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Who wore it best? A brief history of footballers in bandages 

Gary Cahill became the talk of Twitter on Wednesday evening after sporting one of the strangest bandage-ensembles ever seen on a football pitch.  28 years after Terry Butcher famously left the field of play with his white kit almost entirely dyed red with blood from head wound, another England centre-back joined the long a list of bandaged footballers to battle on despite a significant head injury. After taking a blow to the chin, Cahill left the field for medical treatment before returning with strapping that stretched from the top of his head all the way around his face to the bottom to his chin. A bandaged-up Gary Cahill battles on at Stamford Bridge Credit: Getty Images  Here are just a few exceptional examples of bandaged-up footballers playing on without a care in the world for their own welfare. Paul Ince A bloodied Paul Ince leads England to World Cup qualification Credit: Getty Images  The Guvernor's finest hour in an England shirt. Battered, bruised and very bloodied, Ince fought back from a nasty head clash to lead England to a crucial goalless draw in Italy, securing qualification to World Cup 1998 in the process. “I remember coming off and the doctor said it would take half an hour to put the stitches in,” said Ince, who was also captain that night. “I wasn’t thinking at all about the cut, I was just thinking about getting back on the pitch. I didn’t want to leave us down to 10 men." Inspiring stuff. Marouane Fellaini Marouane Fellaini battles on with an unorthodox head dressing  Credit: Getty images  A more modern day take on the classic look. Despite Fellaini's dense lock of curls, the Belgian midfielder sustained a cut on his forehead in an aerial clash with Real Madrid defender, Sergio Ramos, during Manchester United's Super Cup defeat to Real Madrid earlier this season.  Manchester United medics were forced to improvise with a reinforced bandage to stem the flow of blood and keep the Belgian's afro in check. The result was John McEnroe-esque masterpiece.  Giorgio Chiellini  Giorgio Chiellini has his head wrapped with a blue bandage  Credit: AP  A player very much cut from the same warrior-defender mould as our own Terry Butcher.  Giorgio Chiellini required eight stitches after colliding with Olympiacios' Bjorn Engels earlier this season, but played on to ensure Juventus got their Champions League campaign off to a winning start. “I’ve got three points on the field and eight stitches in my head," said Chiellini in an Instagram post after the match. "All that counted tonight was the win. Let’s carry on like this." Vedran Corluka  Vedran Corluka sporting some unorthodox head-wear  Credit: EPA  Former Tottenham defender Vedran Corluka required medical attention on four separate occasions after sustaining a nasty head gash in Croatia's Euro 2016 opener against Turkey. A Luka Modric volley handed the Croatians victory against Turkey but it was Corluka's bizarre headwear which will live longest in the memory. After initially having his head wrapped in conventional bandaging, the right-back was forced to improved when the cut re-opened in a clash later on in the game. Corluka returned to the pitch sporting a blue and red swimming hat to keep the dressing in place.

