to Spain, a side Italy had eliminated at Euro 2016 under Antonio Conte. The Chelsea manager had been expensive but effective for the FIGC, his wages paid in part by shirt sponsor Puma and the plan was that if Ventura was to be ousted by the summer there would have been another whip-round of the sponsors to put together a package for a big name. A poll on the Gazzetta dello Sport website on Tuesday found that 65 per cent of fans wanted Carlo Ancelotti, who is the obvious choice but who may have better options when the managerial musical chairs begins anew among the big clubs next summer. It was not hard to see the lack of faith in Ventura in Daniele De Rossi’s incredulous reaction to being told he was to warm-up on Tuesday night, angrily suggesting that Lorenzo Insigne come on instead.  Lorenzo Insigne was on the bench on Monday  Credit: Getty images The Napoli striker is regarded as the best player available to the national team ahead of Marco Verratti, currently injured, and yet Ventura could find no place for him in the side. He also did not attempt to bring back Mario Balotelli, back in form at Nice in Ligue Un, although that was thought to be at the insistence of senior players like Gianluigi Buffon, De Rossi and Andrea Barzagli, all of whom have said that they will now retire. The question for Italian football now is whether they stumble on or attempt a major infrastructure change in the style of Germany’s re-boot after Euro 2000. One school of thought is that the 2006 World Cup triumph, coming in the same year as the Calciopoli match-fixing scandal, allowed the Italian game to ignore cracks in the system that have ultimately resulted in this latest failure. There was more of an appetite for change before that victory and now it is too late for a place in Russia. The president of the Italian Olympic committee Giovanni Malago has said that in Tavecchio’s position he would quit. The very fact that Tavecchio did not immediately walk would suggest that vested interests are being placed ahead of the Italian football renaissance. “It’s time to reform football,” Malago has said, “and make the kind of decisions that were not made in the past.”

Giampiero Ventura was the wrong choice for Italy but further issues behind the scenes are preventing a renaissance

It tells you everything about the Italy manager Giampiero Ventura that the 69-year-old’s World Cup qualifying campaign in charge of the team had been so bad that, had his side beaten Sweden in the play-offs, there was still a chance he would be replaced before the finals next summer. As it was the old boy looked lost on the touchline as his side fizzled out in a 0-0 draw at San Siro, losing 1-0 on aggregate, the very antithesis of the capable, shrewd coach that Italy has exported to the world, and he did not turn up for his post-match press conference until well past midnight. As of Tuesday afternoon he had still failed to resign, assumed to be hanging on for what is a €600,000 compensation clause written into the second contract he has signed with the Italian football federation (FIGC). When Italy went out of the 2014 World Cup at the group stages, the resignation of coach Cesare Prandelli was immediate and so too was that of Giancarlo Abete, then president of the FIGC. It is the way they prefer it in times of national crisis although there has been no recent failure like this in Italy, an international force with four World Cups stars on the Azzurri shirt and a constant in tournaments, if rarely the great entertainers. Ventura was a poor choice but then when you look at the calibre of the man who selected him, the current FIGC president Carlo Tavecchio, then it is little surprise. Three years ago the 74-year-old was banned by Fifa and sanctioned by Uefa for a diatribe about the falling numbers of Italian players in Serie A in which he referred to a fictitious African player “who previously ate bananas and then suddenly became a first team player at Lazio”. He has also disparaged women, remarking how he previously regarded them as being “handicapped” when it came to sport. As of Tuesday afternoon, Tavecchio had also not resigned, although it would be fair to say that on his long list of personal shortcomings, appointing a manager who failed to get Italy to a World Cup finals for the first time in 60 years might not even make the top five. Carlo Tavecchio on the touchline at San Siro Credit: getty images There is a distinct feeling that one of European football’s great powerhouses has been left for too long in the hands of inadequate old men and that the consequences are now being felt. In a country which has produced so many great coaches, however, there are no obvious candidate to overhaul the system as was done with great success in Germany, and is now being attempted in England. The Italian sports minister Luca Lotti said on Tuesday that addressing the World Cup qualifying failure was “a problem that involves everyone”. “It is a cultural issue,” he said, from how to teach young footballers how to play, to how parents behave on the touchline.” There has long been a concern over the falling quality of Italian players and although the country’s Under-21s reached the European championship semi-finals this summer, there has been a lack of enthusiasm about the quality of those breaking through. There are high hopes for the Juventus winger Federico Bernadeschi, 23, and Federico Chiesa, 20, another winger from Fiorentina, but otherwise there seems to be a worrying shortage. Jorginho, originally from Brazil, was Italy's best player on Monday night Credit: Getty images On the night, Italy’s best player was Jorginho, the naturalised Brazilian who had never played a competitive game for his new country before this match and had he not played would still be eligible to represent Brazil in Russia next summer. There is a consensus that numbers of Italian players have fallen and the most recent Uefa report put Serie A on 55.5 per cent non-native players, still some way behind the Premier League on 69.2 per cent foreign imports. That 55.5 per cent still puts Italy ahead of Germany, Spain and France, the other big five European leagues, and there are concerns that the pattern may also be repeating itself in the academies of the biggest clubs. There is no question that Ventura was a very poor choice and that the players wanted him out since September and the humbling 3-0 qualifying defeat to Spain, a side Italy had eliminated at Euro 2016 under Antonio Conte. The Chelsea manager had been expensive but effective for the FIGC, his wages paid in part by shirt sponsor Puma and the plan was that if Ventura was to be ousted by the summer there would have been another whip-round of the sponsors to put together a package for a big name. A poll on the Gazzetta dello Sport website on Tuesday found that 65 per cent of fans wanted Carlo Ancelotti, who is the obvious choice but who may have better options when the managerial musical chairs begins anew among the big clubs next summer. It was not hard to see the lack of faith in Ventura in Daniele De Rossi’s incredulous reaction to being told he was to warm-up on Tuesday night, angrily suggesting that Lorenzo Insigne come on instead.  Lorenzo Insigne was on the bench on Monday  Credit: Getty images The Napoli striker is regarded as the best player available to the national team ahead of Marco Verratti, currently injured, and yet Ventura could find no place for him in the side. He also did not attempt to bring back Mario Balotelli, back in form at Nice in Ligue Un, although that was thought to be at the insistence of senior players like Gianluigi Buffon, De Rossi and Andrea Barzagli, all of whom have said that they will now retire. The question for Italian football now is whether they stumble on or attempt a major infrastructure change in the style of Germany’s re-boot after Euro 2000. One school of thought is that the 2006 World Cup triumph, coming in the same year as the Calciopoli match-fixing scandal, allowed the Italian game to ignore cracks in the system that have ultimately resulted in this latest failure. There was more of an appetite for change before that victory and now it is too late for a place in Russia. The president of the Italian Olympic committee Giovanni Malago has said that in Tavecchio’s position he would quit. The very fact that Tavecchio did not immediately walk would suggest that vested interests are being placed ahead of the Italian football renaissance. “It’s time to reform football,” Malago has said, “and make the kind of decisions that were not made in the past.”

Giampiero Ventura was the wrong choice for Italy but further issues behind the scenes are preventing a renaissance

