Nuoto

Le foto del nuoto e degli sport acquatici

Can You Build Muscle Mass Through Swimming?

Swimming is an excellent, low-impact exercise for burning calories and getting fit. It's ideal for those with injuries, joint problems or other issues...

Can You Build Muscle Mass Through Swimming?

Swimming is an excellent, low-impact exercise for burning calories and getting fit. It's ideal for those with injuries, joint problems or other issues...

Can You Build Muscle Mass Through Swimming?

Swimming is an excellent, low-impact exercise for burning calories and getting fit. It's ideal for those with injuries, joint problems or other issues...

Missy Franklin starting new year, new chapter in Georgia

FILE -In this June 4, 2016, file photo, Missy Franklin competes in the finals of the women's 200-meter freestyle at the Longhorn Aquatics Elite Invite swimming event in Austin, Texas. The five-time Olympic gold medalist has relocated to Athens, Ga., where she is pursuing a psychology degree and mounting a comeback in the pool. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

FILE -In this June 4, 2016, file photo, Missy Franklin competes in the finals of the women's 200-meter freestyle at the Longhorn Aquatics Elite Invite swimming event in Austin, Texas. The five-time Olympic gold medalist has relocated to Athens, Ga., where she is pursuing a psychology degree and mounting a comeback in the pool. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

The Tennis Debate: Nick Kyrgios’s magnetism is badly needed with Big Four finally on the wane

Nick Kyrgios is a bit like a 22-man shoving match in a game of football.  Yes, they set a bad example to children, yes they can be unedifying, and yes they can sometimes overstep the mark.  But both are also extremely entertaining and amusing to watch, and there's usually no real harm done.  Kyrgios, as has been well documented, is tennis’s answer to marmite (or, given his nationality, should that be vegemite?). For some the 22-year-old is an enfant terrible whose sledging of opponents and occasional tanking are disgraceful examples of his unsportsmanlike behaviour. For others he’s a fascinating young man who plays majestic tennis and is merely hitting a few bumps in the road as he tries to cope with being a professional athlete.  Wherever one stands on the debate though, surely no-one can deny his magnetism. And with the ‘Big Four’ era seemingly on the wane at last, tennis desperately needs some new stars. Australian Open 2018 | Key information for first grand slam of year As a tournament director, selling tickets to a Kyrgios match is a cinch - fans are likely to get either scintillating shot-making or an existential crisis, or a combination of both. Who wouldn’t want to see that?  And who wouldn’t want to hear Kyrgios’s post-match analysis of why he has just been beaten? Forget the “it was a tough match that could have gone either way” platitudes, Kyrgios once said of a Wimbledon defeat to Andy Murray: "To be honest, I woke up this morning and played computer games. Is that the greatest preparation? I don't know. But it was fun.” Imagine now you’re that tournament director trying to sell tickets to, say, a regulation Tomas Berdych match.   What’s your pitch there? “Roll up, roll up. Get your line and length groundstrokes. You want percentage tennis played to a T? Have I got the guy for you!” Special report: Cheating claims, Christmas McDonald's and throwing matches to catch flights - the reality of pro tennis away from the elite This is not meant as a slight on Berdych, who has been a model of professionalism and consistency for more than a decade.  It’s just that sport should be about variety, and star quality, and above all fun. Kyrgios is a hyperactive amalgamation of all has all of those qualities , and at a time when tennis has been producing serve-bots like Milos Raonic and nice-but-bland Marin Cilic types, it’s stimulating to have someone a little bit different, and let’s face it a little bit unhinged. It’s probably unfair that the model pros generate so much less interest than the mercurial Kyrgios, but it's human nature to be more intrigued by the mad than the mundane.  And the great thing about tennis is there’s room for both - try for example to find similarities with David Ferrer’s game style and Kyrgios's. It's impossible - it would be like comparing swimming lengths to playing water polo.  The Aussie certainly has his faults, but we shouldn't take his misdemeanours too seriously, and I can't wait to see which way the Kyrgios roulette wheel spins at the Australian Open over the next two weeks.  Where do you stand on the Nick Kyrgios debate? Have your say in the comments section below

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant exits from a pool after swimming in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant prepares to swim in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- Participants come out from a waiting room as they prepare to swim in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant swims in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant poses for photo after swimming in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant swims in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant swims in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant swims in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- Participants jump into the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- Participants jump into the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- Participants warm up as they prepare to swim in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant exits from a pool after swimming in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant prepares to swim in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant exits from a pool after swimming in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- An aerial view shows participants swimming in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- A participant swims in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

WU05. Harbin (China), 06/01/2018.- An aerial view shows participants swimming in the freezing waters of the Songhua River during a winter swimming competition at the 34th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 06 January 2018. About 600 winter swimmers took part in the competition. EFE/EPA/WU HONG

Swimmers brave cold in ice swimming contest in Harbin, China

Swimmers compete in an ice swimming contest in a pool carved from the frozen ice of the Songhua river, during the annual Harbin Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, in China's northeast Heilongjiang province.