Who wore it best? A brief history of footballers in bandages 

Gary Cahill became the talk of Twitter on Wednesday evening after sporting one of the strangest bandage-ensembles ever seen on a football pitch.  28 years after Terry Butcher famously left the field of play with his white kit almost entirely dyed red with blood from head wound, another England centre-back joined the long a list of bandaged footballers to battle on despite a significant head injury. After taking a blow to the chin, Cahill left the field for medical treatment before returning with strapping that stretched from the top of his head all the way around his face to the bottom to his chin. A bandaged-up Gary Cahill battles on at Stamford Bridge Credit: Getty Images  Here are just a few exceptional examples of bandaged-up footballers playing on without a care in the world for their own welfare. Paul Ince A bloodied Paul Ince leads England to World Cup qualification Credit: Getty Images  The Guvernor's finest hour in an England shirt. Battered, bruised and very bloodied, Ince fought back from a nasty head clash to lead England to a crucial goalless draw in Italy, securing qualification to World Cup 1998 in the process. “I remember coming off and the doctor said it would take half an hour to put the stitches in,” said Ince, who was also captain that night. “I wasn’t thinking at all about the cut, I was just thinking about getting back on the pitch. I didn’t want to leave us down to 10 men." Inspiring stuff. Marouane Fellaini Marouane Fellaini battles on with an unorthodox head dressing  Credit: Getty images  A more modern day take on the classic look. Despite Fellaini's dense lock of curls, the Belgian midfielder sustained a cut on his forehead in an aerial clash with Real Madrid defender, Sergio Ramos, during Manchester United's Super Cup defeat to Real Madrid earlier this season.  Manchester United medics were forced to improvise with a reinforced bandage to stem the flow of blood and keep the Belgian's afro in check. The result was John McEnroe-esque masterpiece.  Giorgio Chiellini  Giorgio Chiellini has his head wrapped with a blue bandage  Credit: AP  A player very much cut from the same warrior-defender mould as our own Terry Butcher.  Giorgio Chiellini required eight stitches after colliding with Olympiacios' Bjorn Engels earlier this season, but played on to ensure Juventus got their Champions League campaign off to a winning start. “I’ve got three points on the field and eight stitches in my head," said Chiellini in an Instagram post after the match. "All that counted tonight was the win. Let’s carry on like this." Vedran Corluka  Vedran Corluka sporting some unorthodox head-wear  Credit: EPA  Former Tottenham defender Vedran Corluka required medical attention on four separate occasions after sustaining a nasty head gash in Croatia's Euro 2016 opener against Turkey. A Luka Modric volley handed the Croatians victory against Turkey but it was Corluka's bizarre headwear which will live longest in the memory. After initially having his head wrapped in conventional bandaging, the right-back was forced to improved when the cut re-opened in a clash later on in the game. Corluka returned to the pitch sporting a blue and red swimming hat to keep the dressing in place.

Who wore it best? A brief history of footballers in bandages 

Gary Cahill became the talk of Twitter on Wednesday evening after sporting one of the strangest bandage-ensembles ever seen on a football pitch.  28 years after Terry Butcher famously left the field of play with his white kit almost entirely dyed red with blood from head wound, another England centre-back joined the long a list of bandaged footballers to battle on despite a significant head injury. After taking a blow to the chin, Cahill left the field for medical treatment before returning with strapping that stretched from the top of his head all the way around his face to the bottom to his chin. A bandaged-up Gary Cahill battles on at Stamford Bridge Credit: Getty Images  Here are just a few exceptional examples of bandaged-up footballers playing on without a care in the world for their own welfare. Paul Ince A bloodied Paul Ince leads England to World Cup qualification Credit: Getty Images  The Guvernor's finest hour in an England shirt. Battered, bruised and very bloodied, Ince fought back from a nasty head clash to lead England to a crucial goalless draw in Italy, securing qualification to World Cup 1998 in the process. “I remember coming off and the doctor said it would take half an hour to put the stitches in,” said Ince, who was also captain that night. “I wasn’t thinking at all about the cut, I was just thinking about getting back on the pitch. I didn’t want to leave us down to 10 men." Inspiring stuff. Marouane Fellaini Marouane Fellaini battles on with an unorthodox head dressing  Credit: Getty images  A more modern day take on the classic look. Despite Fellaini's dense lock of curls, the Belgian midfielder sustained a cut on his forehead in an aerial clash with Real Madrid defender, Sergio Ramos, during Manchester United's Super Cup defeat to Real Madrid earlier this season.  Manchester United medics were forced to improvise with a reinforced bandage to stem the flow of blood and keep the Belgian's afro in check. The result was John McEnroe-esque masterpiece.  Giorgio Chiellini  Giorgio Chiellini has his head wrapped with a blue bandage  Credit: AP  A player very much cut from the same warrior-defender mould as our own Terry Butcher.  Giorgio Chiellini required eight stitches after colliding with Olympiacios' Bjorn Engels earlier this season, but played on to ensure Juventus got their Champions League campaign off to a winning start. “I’ve got three points on the field and eight stitches in my head," said Chiellini in an Instagram post after the match. "All that counted tonight was the win. Let’s carry on like this." Vedran Corluka  Vedran Corluka sporting some unorthodox head-wear  Credit: EPA  Former Tottenham defender Vedran Corluka required medical attention on four separate occasions after sustaining a nasty head gash in Croatia's Euro 2016 opener against Turkey. A Luka Modric volley handed the Croatians victory against Turkey but it was Corluka's bizarre headwear which will live longest in the memory. After initially having his head wrapped in conventional bandaging, the right-back was forced to improved when the cut re-opened in a clash later on in the game. Corluka returned to the pitch sporting a blue and red swimming hat to keep the dressing in place.