It tells you everything about the Italy manager Giampiero Ventura that the 69-year-old’s World Cup qualifying campaign in charge of the team had been so bad that, had his side beaten Sweden in the play-offs, there was still a chance he would be replaced before the finals next summer. As it was the old boy looked lost on the touchline as his side fizzled out in a 0-0 draw at San Siro, losing 1-0 on aggregate, the very antithesis of the capable, shrewd coach that Italy has exported to the world, and he did not turn up for his post-match press conference until well past midnight. As of Tuesday afternoon he had still failed to resign, assumed to be hanging on for what is a €600,000 compensation clause written into the second contract he has signed with the Italian football federation (FIGC). When Italy went out of the 2014 World Cup at the group stages, the resignation of coach Cesare Prandelli was immediate and so too was that of Giancarlo Abete, then president of the FIGC. It is the way they prefer it in times of national crisis although there has been no recent failure like this in Italy, an international force with four World Cups stars on the Azzurri shirt and a constant in tournaments, if rarely the great entertainers. Ventura was a poor choice but then when you look at the calibre of the man who selected him, the current FIGC president Carlo Tavecchio, then it is little surprise. Three years ago the 74-year-old was banned by Fifa and sanctioned by Uefa for a diatribe about the falling numbers of Italian players in Serie A in which he referred to a fictitious African player “who previously ate bananas and then suddenly became a first team player at Lazio”. He has also disparaged women, remarking how he previously regarded them as being “handicapped” when it came to sport. As of Tuesday afternoon, Tavecchio had also not resigned, although it would be fair to say that on his long list of personal shortcomings, appointing a manager who failed to get Italy to a World Cup finals for the first time in 60 years might not even make the top five. Carlo Tavecchio on the touchline at San Siro Credit: getty images There is a distinct feeling that one of European football’s great powerhouses has been left for too long in the hands of inadequate old men and that the consequences are now being felt. In a country which has produced so many great coaches, however, there are no obvious candidate to overhaul the system as was done with great success in Germany, and is now being attempted in England. The Italian sports minister Luca Lotti said on Tuesday that addressing the World Cup qualifying failure was “a problem that involves everyone”. “It is a cultural issue,” he said, from how to teach young footballers how to play, to how parents behave on the touchline.” There has long been a concern over the falling quality of Italian players and although the country’s Under-21s reached the European championship semi-finals this summer, there has been a lack of enthusiasm about the quality of those breaking through. There are high hopes for the Juventus winger Federico Bernadeschi, 23, and Federico Chiesa, 20, another winger from Fiorentina, but otherwise there seems to be a worrying shortage. Jorginho, originally from Brazil, was Italy's best player on Monday night Credit: Getty images On the night, Italy’s best player was Jorginho, the naturalised Brazilian who had never played a competitive game for his new country before this match and had he not played would still be eligible to represent Brazil in Russia next summer. There is a consensus that numbers of Italian players have fallen and the most recent Uefa report put Serie A on 55.5 per cent non-native players, still some way behind the Premier League on 69.2 per cent foreign imports. That 55.5 per cent still puts Italy ahead of Germany, Spain and France, the other big five European leagues, and there are concerns that the pattern may also be repeating itself in the academies of the biggest clubs. There is no question that Ventura was a very poor choice and that the players wanted him out since September and the humbling 3-0 qualifying defeat to Spain, a side Italy had eliminated at Euro 2016 under Antonio Conte. The Chelsea manager had been expensive but effective for the FIGC, his wages paid in part by shirt sponsor Puma and the plan was that if Ventura was to be ousted by the summer there would have been another whip-round of the sponsors to put together a package for a big name. A poll on the Gazzetta dello Sport website on Tuesday found that 65 per cent of fans wanted Carlo Ancelotti, who is the obvious choice but who may have better options when the managerial musical chairs begins anew among the big clubs next summer. It was not hard to see the lack of faith in Ventura in Daniele De Rossi’s incredulous reaction to being told he was to warm-up on Tuesday night, angrily suggesting that Lorenzo Insigne come on instead.  Lorenzo Insigne was on the bench on Monday  Credit: Getty images The Napoli striker is regarded as the best player available to the national team ahead of Marco Verratti, currently injured, and yet Ventura could find no place for him in the side. He also did not attempt to bring back Mario Balotelli, back in form at Nice in Ligue Un, although that was thought to be at the insistence of senior players like Gianluigi Buffon, De Rossi and Andrea Barzagli, all of whom have said that they will now retire. The question for Italian football now is whether they stumble on or attempt a major infrastructure change in the style of Germany’s re-boot after Euro 2000. One school of thought is that the 2006 World Cup triumph, coming in the same year as the Calciopoli match-fixing scandal, allowed the Italian game to ignore cracks in the system that have ultimately resulted in this latest failure. There was more of an appetite for change before that victory and now it is too late for a place in Russia. The president of the Italian Olympic committee Giovanni Malago has said that in Tavecchio’s position he would quit. The very fact that Tavecchio did not immediately walk would suggest that vested interests are being placed ahead of the Italian football renaissance. “It’s time to reform football,” Malago has said, “and make the kind of decisions that were not made in the past.”

Higuain si è ripreso la Juventus, il fratello: "La svolta? La traversa con la Lazio"

Il fratello di Gonzalo Higuain, Nicolas, non ha dubbi su quale sia stata la svolta per il 'Pipita': "Quella traversa clamorosa contro la Lazio".

El Atlético estaría en la carrera por De Vrij

Según informa el diario 'La Repubblica', el conjunto rojiblanco habría mostrado interés por el defensa de la Lazio, junto a Liverpool y Juventus

Ranking UEFA: Juventus, Lazio, Napoli e Roma stabili, salgono Atalanta e Milan

Nell'ultimo Ranking UEFA nessuna variazione per Juventus (5ª), Lazio (38ª), Napoli (12°) e Roma (27ª), guadagnano posti Atalanta (96ª) e Milan (50°).

Serie A: Neapel patzt, Juve entgeht Blamage knapp

Auch am 12. Spieltag der Serie A bleibt Neapel ungeschlagen, kommt bei Chievo Verona aber nur zu einem Remis. Juventus Turin müht sich gegen das punktlose Schlusslicht Benevento, durch den Dreier verkürzt sich der Rückstand auf Napoli auf einen Zähler. Das Heimspiel von Lazio wurde wegen Regens abgesagt. Hier gibt es alle Infos zu den Begegnungen, der Tabelle, den Livestreams und den Livetickern.

Juventus sai atrás, mas vence o Benevento; Lazio tem jogo adiado

Adversários da Velha Senhora são os últimos colocados do Campeonato Italiano, com 12 derrotas em 12 partidas

Juventus sai atrás, mas vence o Benevento; Lazio tem jogo adiado

Adversários da Velha Senhora são os últimos colocados do Campeonato Italiano, com 12 derrotas em 12 partidas

Inzaghi punge il Napoli: "Infortunio Ghoulam? Contro di loro tre in 45 minuti"

Simone Inzaghi, al termine di Lazio-Nizza, punge il Napoli e Sarri: "Juventus la migliore in Italia, contro gli azzurri tre infortuni in 45 minuti".

Where does Spurs's Real Madrid win rank in English football's best European performances?