Swimmers brave cold in ice swimming contest in Harbin, China

Swimmers compete in an ice swimming contest in a pool carved from the frozen ice of the Songhua river, during the annual Harbin Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, in China's northeast Heilongjiang province.

Swimmers brave cold in ice swimming contest in Harbin, China

Swimmers compete in an ice swimming contest in a pool carved from the frozen ice of the Songhua river, during the annual Harbin Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, in China's northeast Heilongjiang province.

Swimmers brave cold in ice swimming contest in Harbin, China

Swimmers compete in an ice swimming contest in a pool carved from the frozen ice of the Songhua river, during the annual Harbin Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, in China's northeast Heilongjiang province.

Pippa Grange tasked with improving England's 'psychological resilience' at major finals

The most senior woman appointed by the Football Association across the men’s game starts work this week charged with making England’s teams better equipped to succeed at international tournaments, including Gareth Southgate’s side at this summer’s World Cup finals in Russia. Pippa Grange, 47, is tasked with changing the culture and mindset of England teams, and increasing their “psychological resilience” to the pressure of winning critical matches, a repeat failing since the nation’s single international triumph in 1966.  While the FA is moving away from the notion of a big name for the mental preparation, as it did with psychiatrist Steve Peters for the 2014 World Cup finals, that is Grange’s expert field and she will work on the approach of all staff and players. Based at St George’s Park, she will answer to Dan Ashworth, the technical director, and Dave Reddin, head of team strategy and performance. She was appointed in November and the FA denies her arrival has anything to do with the perceived shortcomings of the organisation over the Eniola Aluko episode. Among women working in performance, only Dr Charlotte Cowie, head of medical services, is on a similar level. Grange will work with all 16 men’s and women’s teams, and coaches, staff and players will be expected to be ­receptive to her ideas and programmes. As the head of people and team development, her appointment is the culmination of what the FA says was a worldwide search for a suitable figure. Originally from Harrogate in North Yorkshire, Grange moved to Australia in 1996, where she has lived until now, and was a key figure in the players’ association for the country’s native football code. With a doctorate in applied psychology, her expertise is in improving all aspects of a team’s performance, and she was part of the review of Australia’s national swimming federations after their conspicuous failures at the 2012 Olympics. Pippa Grange, 47, is tasked with changing the culture and mindset of England teams Credit: Pippa Grange/LinkedIn The FA believes it has made great strides over the past two years with performance consultants Lane 4, who provided support and challenge established ways of working, including a role with the under-17s team who won their age-group World Cup. The ultimate aim was to formulate an equivalent FA department, which is why Grange has been appointed. A Loughborough University graduate and a former women’s basketball player in the National League, she challenged the Australian Football League in 2008 for what she regarded as its abandonment of the former player Ben Cousins during his drug addiction. In 2010, her success in persuading the outspoken former player Jason Akermanis to address sexuality in the AFL backfired when he wrote a newspaper column discouraging gay players from coming out, a view which was condemned by senior figures in the sport at the time. She came to prominence in Australian sport as the general manager of culture and leadership at the AFL’s player association, and then later worked as a consultant to AFL clubs and also in businesses outside of sport, via her own consultancy. Speaking about elite Australian Rules footballers in an interview in 2010, she said: “They’re blokes, they’re just blokes, and I respect them on the whole. Of course there have been times across the years when I’ve rolled my eyes … there are all sorts of characters, for better or worse. But who would want vanilla?” On her FA appointment, Grange said: “I’m excited to be joining the FA at such a pivotal time in the journey and humbled by the opportunity to contribute to a forward-thinking and determined organisation.”

Pippa Grange tasked with improving England's 'psychological resilience' at major finals