Who wore it best? A brief history of footballers in bandages 

Gary Cahill became the talk of Twitter on Wednesday evening after sporting one of the strangest bandage-ensembles ever seen on a football pitch.  28 years after Terry Butcher famously left the field of play with his white kit almost entirely dyed red with blood from head wound, another England centre-back joined the long a list of bandaged footballers to battle on despite a significant head injury. After taking a blow to the chin, Cahill left the field for medical treatment before returning with strapping that stretched from the top of his head all the way around his face to the bottom to his chin. A bandaged-up Gary Cahill battles on at Stamford Bridge Credit: Getty Images  Here are just a few exceptional examples of bandaged-up footballers playing on without a care in the world for their own welfare. Paul Ince A bloodied Paul Ince leads England to World Cup qualification Credit: Getty Images  The Guvernor's finest hour in an England shirt. Battered, bruised and very bloodied, Ince fought back from a nasty head clash to lead England to a crucial goalless draw in Italy, securing qualification to World Cup 1998 in the process. “I remember coming off and the doctor said it would take half an hour to put the stitches in,” said Ince, who was also captain that night. “I wasn’t thinking at all about the cut, I was just thinking about getting back on the pitch. I didn’t want to leave us down to 10 men." Inspiring stuff. Marouane Fellaini Marouane Fellaini battles on with an unorthodox head dressing  Credit: Getty images  A more modern day take on the classic look. Despite Fellaini's dense lock of curls, the Belgian midfielder sustained a cut on his forehead in an aerial clash with Real Madrid defender, Sergio Ramos, during Manchester United's Super Cup defeat to Real Madrid earlier this season.  Manchester United medics were forced to improvise with a reinforced bandage to stem the flow of blood and keep the Belgian's afro in check. The result was John McEnroe-esque masterpiece.  Giorgio Chiellini  Giorgio Chiellini has his head wrapped with a blue bandage  Credit: AP  A player very much cut from the same warrior-defender mould as our own Terry Butcher.  Giorgio Chiellini required eight stitches after colliding with Olympiacios' Bjorn Engels earlier this season, but played on to ensure Juventus got their Champions League campaign off to a winning start. “I’ve got three points on the field and eight stitches in my head," said Chiellini in an Instagram post after the match. "All that counted tonight was the win. Let’s carry on like this." Vedran Corluka  Vedran Corluka sporting some unorthodox head-wear  Credit: EPA  Former Tottenham defender Vedran Corluka required medical attention on four separate occasions after sustaining a nasty head gash in Croatia's Euro 2016 opener against Turkey. A Luka Modric volley handed the Croatians victory against Turkey but it was Corluka's bizarre headwear which will live longest in the memory. After initially having his head wrapped in conventional bandaging, the right-back was forced to improved when the cut re-opened in a clash later on in the game. Corluka returned to the pitch sporting a blue and red swimming hat to keep the dressing in place.