Though some hard-liners will argue Tottenham Hotspur have 'achieved nothing' until they hold a trophy aloft, football is also about memorable moments and their victory over Real Madrid was certainly one of those. A pinch-yourself night for any Spurs fan at Wembley, their forensic deconstruction of the Champions League holders was a perfect encapsulation of their progress under Mauricio Pochettino. But where does it stand among other landmark performances by English teams in European competition?  NB. The list is based on the quality of the performances, not the glory of the occasion - or else this would be a list of all the European finals English teams have won.  10. Lazio 0 Leeds United 1, Champions League group stage, 2000  There have been some impressive performances in Rome by English teams, not least Liverpool beating Roma on penalties in the 1984 European Cup final. However, the Lazio team Leeds defeated now reads as a roll-call of some of Europe's best, and they were Serie A champions. Alan Smith's goal was enough for the three points in a hostile atmosphere against the likes of Alessandro Nesta, Diego Simeone, Juan Sebastian Veron, Attilio Lombard, Pavel Nedved and Hernan Crespo. Leeds would reach the semi-finals that season, before their gradual descent from the never-never land began amid financial turmoil.  9. Fulham 4 Juventus 1, Uefa Cup last-16, 2010  A performance that ticks all of the boxes for a great European showing: small, romantic club against Italian powerhouse, the dreadful start followed by unlikely comeback and Bobby Zamora throwing his weight around. Fulham did not go on to win the tournament, losing the final to Atletico Madrid. But try telling Fulham fans that makes this win any less significant.  Trailing 2-1 after the first leg, things were looking bleak for Roy Hodgson's side when David Trezeguet put the Old Lady in front inside two minutes at Craven Cottage. In a way reminiscent of Middlesbrough's comeback win against Steaua Bucharest in 2008, Fulham kept throwing bodies forward and duly found holes in the Juventus defence. Zamora levelled, before Fabio Cannavro's sending off swung the tie in their favour. Zoltan Gera scored twice before Clint Dempsey scored the winner with a delicious chip.  Bobby Zamora lines up his first goal 8. Koln 0 Nottingham Forest 1, European Cup semi-final, 1979 No collection of English football's finest European performances would be complete without reference to Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest. Having knocked out Liverpool on their way to the last-four, Forest appeared done for after a helter-skelter first leg against Koln finished 3-3 at the City ground. "The general consensus of the so-called experts, the sportswriters and the television pundits, was that we were out of the competition already," Clough reflected in his autobiography. "If I'd listened to that lot I wouldn't have bothered taking the team to Germany for the return leg."  But take a team to Germany he did, and Forest produced a calm and professional performance to win 1-0 courtesy of an Ian Bowyer winning goal. They beat Malmo in the final, but their victory in Germany was the toughest test of their European Cup run.  7. Liverpool 4 Real Madrid 0, Champions League last-16, 2009  One of many exceptional European displays by Liverpool in this period, who saw off Chelsea, Arsenal, Inter, Barcelona and Juventus over two legs between 2005 and 2009 in the Champions League. However, as Tottenham fans will tell you, there is an intangible glamour to toppling Real Madrid. Liverpool had the cushion of a 1-0 away win to take to Anfield, but the ease with which they dispatched their illustrious opponents was no less impressive.  Overwhelming Real with a frenetic pace of play, Fernando Torres tormented his former rivals with a dynamic centre forward's performance. He opened the scoring before Steven Gerrard scored twice and Andrea Dossena added to their misery. Los Blancos responded to their humiliation by signing Cristiano Ronaldo for a world record fee that summer.  Steven Gerrard dispatches as Arjen Robben looks on Credit: AFP 6. Bayern Munich 1 Norwich City 2, Uefa Cup second-round, 1993  Ah, the good old days when the Uefa Cup was a proper competition that did not mess around with money-spinning, soporific, group stages. Norwich were regular early-season pacesetters in the 'Premiership's' formative years, but this is the result they still speak about at the north end of the A11. The first - and only - English club to win at Bayern's former home the Olympic Stadium, Norwich secured the monumental result via a Jeremy Goss volley and Mark Bowen header, and a 1-1 draw in the return leg at Carrow Road saw them through.  Possibly even better than the result though, was Norwich's psychedelic patterned kit that Bayern said they were 'still haunted' by years later. When it was launched before the start of the season fans likened it to a ‘shower curtain’, a ‘90’s low budget travel agent uniform’ and ‘Stagecoach seats’.  5. Spurs 3 Real Madrid 1, Champions League group stage, 2017 The night Tottenham finally threw off the inferiority complex that has lingered despite their rise under Pochettino. Spurs took full advantage of Real's perfunctory attempts to work hard and defend, with Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli scarcely able to believe the acres of green Wembley turf that surrounded them.  In truth, had Spurs executed their passes in the final-third with greater accuracy, this could have been a real pasting - but you take your 3-1 wins over Real Madrid however you can. Alli scored the first, turning home the impressive Kieran Trippier's cross, before his second and a Christian Eriksen strike sealed the game. Group stage matches can fade from view by the time they knockout stages come around, but Spurs fans should savour Wednesday's win for it's own sake. Even if Tottenham go out in the next round, who really cares? It will not make their famous victory any less 'meaningful'.  The 100 greatest Champions League moments 4. Benfica 1 Manchester United 5, European Cup quarter-final, 1966 Best's goal in the 1968 final against the same opponents at Wembley is imprinted on the brain, but it was Best's performance in this resounding Lisbon victory that won him admirers across the continent. United led 3-2 from the first leg at Old Trafford, but Best dazzled as they put the tie beyond reach with two goals and an assist inside the first 15 minutes. "A hurricane passed through the Luz that night,” Benfica’s Antonio Simoes said, “and his name was George Best.” The Portuguese paper Bola described famously described Best as ‘El Beatle’. 3. Inter Milan 1 Arsenal 5, Champions League, group stage, 2003 Things were going swimmingly for Arsenal domestically, but as tended to be the case, Arsene Wenger's side saved their worst for European competition. They were beaten 3-0 at Highbury by Inter in the first group match, followed that a 0-0 draw at Locomotiv Moscow and a calamitous 2-1 defeat away to Dynamo Kiev. One point from nine then, and were it not for a late Ashley Cole winner in the return game against Kiev this tie in Milan would have been academic.  Without Gilberto Silva and an injured Patrick Vieira, Ray Parlour captained Arsenal and started alongside Edu in central midfield. Arsenal started confidently, Theirry Henry giving them the lead after some trademark combination play with Cole and Robert Pires but Christian Vieri levelled with a fluky goal before half-time. Unperturbed, Arsenal kept playing their game and ran away with it in the second half. Thierry Henry celebrates as Ray Parlour eyes up a post-match Cobra Credit: Getty Images Freddie Ljungberg, Edu and Pires deserved honourable mentions for their goals, but it was Henry's second and Arsenal's third that was the image of the game. Arsenal cleared an Inter corner and set off on the counter-attack through the Frenchman, who drove Javier Zanetti back into his own penalty area. The Inter legend did exactly what the textbook says, showing Henry the outside and onto his 'weaker' left foot. He could only watch helplessly as Henry drilled a a left-foot shoot into the far corner.  A goal served best with Clive Tyldesley's delightful line: "Steve Bruce said at the weekend that he is the best player in the world...ANYBODY ARGUING?" 2. Chelsea 4 Barcelona 2, Champions League last-16, 2005  Those wishing to argue that Jose Mourinho's teams can play exciting football always marshall this game at Stamford Bridge to support their case. Yes, Chelsea got bodies behind the ball and defended in numbers, but when possession was regained they scythed through Barcelona with an exhibition of counter-attacking football. The word 'transitions' was not in wide usage outside of Mourinho's famous dossiers, but this was the perfect example of how to utilise them to your advantage.  Chelsea were 3-0 up inside 20 minutes at Stamford Bridge, thanks to Eidur Gudjohnsen, Frank Lampard and Damien Duff - with the Irish winger's goal the pick of the lot. That put Chelsea 4-2 up on aggregate, before Barcelona fought back to 4-4 through a Ronaldinho penalty and a sumptuous toe-poke from outside the penalty area. John Terry grabbed the winner to settle a tempestuous contest in which Jose Mourinho and Frank Rijkaard clashed on the sidelines.  Jose Mourinho celebrates in his famous overcoat Credit: Getty Images 1. Juventus 2 Manchester United 3, Champions League, semi-final, 1999 Nothing will beat 'that night in Barcelona' for drama, but Man Utd's gladiatorial display in Turin was the best performance of their triumphant Champions League run in 1999. After a 1-1 draw in the first leg at Old Trafford, two early goals by Filipo Inzaghi - the striker Sir Alex Ferguson once said was 'born offside' - left United's treble ambitions in jeopardy.  That was until Roy Keane intervened. The skipper produced a seminal performance and sparked the comeback with a headed goal from a David Beckham corner. Dwight Yorke scored another header to level before the interval, and progress to the final was sealed by Andy Cole late-on. The night however, will always be remembered as Keane's finest hour who played through the disappointment of a yellow card that ruled him out of the final. No Gascoigne-like tears from him. 

Where does Spurs's Real Madrid win rank in English football's best European performances?