The most senior woman appointed by the Football Association across the men’s game starts work this week charged with making England’s teams better equipped to succeed at international tournaments, including Gareth Southgate’s side at this summer’s World Cup finals in Russia. Pippa Grange, 47, is tasked with changing the culture and mindset of England teams, and increasing their “psychological resilience” to the pressure of winning critical matches, a repeat failing since the nation’s single international triumph in 1966.  While the FA is moving away from the notion of a big name for the mental preparation, as it did with psychiatrist Steve Peters for the 2014 World Cup finals, that is Grange’s expert field and she will work on the approach of all staff and players. Based at St George’s Park, she will answer to Dan Ashworth, the technical director, and Dave Reddin, head of team strategy and performance. She was appointed in November and the FA denies her arrival has anything to do with the perceived shortcomings of the organisation over the Eniola Aluko episode. Among women working in performance, only Dr Charlotte Cowie, head of medical services, is on a similar level. Grange will work with all 16 men’s and women’s teams, and coaches, staff and players will be expected to be ­receptive to her ideas and programmes. As the head of people and team development, her appointment is the culmination of what the FA says was a worldwide search for a suitable figure. Originally from Harrogate in North Yorkshire, Grange moved to Australia in 1996, where she has lived until now, and was a key figure in the players’ association for the country’s native football code. With a doctorate in applied psychology, her expertise is in improving all aspects of a team’s performance, and she was part of the review of Australia’s national swimming federations after their conspicuous failures at the 2012 Olympics. Pippa Grange, 47, is tasked with changing the culture and mindset of England teams Credit: Pippa Grange/LinkedIn The FA believes it has made great strides over the past two years with performance consultants Lane 4, who provided support and challenge established ways of working, including a role with the under-17s team who won their age-group World Cup. The ultimate aim was to formulate an equivalent FA department, which is why Grange has been appointed. A Loughborough University graduate and a former women’s basketball player in the National League, she challenged the Australian Football League in 2008 for what she regarded as its abandonment of the former player Ben Cousins during his drug addiction. In 2010, her success in persuading the outspoken former player Jason Akermanis to address sexuality in the AFL backfired when he wrote a newspaper column discouraging gay players from coming out, a view which was condemned by senior figures in the sport at the time. She came to prominence in Australian sport as the general manager of culture and leadership at the AFL’s player association, and then later worked as a consultant to AFL clubs and also in businesses outside of sport, via her own consultancy. Speaking about elite Australian Rules footballers in an interview in 2010, she said: “They’re blokes, they’re just blokes, and I respect them on the whole. Of course there have been times across the years when I’ve rolled my eyes … there are all sorts of characters, for better or worse. But who would want vanilla?” On her FA appointment, Grange said: “I’m excited to be joining the FA at such a pivotal time in the journey and humbled by the opportunity to contribute to a forward-thinking and determined organisation.”

CIUDAD DE MÉXICO Swimming/Natación-Nelly Miranda

CIUDAD DE MÉXICO Swimming/Natación-Nelly Miranda.- La nadadora paralímpica mexicana, Nelly Miranda, es considerada por los lectores de El UNIVERSAL Deportes como la Mujer del Año. Foto: Archivo Agencia EL UNIVERSAL/JMA

Tourists swim alongside whale sharks in northern Mexico

Its name may frighten some, but the giant whale shark is actually a docile and friendly swimming companion - as tourists who arrive at Mexico’s La Paz bay to swim with the creatures find out.

Tourists swim alongside whale sharks in northern Mexico

Its name may frighten some, but the giant whale shark is actually a docile and friendly swimming companion - as tourists who arrive at Mexico’s La Paz bay to swim with the creatures find out.

Tourists swim alongside whale sharks in northern Mexico

Its name may frighten some, but the giant whale shark is actually a docile and friendly swimming companion - as tourists who arrive at Mexico’s La Paz bay to swim with the creatures find out.

Tourists swim alongside whale sharks in northern Mexico

Its name may frighten some, but the giant whale shark is actually a docile and friendly swimming companion - as tourists who arrive at Mexico’s La Paz bay to swim with the creatures find out.

Jackson said a year ago he would be "swimming" in Lake Erie if the Browns went 1-15 again, and the Browns will finish with the same record if they upset playoff-bound Pittsburgh on the road on Sunday

Jackson said a year ago he would be "swimming" in Lake Erie if the Browns went 1-15 again, and the Browns will finish with the same record if they upset playoff-bound Pittsburgh on the road on Sunday (AFP Photo/Dylan Buell)

Katie Ledecky swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year honors

FILE - In this July 25, 2017, file photo, United States' Katie Ledecky reacts after winning the gold medal in the women's 1500-meter freestyle final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary. Ledecky was named The Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year on Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic, File)

Katie Ledecky swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year honors

FILE - In this July 29, 2017, file photo, United States' gold medal winner Katie Ledecky shows off her medal after the women's 800-meter freestyle final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)

Katie Ledecky swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year honors

FILE - In this July 28, 2017, file photo, United States' Katie Ledecky competes in a women's 800-meter freestyle heat during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships, in Budapest, Hungary. Ledecky was named The Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year on Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

Katie Ledecky swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year honors

FILE - In this July 23, 2017, file photo, United States' gold medal winner Katie Ledecky smiles during the ceremony for the women's 400-meter final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary. Ledecky was named The Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year on Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

Katie Ledecky swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year honors

FILE - In this June 27, 2017, file photo, Katie Ledecky swims on her way to winning the women's 800-meter freestyle at the U.S. swimming championships in Indianapolis. Ledecky was named The Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year on Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)

Usando Yahoo accetti che Yahoo e i suoi partners utilizzino cookies per fini di personalizzazione e altre finalità