Who wore it best? A brief history of footballers in bandages 

Gary Cahill became the talk of Twitter on Wednesday evening after sporting one of the strangest bandage-ensembles ever seen on a football pitch.  28 years after Terry Butcher famously left the field of play with his white kit almost entirely dyed red with blood from head wound, another England centre-back joined the long a list of bandaged footballers to battle on despite a significant head injury. After taking a blow to the chin, Cahill left the field for medical treatment before returning with strapping that stretched from the top of his head all the way around his face to the bottom to his chin. A bandaged-up Gary Cahill battles on at Stamford Bridge Credit: Getty Images  Here are just a few exceptional examples of bandaged-up footballers playing on without a care in the world for their own welfare. Paul Ince A bloodied Paul Ince leads England to World Cup qualification Credit: Getty Images  The Guvernor's finest hour in an England shirt. Battered, bruised and very bloodied, Ince fought back from a nasty head clash to lead England to a crucial goalless draw in Italy, securing qualification to World Cup 1998 in the process. “I remember coming off and the doctor said it would take half an hour to put the stitches in,” said Ince, who was also captain that night. “I wasn’t thinking at all about the cut, I was just thinking about getting back on the pitch. I didn’t want to leave us down to 10 men." Inspiring stuff. Marouane Fellaini Marouane Fellaini battles on with an unorthodox head dressing  Credit: Getty images  A more modern day take on the classic look. Despite Fellaini's dense lock of curls, the Belgian midfielder sustained a cut on his forehead in an aerial clash with Real Madrid defender, Sergio Ramos, during Manchester United's Super Cup defeat to Real Madrid earlier this season.  Manchester United medics were forced to improvise with a reinforced bandage to stem the flow of blood and keep the Belgian's afro in check. The result was John McEnroe-esque masterpiece.  Giorgio Chiellini  Giorgio Chiellini has his head wrapped with a blue bandage  Credit: AP  A player very much cut from the same warrior-defender mould as our own Terry Butcher.  Giorgio Chiellini required eight stitches after colliding with Olympiacios' Bjorn Engels earlier this season, but played on to ensure Juventus got their Champions League campaign off to a winning start. “I’ve got three points on the field and eight stitches in my head," said Chiellini in an Instagram post after the match. "All that counted tonight was the win. Let’s carry on like this." Vedran Corluka  Vedran Corluka sporting some unorthodox head-wear  Credit: EPA  Former Tottenham defender Vedran Corluka required medical attention on four separate occasions after sustaining a nasty head gash in Croatia's Euro 2016 opener against Turkey. A Luka Modric volley handed the Croatians victory against Turkey but it was Corluka's bizarre headwear which will live longest in the memory. After initially having his head wrapped in conventional bandaging, the right-back was forced to improved when the cut re-opened in a clash later on in the game. Corluka returned to the pitch sporting a blue and red swimming hat to keep the dressing in place.