Though some hard-liners will argue Tottenham Hotspur have 'achieved nothing' until they hold a trophy aloft, football is also about memorable moments and their victory over Real Madrid was certainly one of those. A pinch-yourself night for any Spurs fan at Wembley, their forensic deconstruction of the Champions League holders was a perfect encapsulation of their progress under Mauricio Pochettino. But where does it stand among other landmark performances by English teams in European competition?  NB. The list is based on the quality of the performances, not the glory of the occasion - or else this would be a list of all the European finals English teams have won.  10. Lazio 0 Leeds United 1, Champions League group stage, 2000  There have been some impressive performances in Rome by English teams, not least Liverpool beating Roma on penalties in the 1984 European Cup final. However, the Lazio team Leeds defeated now reads as a roll-call of some of Europe's best, and they were Serie A champions. Alan Smith's goal was enough for the three points in a hostile atmosphere against the likes of Alessandro Nesta, Diego Simeone, Juan Sebastian Veron, Attilio Lombard, Pavel Nedved and Hernan Crespo. Leeds would reach the semi-finals that season, before their gradual descent from the never-never land began amid financial turmoil.  9. Fulham 4 Juventus 1, Uefa Cup last-16, 2010  A performance that ticks all of the boxes for a great European showing: small, romantic club against Italian powerhouse, the dreadful start followed by unlikely comeback and Bobby Zamora throwing his weight around. Fulham did not go on to win the tournament, losing the final to Atletico Madrid. But try telling Fulham fans that makes this win any less significant.  Trailing 2-1 after the first leg, things were looking bleak for Roy Hodgson's side when David Trezeguet put the Old Lady in front inside two minutes at Craven Cottage. In a way reminiscent of Middlesbrough's comeback win against Steaua Bucharest in 2008, Fulham kept throwing bodies forward and duly found holes in the Juventus defence. Zamora levelled, before Fabio Cannavro's sending off swung the tie in their favour. Zoltan Gera scored twice before Clint Dempsey scored the winner with a delicious chip.  Bobby Zamora lines up his first goal 8. Koln 0 Nottingham Forest 1, European Cup semi-final, 1979 No collection of English football's finest European performances would be complete without reference to Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest. Having knocked out Liverpool on their way to the last-four, Forest appeared done for after a helter-skelter first leg against Koln finished 3-3 at the City ground. "The general consensus of the so-called experts, the sportswriters and the television pundits, was that we were out of the competition already," Clough reflected in his autobiography. "If I'd listened to that lot I wouldn't have bothered taking the team to Germany for the return leg."  But take a team to Germany he did, and Forest produced a calm and professional performance to win 1-0 courtesy of an Ian Bowyer winning goal. They beat Malmo in the final, but their victory in Germany was the toughest test of their European Cup run.  7. Liverpool 4 Real Madrid 0, Champions League last-16, 2009  One of many exceptional European displays by Liverpool in this period, who saw off Chelsea, Arsenal, Inter, Barcelona and Juventus over two legs between 2005 and 2009 in the Champions League. However, as Tottenham fans will tell you, there is an intangible glamour to toppling Real Madrid. Liverpool had the cushion of a 1-0 away win to take to Anfield, but the ease with which they dispatched their illustrious opponents was no less impressive.  Overwhelming Real with a frenetic pace of play, Fernando Torres tormented his former rivals with a dynamic centre forward's performance. He opened the scoring before Steven Gerrard scored twice and Andrea Dossena added to their misery. Los Blancos responded to their humiliation by signing Cristiano Ronaldo for a world record fee that summer.  Steven Gerrard dispatches as Arjen Robben looks on Credit: AFP 6. Bayern Munich 1 Norwich City 2, Uefa Cup second-round, 1993  Ah, the good old days when the Uefa Cup was a proper competition that did not mess around with money-spinning, soporific, group stages. Norwich were regular early-season pacesetters in the 'Premiership's' formative years, but this is the result they still speak about at the north end of the A11. The first - and only - English club to win at Bayern's former home the Olympic Stadium, Norwich secured the monumental result via a Jeremy Goss volley and Mark Bowen header, and a 1-1 draw in the return leg at Carrow Road saw them through.  Possibly even better than the result though, was Norwich's psychedelic patterned kit that Bayern said they were 'still haunted' by years later. When it was launched before the start of the season fans likened it to a ‘shower curtain’, a ‘90’s low budget travel agent uniform’ and ‘Stagecoach seats’.  5. Spurs 3 Real Madrid 1, Champions League group stage, 2017 The night Tottenham finally threw off the inferiority complex that has lingered despite their rise under Pochettino. Spurs took full advantage of Real's perfunctory attempts to work hard and defend, with Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli scarcely able to believe the acres of green Wembley turf that surrounded them.  In truth, had Spurs executed their passes in the final-third with greater accuracy, this could have been a real pasting - but you take your 3-1 wins over Real Madrid however you can. Alli scored the first, turning home the impressive Kieran Trippier's cross, before his second and a Christian Eriksen strike sealed the game. Group stage matches can fade from view by the time they knockout stages come around, but Spurs fans should savour Wednesday's win for it's own sake. Even if Tottenham go out in the next round, who really cares? It will not make their famous victory any less 'meaningful'.  The 100 greatest Champions League moments 4. Benfica 1 Manchester United 5, European Cup quarter-final, 1966 Best's goal in the 1968 final against the same opponents at Wembley is imprinted on the brain, but it was Best's performance in this resounding Lisbon victory that won him admirers across the continent. United led 3-2 from the first leg at Old Trafford, but Best dazzled as they put the tie beyond reach with two goals and an assist inside the first 15 minutes. "A hurricane passed through the Luz that night,” Benfica’s Antonio Simoes said, “and his name was George Best.” The Portuguese paper Bola described famously described Best as ‘El Beatle’. 3. Inter Milan 1 Arsenal 5, Champions League, group stage, 2003 Things were going swimmingly for Arsenal domestically, but as tended to be the case, Arsene Wenger's side saved their worst for European competition. They were beaten 3-0 at Highbury by Inter in the first group match, followed that a 0-0 draw at Locomotiv Moscow and a calamitous 2-1 defeat away to Dynamo Kiev. One point from nine then, and were it not for a late Ashley Cole winner in the return game against Kiev this tie in Milan would have been academic.  Without Gilberto Silva and an injured Patrick Vieira, Ray Parlour captained Arsenal and started alongside Edu in central midfield. Arsenal started confidently, Theirry Henry giving them the lead after some trademark combination play with Cole and Robert Pires but Christian Vieri levelled with a fluky goal before half-time. Unperturbed, Arsenal kept playing their game and ran away with it in the second half. Thierry Henry celebrates as Ray Parlour eyes up a post-match Cobra Credit: Getty Images Freddie Ljungberg, Edu and Pires deserved honourable mentions for their goals, but it was Henry's second and Arsenal's third that was the image of the game. Arsenal cleared an Inter corner and set off on the counter-attack through the Frenchman, who drove Javier Zanetti back into his own penalty area. The Inter legend did exactly what the textbook says, showing Henry the outside and onto his 'weaker' left foot. He could only watch helplessly as Henry drilled a a left-foot shoot into the far corner.  A goal served best with Clive Tyldesley's delightful line: "Steve Bruce said at the weekend that he is the best player in the world...ANYBODY ARGUING?" 2. Chelsea 4 Barcelona 2, Champions League last-16, 2005  Those wishing to argue that Jose Mourinho's teams can play exciting football always marshall this game at Stamford Bridge to support their case. Yes, Chelsea got bodies behind the ball and defended in numbers, but when possession was regained they scythed through Barcelona with an exhibition of counter-attacking football. The word 'transitions' was not in wide usage outside of Mourinho's famous dossiers, but this was the perfect example of how to utilise them to your advantage.  Chelsea were 3-0 up inside 20 minutes at Stamford Bridge, thanks to Eidur Gudjohnsen, Frank Lampard and Damien Duff - with the Irish winger's goal the pick of the lot. That put Chelsea 4-2 up on aggregate, before Barcelona fought back to 4-4 through a Ronaldinho penalty and a sumptuous toe-poke from outside the penalty area. John Terry grabbed the winner to settle a tempestuous contest in which Jose Mourinho and Frank Rijkaard clashed on the sidelines.  Jose Mourinho celebrates in his famous overcoat Credit: Getty Images 1. Juventus 2 Manchester United 3, Champions League, semi-final, 1999 Nothing will beat 'that night in Barcelona' for drama, but Man Utd's gladiatorial display in Turin was the best performance of their triumphant Champions League run in 1999. After a 1-1 draw in the first leg at Old Trafford, two early goals by Filipo Inzaghi - the striker Sir Alex Ferguson once said was 'born offside' - left United's treble ambitions in jeopardy.  That was until Roy Keane intervened. The skipper produced a seminal performance and sparked the comeback with a headed goal from a David Beckham corner. Dwight Yorke scored another header to level before the interval, and progress to the final was sealed by Andy Cole late-on. The night however, will always be remembered as Keane's finest hour who played through the disappointment of a yellow card that ruled him out of the final. No Gascoigne-like tears from him. 

Where does Spurs's Real Madrid win rank in English football's best European performances?