Who wore it best? A brief history of footballers in bandages 

Gary Cahill became the talk of Twitter on Wednesday evening after sporting one of the strangest bandage-ensembles ever seen on a football pitch.  28 years after Terry Butcher famously left the field of play with his white kit almost entirely dyed red with blood from head wound, another England centre-back joined the long a list of bandaged footballers to battle on despite a significant head injury. After taking a blow to the chin, Cahill left the field for medical treatment before returning with strapping that stretched from the top of his head all the way around his face to the bottom to his chin. A bandaged-up Gary Cahill battles on at Stamford Bridge Credit: Getty Images  Here are just a few exceptional examples of bandaged-up footballers playing on without a care in the world for their own welfare. Paul Ince A bloodied Paul Ince leads England to World Cup qualification Credit: Getty Images  The Guvernor's finest hour in an England shirt. Battered, bruised and very bloodied, Ince fought back from a nasty head clash to lead England to a crucial goalless draw in Italy, securing qualification to World Cup 1998 in the process. “I remember coming off and the doctor said it would take half an hour to put the stitches in,” said Ince, who was also captain that night. “I wasn’t thinking at all about the cut, I was just thinking about getting back on the pitch. I didn’t want to leave us down to 10 men." Inspiring stuff. Marouane Fellaini Marouane Fellaini battles on with an unorthodox head dressing  Credit: Getty images  A more modern day take on the classic look. Despite Fellaini's dense lock of curls, the Belgian midfielder sustained a cut on his forehead in an aerial clash with Real Madrid defender, Sergio Ramos, during Manchester United's Super Cup defeat to Real Madrid earlier this season.  Manchester United medics were forced to improvise with a reinforced bandage to stem the flow of blood and keep the Belgian's afro in check. The result was John McEnroe-esque masterpiece.  Giorgio Chiellini  Giorgio Chiellini has his head wrapped with a blue bandage  Credit: AP  A player very much cut from the same warrior-defender mould as our own Terry Butcher.  Giorgio Chiellini required eight stitches after colliding with Olympiacios' Bjorn Engels earlier this season, but played on to ensure Juventus got their Champions League campaign off to a winning start. “I’ve got three points on the field and eight stitches in my head," said Chiellini in an Instagram post after the match. "All that counted tonight was the win. Let’s carry on like this." Vedran Corluka  Vedran Corluka sporting some unorthodox head-wear  Credit: EPA  Former Tottenham defender Vedran Corluka required medical attention on four separate occasions after sustaining a nasty head gash in Croatia's Euro 2016 opener against Turkey. A Luka Modric volley handed the Croatians victory against Turkey but it was Corluka's bizarre headwear which will live longest in the memory. After initially having his head wrapped in conventional bandaging, the right-back was forced to improved when the cut re-opened in a clash later on in the game. Corluka returned to the pitch sporting a blue and red swimming hat to keep the dressing in place.

How Prince Harry is creating the next generation of coaches

Five years after he had watched the Olympic closing ceremony there, Prince Harry was back at the London Stadium. This time he and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were at the graduation ceremony of the latest bunch of apprentices from Coach Core, the organisation the Princes had established to create a whole new generation of sports coaches. It was, Harry said, the most appropriate place he could be. Because it was on that occasion, watching the end of London 2012, that he and his brother had come up with an idea that they felt would provide a tangible, lasting Olympic legacy. “We believe our graduates are the future of coaching,” he said in a speech delivered from a podium which had been built roughly where Usain Bolt crossed the line to win the 100 metres in 2012. “We believe they are not just great coaches, but great mentors and great leaders of their community.” Watching him speak were some of the 250 young people who have gone through the intensive, year-long apprenticeship programme. People like 18-year-old Alisha Wilson, now working as a full-time swimming coach in Glasgow after graduating in June. Or 19-year-old Muhammed Mumin, who spent a year on Coach Core before heading off to college to study business. Or Andre Nathaniel-George, an 18-year-old from Harrow, who is now working as a tennis coach for the London school sports charity Greenhouse.  Prince Harry attended a ceremony for 250 young graduates at the London Stadium on Wednesday along with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images “It’s been amazing,” he said of the course. “It’s not just the people who you coach who benefit from this. I’ve learned so much about myself. I’ve become so much more confident, more outgoing. In all honesty, I don’t reckon I’d have been able to stand here and talk to you a year ago.” The statistics Harry delivered about the programme are impressive indeed. 98 per cent of Coach Core graduates are now in employment or further education, 80 per cent are still engaged in coaching six months after graduating. But the Princes’ purpose in setting up the scheme was not simply to create an employment pathway. They wanted to change the way in which coaching is learned, to ensure that their graduates were as versed in psychology as they were in the technical aspects of their sport. In an era when an England football coach can be sacked for inappropriate behaviour and a Paralympic swimming coach removed from his position for systematic bullying, it is clear there is work to be done. The Duchess of Cambridge with some of the scheme's graduates Credit: Getty images To that end, Coach Core involved elite coaches, asking them to mentor those on the programme. And on the day of the graduation, the London Stadium was given over to sessions being led by Will Greenwood, Judy Murray, Mark Hunter and Max Whitlock. Though in truth some of those taking part were more interested in getting a selfie with West Ham’s Mark Noble and Javier Hernandez, who, along with their manager Slaven Bilic, were interested bystanders, than they were in throwing a rugby ball around with Greenwood. As he watched the sessions unfold, Scott Hann, the coach who had progressed Whitlock from a young hopeful to a double Olympic and world champion gymnast, was particularly impressed by the Coach Core philosophy. “I’ve seen so many kids damaged by bad coaching,” he said. “The scariest quote I ever heard was that an athlete should be more scared of their coach than of the skill they need to learn, that way they won’t be frightened of learning the skill. When I was first a coach it was the received wisdom. And then we wonder why we didn’t produce a gold medallist before Max.” West Ham's Javier Hernandez, Mark Noble and Slaven Bilic meet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images Greenwood too insisted that no-one ever improves as a sports person by being shouted at. “I played under a coach who was literally purple with rage every time we went into the dressing room at half time,” he said. “He’d spray the walls with rage. Did it make me a better player? No. Did it makes us a better team? Of course not.” Meanwhile, as the royal party joined in the groups, throwing themselves into Judy Murray’s tennis game with particular gusto, Prince William was asked what he believed was the most important thing a coach needs to do. “Listen,” he said. It was sound advice.