Though some hard-liners will argue Tottenham Hotspur have 'achieved nothing' until they hold a trophy aloft, football is also about memorable moments and their victory over Real Madrid was certainly one of those. A pinch-yourself night for any Spurs fan at Wembley, their forensic deconstruction of the Champions League holders was a perfect encapsulation of their progress under Mauricio Pochettino. But where does it stand among other landmark performances by English teams in European competition?  NB. The list is based on the quality of the performances, not the glory of the occasion - or else this would be a list of all the European finals English teams have won.  10. Lazio 0 Leeds United 1, Champions League group stage, 2000  There have been some impressive performances in Rome by English teams, not least Liverpool beating Roma on penalties in the 1984 European Cup final. However, the Lazio team Leeds defeated now reads as a roll-call of some of Europe's best, and they were Serie A champions. Alan Smith's goal was enough for the three points in a hostile atmosphere against the likes of Alessandro Nesta, Diego Simeone, Juan Sebastian Veron, Attilio Lombard, Pavel Nedved and Hernan Crespo. Leeds would reach the semi-finals that season, before their gradual descent from the never-never land began amid financial turmoil.  9. Fulham 4 Juventus 1, Uefa Cup last-16, 2010  A performance that ticks all of the boxes for a great European showing: small, romantic club against Italian powerhouse, the dreadful start followed by unlikely comeback and Bobby Zamora throwing his weight around. Fulham did not go on to win the tournament, losing the final to Atletico Madrid. But try telling Fulham fans that makes this win any less significant.  Trailing 2-1 after the first leg, things were looking bleak for Roy Hodgson's side when David Trezeguet put the Old Lady in front inside two minutes at Craven Cottage. In a way reminiscent of Middlesbrough's comeback win against Steaua Bucharest in 2008, Fulham kept throwing bodies forward and duly found holes in the Juventus defence. Zamora levelled, before Fabio Cannavro's sending off swung the tie in their favour. Zoltan Gera scored twice before Clint Dempsey scored the winner with a delicious chip.  Bobby Zamora lines up his first goal 8. Koln 0 Nottingham Forest 1, European Cup semi-final, 1979 No collection of English football's finest European performances would be complete without reference to Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest. Having knocked out Liverpool on their way to the last-four, Forest appeared done for after a helter-skelter first leg against Koln finished 3-3 at the City ground. "The general consensus of the so-called experts, the sportswriters and the television pundits, was that we were out of the competition already," Clough reflected in his autobiography. "If I'd listened to that lot I wouldn't have bothered taking the team to Germany for the return leg."  But take a team to Germany he did, and Forest produced a calm and professional performance to win 1-0 courtesy of an Ian Bowyer winning goal. They beat Malmo in the final, but their victory in Germany was the toughest test of their European Cup run.  7. Liverpool 4 Real Madrid 0, Champions League last-16, 2009  One of many exceptional European displays by Liverpool in this period, who saw off Chelsea, Arsenal, Inter, Barcelona and Juventus over two legs between 2005 and 2009 in the Champions League. However, as Tottenham fans will tell you, there is an intangible glamour to toppling Real Madrid. Liverpool had the cushion of a 1-0 away win to take to Anfield, but the ease with which they dispatched their illustrious opponents was no less impressive.  Overwhelming Real with a frenetic pace of play, Fernando Torres tormented his former rivals with a dynamic centre forward's performance. He opened the scoring before Steven Gerrard scored twice and Andrea Dossena added to their misery. Los Blancos responded to their humiliation by signing Cristiano Ronaldo for a world record fee that summer.  Steven Gerrard dispatches as Arjen Robben looks on Credit: AFP 6. Bayern Munich 1 Norwich City 2, Uefa Cup second-round, 1993  Ah, the good old days when the Uefa Cup was a proper competition that did not mess around with money-spinning, soporific, group stages. Norwich were regular early-season pacesetters in the 'Premiership's' formative years, but this is the result they still speak about at the north end of the A11. The first - and only - English club to win at Bayern's former home the Olympic Stadium, Norwich secured the monumental result via a Jeremy Goss volley and Mark Bowen header, and a 1-1 draw in the return leg at Carrow Road saw them through.  Possibly even better than the result though, was Norwich's psychedelic patterned kit that Bayern said they were 'still haunted' by years later. When it was launched before the start of the season fans likened it to a ‘shower curtain’, a ‘90’s low budget travel agent uniform’ and ‘Stagecoach seats’.  5. Spurs 3 Real Madrid 1, Champions League group stage, 2017 The night Tottenham finally threw off the inferiority complex that has lingered despite their rise under Pochettino. Spurs took full advantage of Real's perfunctory attempts to work hard and defend, with Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli scarcely able to believe the acres of green Wembley turf that surrounded them.  In truth, had Spurs executed their passes in the final-third with greater accuracy, this could have been a real pasting - but you take your 3-1 wins over Real Madrid however you can. Alli scored the first, turning home the impressive Kieran Trippier's cross, before his second and a Christian Eriksen strike sealed the game. Group stage matches can fade from view by the time they knockout stages come around, but Spurs fans should savour Wednesday's win for it's own sake. Even if Tottenham go out in the next round, who really cares? It will not make their famous victory any less 'meaningful'.  The 100 greatest Champions League moments 4. Benfica 1 Manchester United 5, European Cup quarter-final, 1966 Best's goal in the 1968 final against the same opponents at Wembley is imprinted on the brain, but it was Best's performance in this resounding Lisbon victory that won him admirers across the continent. United led 3-2 from the first leg at Old Trafford, but Best dazzled as they put the tie beyond reach with two goals and an assist inside the first 15 minutes. "A hurricane passed through the Luz that night,” Benfica’s Antonio Simoes said, “and his name was George Best.” The Portuguese paper Bola described famously described Best as ‘El Beatle’. 3. Inter Milan 1 Arsenal 5, Champions League, group stage, 2003 Things were going swimmingly for Arsenal domestically, but as tended to be the case, Arsene Wenger's side saved their worst for European competition. They were beaten 3-0 at Highbury by Inter in the first group match, followed that a 0-0 draw at Locomotiv Moscow and a calamitous 2-1 defeat away to Dynamo Kiev. One point from nine then, and were it not for a late Ashley Cole winner in the return game against Kiev this tie in Milan would have been academic.  Without Gilberto Silva and an injured Patrick Vieira, Ray Parlour captained Arsenal and started alongside Edu in central midfield. Arsenal started confidently, Theirry Henry giving them the lead after some trademark combination play with Cole and Robert Pires but Christian Vieri levelled with a fluky goal before half-time. Unperturbed, Arsenal kept playing their game and ran away with it in the second half. Thierry Henry celebrates as Ray Parlour eyes up a post-match Cobra Credit: Getty Images Freddie Ljungberg, Edu and Pires deserved honourable mentions for their goals, but it was Henry's second and Arsenal's third that was the image of the game. Arsenal cleared an Inter corner and set off on the counter-attack through the Frenchman, who drove Javier Zanetti back into his own penalty area. The Inter legend did exactly what the textbook says, showing Henry the outside and onto his 'weaker' left foot. He could only watch helplessly as Henry drilled a a left-foot shoot into the far corner.  A goal served best with Clive Tyldesley's delightful line: "Steve Bruce said at the weekend that he is the best player in the world...ANYBODY ARGUING?" 2. Chelsea 4 Barcelona 2, Champions League last-16, 2005  Those wishing to argue that Jose Mourinho's teams can play exciting football always marshall this game at Stamford Bridge to support their case. Yes, Chelsea got bodies behind the ball and defended in numbers, but when possession was regained they scythed through Barcelona with an exhibition of counter-attacking football. The word 'transitions' was not in wide usage outside of Mourinho's famous dossiers, but this was the perfect example of how to utilise them to your advantage.  Chelsea were 3-0 up inside 20 minutes at Stamford Bridge, thanks to Eidur Gudjohnsen, Frank Lampard and Damien Duff - with the Irish winger's goal the pick of the lot. That put Chelsea 4-2 up on aggregate, before Barcelona fought back to 4-4 through a Ronaldinho penalty and a sumptuous toe-poke from outside the penalty area. John Terry grabbed the winner to settle a tempestuous contest in which Jose Mourinho and Frank Rijkaard clashed on the sidelines.  Jose Mourinho celebrates in his famous overcoat Credit: Getty Images 1. Juventus 2 Manchester United 3, Champions League, semi-final, 1999 Nothing will beat 'that night in Barcelona' for drama, but Man Utd's gladiatorial display in Turin was the best performance of their triumphant Champions League run in 1999. After a 1-1 draw in the first leg at Old Trafford, two early goals by Filipo Inzaghi - the striker Sir Alex Ferguson once said was 'born offside' - left United's treble ambitions in jeopardy.  That was until Roy Keane intervened. The skipper produced a seminal performance and sparked the comeback with a headed goal from a David Beckham corner. Dwight Yorke scored another header to level before the interval, and progress to the final was sealed by Andy Cole late-on. The night however, will always be remembered as Keane's finest hour who played through the disappointment of a yellow card that ruled him out of the final. No Gascoigne-like tears from him. 