How Prince Harry is creating the next generation of coaches

Five years after he had watched the Olympic closing ceremony there, Prince Harry was back at the London Stadium. This time he and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were at the graduation ceremony of the latest bunch of apprentices from Coach Core, the organisation the Princes had established to create a whole new generation of sports coaches. It was, Harry said, the most appropriate place he could be. Because it was on that occasion, watching the end of London 2012, that he and his brother had come up with an idea that they felt would provide a tangible, lasting Olympic legacy. “We believe our graduates are the future of coaching,” he said in a speech delivered from a podium which had been built roughly where Usain Bolt crossed the line to win the 100 metres in 2012. “We believe they are not just great coaches, but great mentors and great leaders of their community.” Watching him speak were some of the 250 young people who have gone through the intensive, year-long apprenticeship programme. People like 18-year-old Alisha Wilson, now working as a full-time swimming coach in Glasgow after graduating in June. Or 19-year-old Muhammed Mumin, who spent a year on Coach Core before heading off to college to study business. Or Andre Nathaniel-George, an 18-year-old from Harrow, who is now working as a tennis coach for the London school sports charity Greenhouse.  Prince Harry attended a ceremony for 250 young graduates at the London Stadium on Wednesday along with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images “It’s been amazing,” he said of the course. “It’s not just the people who you coach who benefit from this. I’ve learned so much about myself. I’ve become so much more confident, more outgoing. In all honesty, I don’t reckon I’d have been able to stand here and talk to you a year ago.” The statistics Harry delivered about the programme are impressive indeed. 98 per cent of Coach Core graduates are now in employment or further education, 80 per cent are still engaged in coaching six months after graduating. But the Princes’ purpose in setting up the scheme was not simply to create an employment pathway. They wanted to change the way in which coaching is learned, to ensure that their graduates were as versed in psychology as they were in the technical aspects of their sport. In an era when an England football coach can be sacked for inappropriate behaviour and a Paralympic swimming coach removed from his position for systematic bullying, it is clear there is work to be done. The Duchess of Cambridge with some of the scheme's graduates Credit: Getty images To that end, Coach Core involved elite coaches, asking them to mentor those on the programme. And on the day of the graduation, the London Stadium was given over to sessions being led by Will Greenwood, Judy Murray, Mark Hunter and Max Whitlock. Though in truth some of those taking part were more interested in getting a selfie with West Ham’s Mark Noble and Javier Hernandez, who, along with their manager Slaven Bilic, were interested bystanders, than they were in throwing a rugby ball around with Greenwood. As he watched the sessions unfold, Scott Hann, the coach who had progressed Whitlock from a young hopeful to a double Olympic and world champion gymnast, was particularly impressed by the Coach Core philosophy. “I’ve seen so many kids damaged by bad coaching,” he said. “The scariest quote I ever heard was that an athlete should be more scared of their coach than of the skill they need to learn, that way they won’t be frightened of learning the skill. When I was first a coach it was the received wisdom. And then we wonder why we didn’t produce a gold medallist before Max.” West Ham's Javier Hernandez, Mark Noble and Slaven Bilic meet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images Greenwood too insisted that no-one ever improves as a sports person by being shouted at. “I played under a coach who was literally purple with rage every time we went into the dressing room at half time,” he said. “He’d spray the walls with rage. Did it make me a better player? No. Did it makes us a better team? Of course not.” Meanwhile, as the royal party joined in the groups, throwing themselves into Judy Murray’s tennis game with particular gusto, Prince William was asked what he believed was the most important thing a coach needs to do. “Listen,” he said. It was sound advice.