Where does Spurs's Real Madrid win rank in English football's best European performances?

Though some hard-liners will argue Tottenham Hotspur have 'achieved nothing' until they hold a trophy aloft, football is also about memorable moments and their victory over Real Madrid was certainly one of those. A pinch-yourself night for any Spurs fan at Wembley, their forensic deconstruction of the Champions League holders was a perfect encapsulation of their progress under Mauricio Pochettino. But where does it stand among other landmark performances by English teams in European competition?  NB. The list is based on the quality of the performances, not the glory of the occasion - or else this would be a list of all the European finals English teams have won.  10. Lazio 0 Leeds United 1, Champions League group stage, 2000  There have been some impressive performances in Rome by English teams, not least Liverpool beating Roma on penalties in the 1984 European Cup final. However, the Lazio team Leeds defeated now reads as a roll-call of some of Europe's best, and they were Serie A champions. Alan Smith's goal was enough for the three points in a hostile atmosphere against the likes of Alessandro Nesta, Diego Simeone, Juan Sebastian Veron, Attilio Lombard, Pavel Nedved and Hernan Crespo. Leeds would reach the semi-finals that season, before their gradual descent from the never-never land began amid financial turmoil.  9. Fulham 4 Juventus 1, Uefa Cup last-16, 2010  A performance that ticks all of the boxes for a great European showing: small, romantic club against Italian powerhouse, the dreadful start followed by unlikely comeback and Bobby Zamora throwing his weight around. Fulham did not go on to win the tournament, losing the final to Atletico Madrid. But try telling Fulham fans that makes this win any less significant.  Trailing 2-1 after the first leg, things were looking bleak for Roy Hodgson's side when David Trezeguet put the Old Lady in front inside two minutes at Craven Cottage. In a way reminiscent of Middlesbrough's comeback win against Steaua Bucharest in 2008, Fulham kept throwing bodies forward and duly found holes in the Juventus defence. Zamora levelled, before Fabio Cannavro's sending off swung the tie in their favour. Zoltan Gera scored twice before Clint Dempsey scored the winner with a delicious chip.  Bobby Zamora lines up his first goal 8. Koln 0 Nottingham Forest 1, European Cup semi-final, 1979 No collection of English football's finest European performances would be complete without reference to Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest. Having knocked out Liverpool on their way to the last-four, Forest appeared done for after a helter-skelter first leg against Koln finished 3-3 at the City ground. "The general consensus of the so-called experts, the sportswriters and the television pundits, was that we were out of the competition already," Clough reflected in his autobiography. "If I'd listened to that lot I wouldn't have bothered taking the team to Germany for the return leg."  But take a team to Germany he did, and Forest produced a calm and professional performance to win 1-0 courtesy of an Ian Bowyer winning goal. They beat Malmo in the final, but their victory in Germany was the toughest test of their European Cup run.  7. Liverpool 4 Real Madrid 0, Champions League last-16, 2009  One of many exceptional European displays by Liverpool in this period, who saw off Chelsea, Arsenal, Inter, Barcelona and Juventus over two legs between 2005 and 2009 in the Champions League. However, as Tottenham fans will tell you, there is an intangible glamour to toppling Real Madrid. Liverpool had the cushion of a 1-0 away win to take to Anfield, but the ease with which they dispatched their illustrious opponents was no less impressive.  Overwhelming Real with a frenetic pace of play, Fernando Torres tormented his former rivals with a dynamic centre forward's performance. He opened the scoring before Steven Gerrard scored twice and Andrea Dossena added to their misery. Los Blancos responded to their humiliation by signing Cristiano Ronaldo for a world record fee that summer.  Steven Gerrard dispatches as Arjen Robben looks on Credit: AFP 6. Bayern Munich 1 Norwich City 2, Uefa Cup second-round, 1993  Ah, the good old days when the Uefa Cup was a proper competition that did not mess around with money-spinning, soporific, group stages. Norwich were regular early-season pacesetters in the 'Premiership's' formative years, but this is the result they still speak about at the north end of the A11. The first - and only - English club to win at Bayern's former home the Olympic Stadium, Norwich secured the monumental result via a Jeremy Goss volley and Mark Bowen header, and a 1-1 draw in the return leg at Carrow Road saw them through.  Possibly even better than the result though, was Norwich's psychedelic patterned kit that Bayern said they were 'still haunted' by years later. When it was launched before the start of the season fans likened it to a ‘shower curtain’, a ‘90’s low budget travel agent uniform’ and ‘Stagecoach seats’.  5. Spurs 3 Real Madrid 1, Champions League group stage, 2017 The night Tottenham finally threw off the inferiority complex that has lingered despite their rise under Pochettino. Spurs took full advantage of Real's perfunctory attempts to work hard and defend, with Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli scarcely able to believe the acres of green Wembley turf that surrounded them.  In truth, had Spurs executed their passes in the final-third with greater accuracy, this could have been a real pasting - but you take your 3-1 wins over Real Madrid however you can. Alli scored the first, turning home the impressive Kieran Trippier's cross, before his second and a Christian Eriksen strike sealed the game. Group stage matches can fade from view by the time they knockout stages come around, but Spurs fans should savour Wednesday's win for it's own sake. Even if Tottenham go out in the next round, who really cares? It will not make their famous victory any less 'meaningful'.  The 100 greatest Champions League moments 4. Benfica 1 Manchester United 5, European Cup quarter-final, 1966 Best's goal in the 1968 final against the same opponents at Wembley is imprinted on the brain, but it was Best's performance in this resounding Lisbon victory that won him admirers across the continent. United led 3-2 from the first leg at Old Trafford, but Best dazzled as they put the tie beyond reach with two goals and an assist inside the first 15 minutes. "A hurricane passed through the Luz that night,” Benfica’s Antonio Simoes said, “and his name was George Best.” The Portuguese paper Bola described famously described Best as ‘El Beatle’. 3. Inter Milan 1 Arsenal 5, Champions League, group stage, 2003 Things were going swimmingly for Arsenal domestically, but as tended to be the case, Arsene Wenger's side saved their worst for European competition. They were beaten 3-0 at Highbury by Inter in the first group match, followed that a 0-0 draw at Locomotiv Moscow and a calamitous 2-1 defeat away to Dynamo Kiev. One point from nine then, and were it not for a late Ashley Cole winner in the return game against Kiev this tie in Milan would have been academic.  Without Gilberto Silva and an injured Patrick Vieira, Ray Parlour captained Arsenal and started alongside Edu in central midfield. Arsenal started confidently, Theirry Henry giving them the lead after some trademark combination play with Cole and Robert Pires but Christian Vieri levelled with a fluky goal before half-time. Unperturbed, Arsenal kept playing their game and ran away with it in the second half. Thierry Henry celebrates as Ray Parlour eyes up a post-match Cobra Credit: Getty Images Freddie Ljungberg, Edu and Pires deserved honourable mentions for their goals, but it was Henry's second and Arsenal's third that was the image of the game. Arsenal cleared an Inter corner and set off on the counter-attack through the Frenchman, who drove Javier Zanetti back into his own penalty area. The Inter legend did exactly what the textbook says, showing Henry the outside and onto his 'weaker' left foot. He could only watch helplessly as Henry drilled a a left-foot shoot into the far corner.  A goal served best with Clive Tyldesley's delightful line: "Steve Bruce said at the weekend that he is the best player in the world...ANYBODY ARGUING?" 2. Chelsea 4 Barcelona 2, Champions League last-16, 2005  Those wishing to argue that Jose Mourinho's teams can play exciting football always marshall this game at Stamford Bridge to support their case. Yes, Chelsea got bodies behind the ball and defended in numbers, but when possession was regained they scythed through Barcelona with an exhibition of counter-attacking football. The word 'transitions' was not in wide usage outside of Mourinho's famous dossiers, but this was the perfect example of how to utilise them to your advantage.  Chelsea were 3-0 up inside 20 minutes at Stamford Bridge, thanks to Eidur Gudjohnsen, Frank Lampard and Damien Duff - with the Irish winger's goal the pick of the lot. That put Chelsea 4-2 up on aggregate, before Barcelona fought back to 4-4 through a Ronaldinho penalty and a sumptuous toe-poke from outside the penalty area. John Terry grabbed the winner to settle a tempestuous contest in which Jose Mourinho and Frank Rijkaard clashed on the sidelines.  Jose Mourinho celebrates in his famous overcoat Credit: Getty Images 1. Juventus 2 Manchester United 3, Champions League, semi-final, 1999 Nothing will beat 'that night in Barcelona' for drama, but Man Utd's gladiatorial display in Turin was the best performance of their triumphant Champions League run in 1999. After a 1-1 draw in the first leg at Old Trafford, two early goals by Filipo Inzaghi - the striker Sir Alex Ferguson once said was 'born offside' - left United's treble ambitions in jeopardy.  That was until Roy Keane intervened. The skipper produced a seminal performance and sparked the comeback with a headed goal from a David Beckham corner. Dwight Yorke scored another header to level before the interval, and progress to the final was sealed by Andy Cole late-on. The night however, will always be remembered as Keane's finest hour who played through the disappointment of a yellow card that ruled him out of the final. No Gascoigne-like tears from him. 

Where does Spurs's Real Madrid win rank in English football's best European performances?

Though some hard-liners will argue Tottenham Hotspur have 'achieved nothing' until they hold a trophy aloft, football is also about memorable moments and their victory over Real Madrid was certainly one of those. A pinch-yourself night for any Spurs fan at Wembley, their forensic deconstruction of the Champions League holders was a perfect encapsulation of their progress under Mauricio Pochettino. But where does it stand among other landmark performances by English teams in European competition?  NB. The list is based on the quality of the performances, not the glory of the occasion - or else this would be a list of all the European finals English teams have won.  10. Lazio 0 Leeds United 1, Champions League group stage, 2000  There have been some impressive performances in Rome by English teams, not least Liverpool beating Roma on penalties in the 1984 European Cup final. However, the Lazio team Leeds defeated now reads as a roll-call of some of Europe's best, and they were Serie A champions. Alan Smith's goal was enough for the three points in a hostile atmosphere against the likes of Alessandro Nesta, Diego Simeone, Juan Sebastian Veron, Attilio Lombard, Pavel Nedved and Hernan Crespo. Leeds would reach the semi-finals that season, before their gradual descent from the never-never land began amid financial turmoil.  9. Fulham 4 Juventus 1, Uefa Cup last-16, 2010  A performance that ticks all of the boxes for a great European showing: small, romantic club against Italian powerhouse, the dreadful start followed by unlikely comeback and Bobby Zamora throwing his weight around. Fulham did not go on to win the tournament, losing the final to Atletico Madrid. But try telling Fulham fans that makes this win any less significant.  Trailing 2-1 after the first leg, things were looking bleak for Roy Hodgson's side when David Trezeguet put the Old Lady in front inside two minutes at Craven Cottage. In a way reminiscent of Middlesbrough's comeback win against Steaua Bucharest in 2008, Fulham kept throwing bodies forward and duly found holes in the Juventus defence. Zamora levelled, before Fabio Cannavro's sending off swung the tie in their favour. Zoltan Gera scored twice before Clint Dempsey scored the winner with a delicious chip.  Bobby Zamora lines up his first goal 8. Koln 0 Nottingham Forest 1, European Cup semi-final, 1979 No collection of English football's finest European performances would be complete without reference to Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest. Having knocked out Liverpool on their way to the last-four, Forest appeared done for after a helter-skelter first leg against Koln finished 3-3 at the City ground. "The general consensus of the so-called experts, the sportswriters and the television pundits, was that we were out of the competition already," Clough reflected in his autobiography. "If I'd listened to that lot I wouldn't have bothered taking the team to Germany for the return leg."  But take a team to Germany he did, and Forest produced a calm and professional performance to win 1-0 courtesy of an Ian Bowyer winning goal. They beat Malmo in the final, but their victory in Germany was the toughest test of their European Cup run.  7. Liverpool 4 Real Madrid 0, Champions League last-16, 2009  One of many exceptional European displays by Liverpool in this period, who saw off Chelsea, Arsenal, Inter, Barcelona and Juventus over two legs between 2005 and 2009 in the Champions League. However, as Tottenham fans will tell you, there is an intangible glamour to toppling Real Madrid. Liverpool had the cushion of a 1-0 away win to take to Anfield, but the ease with which they dispatched their illustrious opponents was no less impressive.  Overwhelming Real with a frenetic pace of play, Fernando Torres tormented his former rivals with a dynamic centre forward's performance. He opened the scoring before Steven Gerrard scored twice and Andrea Dossena added to their misery. Los Blancos responded to their humiliation by signing Cristiano Ronaldo for a world record fee that summer.  Steven Gerrard dispatches as Arjen Robben looks on Credit: AFP 6. Bayern Munich 1 Norwich City 2, Uefa Cup second-round, 1993  Ah, the good old days when the Uefa Cup was a proper competition that did not mess around with money-spinning, soporific, group stages. Norwich were regular early-season pacesetters in the 'Premiership's' formative years, but this is the result they still speak about at the north end of the A11. The first - and only - English club to win at Bayern's former home the Olympic Stadium, Norwich secured the monumental result via a Jeremy Goss volley and Mark Bowen header, and a 1-1 draw in the return leg at Carrow Road saw them through.  Possibly even better than the result though, was Norwich's psychedelic patterned kit that Bayern said they were 'still haunted' by years later. When it was launched before the start of the season fans likened it to a ‘shower curtain’, a ‘90’s low budget travel agent uniform’ and ‘Stagecoach seats’.  5. Spurs 3 Real Madrid 1, Champions League group stage, 2017 The night Tottenham finally threw off the inferiority complex that has lingered despite their rise under Pochettino. Spurs took full advantage of Real's perfunctory attempts to work hard and defend, with Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli scarcely able to believe the acres of green Wembley turf that surrounded them.  In truth, had Spurs executed their passes in the final-third with greater accuracy, this could have been a real pasting - but you take your 3-1 wins over Real Madrid however you can. Alli scored the first, turning home the impressive Kieran Trippier's cross, before his second and a Christian Eriksen strike sealed the game. Group stage matches can fade from view by the time they knockout stages come around, but Spurs fans should savour Wednesday's win for it's own sake. Even if Tottenham go out in the next round, who really cares? It will not make their famous victory any less 'meaningful'.  The 100 greatest Champions League moments 4. Benfica 1 Manchester United 5, European Cup quarter-final, 1966 Best's goal in the 1968 final against the same opponents at Wembley is imprinted on the brain, but it was Best's performance in this resounding Lisbon victory that won him admirers across the continent. United led 3-2 from the first leg at Old Trafford, but Best dazzled as they put the tie beyond reach with two goals and an assist inside the first 15 minutes. "A hurricane passed through the Luz that night,” Benfica’s Antonio Simoes said, “and his name was George Best.” The Portuguese paper Bola described famously described Best as ‘El Beatle’. 3. Inter Milan 1 Arsenal 5, Champions League, group stage, 2003 Things were going swimmingly for Arsenal domestically, but as tended to be the case, Arsene Wenger's side saved their worst for European competition. They were beaten 3-0 at Highbury by Inter in the first group match, followed that a 0-0 draw at Locomotiv Moscow and a calamitous 2-1 defeat away to Dynamo Kiev. One point from nine then, and were it not for a late Ashley Cole winner in the return game against Kiev this tie in Milan would have been academic.  Without Gilberto Silva and an injured Patrick Vieira, Ray Parlour captained Arsenal and started alongside Edu in central midfield. Arsenal started confidently, Theirry Henry giving them the lead after some trademark combination play with Cole and Robert Pires but Christian Vieri levelled with a fluky goal before half-time. Unperturbed, Arsenal kept playing their game and ran away with it in the second half. Thierry Henry celebrates as Ray Parlour eyes up a post-match Cobra Credit: Getty Images Freddie Ljungberg, Edu and Pires deserved honourable mentions for their goals, but it was Henry's second and Arsenal's third that was the image of the game. Arsenal cleared an Inter corner and set off on the counter-attack through the Frenchman, who drove Javier Zanetti back into his own penalty area. The Inter legend did exactly what the textbook says, showing Henry the outside and onto his 'weaker' left foot. He could only watch helplessly as Henry drilled a a left-foot shoot into the far corner.  A goal served best with Clive Tyldesley's delightful line: "Steve Bruce said at the weekend that he is the best player in the world...ANYBODY ARGUING?" 2. Chelsea 4 Barcelona 2, Champions League last-16, 2005  Those wishing to argue that Jose Mourinho's teams can play exciting football always marshall this game at Stamford Bridge to support their case. Yes, Chelsea got bodies behind the ball and defended in numbers, but when possession was regained they scythed through Barcelona with an exhibition of counter-attacking football. The word 'transitions' was not in wide usage outside of Mourinho's famous dossiers, but this was the perfect example of how to utilise them to your advantage.  Chelsea were 3-0 up inside 20 minutes at Stamford Bridge, thanks to Eidur Gudjohnsen, Frank Lampard and Damien Duff - with the Irish winger's goal the pick of the lot. That put Chelsea 4-2 up on aggregate, before Barcelona fought back to 4-4 through a Ronaldinho penalty and a sumptuous toe-poke from outside the penalty area. John Terry grabbed the winner to settle a tempestuous contest in which Jose Mourinho and Frank Rijkaard clashed on the sidelines.  Jose Mourinho celebrates in his famous overcoat Credit: Getty Images 1. Juventus 2 Manchester United 3, Champions League, semi-final, 1999 Nothing will beat 'that night in Barcelona' for drama, but Man Utd's gladiatorial display in Turin was the best performance of their triumphant Champions League run in 1999. After a 1-1 draw in the first leg at Old Trafford, two early goals by Filipo Inzaghi - the striker Sir Alex Ferguson once said was 'born offside' - left United's treble ambitions in jeopardy.  That was until Roy Keane intervened. The skipper produced a seminal performance and sparked the comeback with a headed goal from a David Beckham corner. Dwight Yorke scored another header to level before the interval, and progress to the final was sealed by Andy Cole late-on. The night however, will always be remembered as Keane's finest hour who played through the disappointment of a yellow card that ruled him out of the final. No Gascoigne-like tears from him. 

Real Madrid Star Cristiano Ronaldo Almost Joined Juventus in 2003 Before Swap Deal 'Collapsed'

Alessandro Moggi, the son of Juventus' former general director Luciano, has claimed that Juventus were within a hair's breadth of signing superstar Cristiano Ronaldo in 2003.  In an interview with Tuttosport, Moggi claimed that during his time working as a football agent, Juventus came close to signing Ronaldo, who at the time played for Portuguese side Sporting Lisbon. Discussing the failed deal, Moggi stated: "Ronaldo was offered to Parma and Lazio but they rejected a chance to sign...

Real Madrid Star Cristiano Ronaldo Almost Joined Juventus in 2003 Before Swap Deal 'Collapsed'

Alessandro Moggi, the son of Juventus' former general director Luciano, has claimed that Juventus were within a hair's breadth of signing superstar Cristiano Ronaldo in 2003.  In an interview with Tuttosport, Moggi claimed that during his time working as a football agent, Juventus came close to signing Ronaldo, who at the time played for Portuguese side Sporting Lisbon. Discussing the failed deal, Moggi stated: "Ronaldo was offered to Parma and Lazio but they rejected a chance to sign...

Serie A: 11. Spieltag: Neapel weiter unaufhaltsam - Inter siegt

Am 11. Spieltag der Serie A hat Juventus Turin das Spitzenspiel gegen den AC Milan gewonnen, Lazio schießt ein hilfloses Benevento ab. Der ungeschlagene Tabellenführer SSC Neapel gewinnt ungefährdet, Florenz stolpert bei Crotone. Inter Mailand müht sich bei Hellas Verona zum Sieg. Hier gibt es alle Infos zu den Begegnungen, der Tabelle und Highlights der Partien.

Serie A: Marschiert Neapel weiter?

Am 12. Spieltag der Serie A muss der noch ungeschlagene Tabellenführer Neapel bei Chievo Verona ran. Die beiden ärgsten Verfolger haben eine Heimpartie zu absolvieren. Juventus Turin empfängt das punktlose Schlusslicht Benevento, bei Lazio Rom ist Udinese Calcio zu Gast. Hier gibt es alle Infos zu den Begegnungen, der Tabelle, den Livestreams und den Livetickern.

Inzaghi: "Immobile? Deve continuare così. E su Nani..."

Tutto facile per la Lazio al Vigorito: manita al Benevento, sesta vittoria di fila e aggancio alla Juventus in classifica. Inzaghi appare soddisfatto in conferenza stampa, soprattutto del solito, incontenibile Ciro Immobile.

Inzaghi: "Immobile? Deve continuare così. E su Nani..."

Tutto facile per la Lazio al Vigorito: manita al Benevento, sesta vittoria di fila e aggancio alla Juventus in classifica. Inzaghi appare soddisfatto in conferenza stampa, soprattutto del solito, incontenibile Ciro Immobile.

Inzaghi: "Immobile? Deve continuare così. E su Nani..."

Tutto facile per la Lazio al Vigorito: manita al Benevento, sesta vittoria di fila e aggancio alla Juventus in classifica. Inzaghi appare soddisfatto in conferenza stampa, soprattutto del solito, incontenibile Ciro Immobile.

Inzaghi: "Immobile? Deve continuare così. E su Nani..."

Tutto facile per la Lazio al Vigorito: manita al Benevento, sesta vittoria di fila e aggancio alla Juventus in classifica. Inzaghi appare soddisfatto in conferenza stampa, soprattutto del solito, incontenibile Ciro Immobile.

Inzaghi: "Immobile? Deve continuare così. E su Nani..."

Tutto facile per la Lazio al Vigorito: manita al Benevento, sesta vittoria di fila e aggancio alla Juventus in classifica. Inzaghi appare soddisfatto in conferenza stampa, soprattutto del solito, incontenibile Ciro Immobile.

Inzaghi: "Immobile? Deve continuare così. E su Nani..."

Tutto facile per la Lazio al Vigorito: manita al Benevento, sesta vittoria di fila e aggancio alla Juventus in classifica. Inzaghi appare soddisfatto in conferenza stampa, soprattutto del solito, incontenibile Ciro Immobile.

Napoli 3 Sassuolo 1: Partenopei go clear at Serie A summit

Napoli have pulled clear of Lazio and Juventus at the top of Serie A as they brushed aside a limited Sassuolo outfit.

Serie A: 11. Spieltag: Lazio haut Benevento weg, Juve knackt Milan

Am 11. Spieltag der Serie A hat Juventus Turin das Spitzenspiel gegen den AC Milan gewonnen, Lazio schießt ein hilfloses Benevento ab. Der ungeschlagene Tabellenführer SSC Neapel hat derweil den Tabellenfünfzehnten US Sassuolo zu Gast. Inter Mailand muss am Montagabend gegen Hellas Verona ran. Hier gibt es alle Infos zu den Begegnungen, der Tabelle, den Livestreams und den Livetickern.

Police identify 20 Lazio fans who put up Anne Frank images

Players observe a minute of silence prior to the Serie A soccer match between Juventus and Spal at the Allianz Stadium in Turin, Italy, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017. Anne Frank's diary will be read aloud at all soccer matches in Italy this week, the Italian soccer federation announced Tuesday after shocking displays of anti-Semitism by fans of the Rome club Lazio. Lazio supporters on Sunday littered the Stadio Olimpico in Rome with images of Anne Frank, the young diarist who died in the Holocaust, wearing a jersey of city rival Roma. The ultra right-wing fans of Lazio associate their Roma counterparts with being left-wing and Jewish, and had hoped to incite Roma fans, since the teams share the same stadium. (Alessandro Di Marco/ANSA via AP)

Players observe a minute of silence prior to the Serie A soccer match between Juventus and Spal at the Allianz Stadium in Turin, Italy, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017. Anne Frank's diary will be read aloud at all soccer matches in Italy this week, the Italian soccer federation announced Tuesday after shocking displays of anti-Semitism by fans of the Rome club Lazio. Lazio supporters on Sunday littered the Stadio Olimpico in Rome with images of Anne Frank, the young diarist who died in the Holocaust, wearing a jersey of city rival Roma. The ultra right-wing fans of Lazio associate their Roma counterparts with being left-wing and Jewish, and had hoped to incite Roma fans, since the teams share the same stadium. (Alessandro Di Marco/ANSA via AP)

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