How Prince Harry is creating the next generation of coaches

Five years after he had watched the Olympic closing ceremony there, Prince Harry was back at the London Stadium. This time he and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were at the graduation ceremony of the latest bunch of apprentices from Coach Core, the organisation the Princes had established to create a whole new generation of sports coaches. It was, Harry said, the most appropriate place he could be. Because it was on that occasion, watching the end of London 2012, that he and his brother had come up with an idea that they felt would provide a tangible, lasting Olympic legacy. “We believe our graduates are the future of coaching,” he said in a speech delivered from a podium which had been built roughly where Usain Bolt crossed the line to win the 100 metres in 2012. “We believe they are not just great coaches, but great mentors and great leaders of their community.” Watching him speak were some of the 250 young people who have gone through the intensive, year-long apprenticeship programme. People like 18-year-old Alisha Wilson, now working as a full-time swimming coach in Glasgow after graduating in June. Or 19-year-old Muhammed Mumin, who spent a year on Coach Core before heading off to college to study business. Or Andre Nathaniel-George, an 18-year-old from Harrow, who is now working as a tennis coach for the London school sports charity Greenhouse.  Prince Harry attended a ceremony for 250 young graduates at the London Stadium on Wednesday along with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images “It’s been amazing,” he said of the course. “It’s not just the people who you coach who benefit from this. I’ve learned so much about myself. I’ve become so much more confident, more outgoing. In all honesty, I don’t reckon I’d have been able to stand here and talk to you a year ago.” The statistics Harry delivered about the programme are impressive indeed. 98 per cent of Coach Core graduates are now in employment or further education, 80 per cent are still engaged in coaching six months after graduating. But the Princes’ purpose in setting up the scheme was not simply to create an employment pathway. They wanted to change the way in which coaching is learned, to ensure that their graduates were as versed in psychology as they were in the technical aspects of their sport. In an era when an England football coach can be sacked for inappropriate behaviour and a Paralympic swimming coach removed from his position for systematic bullying, it is clear there is work to be done. The Duchess of Cambridge with some of the scheme's graduates Credit: Getty images To that end, Coach Core involved elite coaches, asking them to mentor those on the programme. And on the day of the graduation, the London Stadium was given over to sessions being led by Will Greenwood, Judy Murray, Mark Hunter and Max Whitlock. Though in truth some of those taking part were more interested in getting a selfie with West Ham’s Mark Noble and Javier Hernandez, who, along with their manager Slaven Bilic, were interested bystanders, than they were in throwing a rugby ball around with Greenwood. As he watched the sessions unfold, Scott Hann, the coach who had progressed Whitlock from a young hopeful to a double Olympic and world champion gymnast, was particularly impressed by the Coach Core philosophy. “I’ve seen so many kids damaged by bad coaching,” he said. “The scariest quote I ever heard was that an athlete should be more scared of their coach than of the skill they need to learn, that way they won’t be frightened of learning the skill. When I was first a coach it was the received wisdom. And then we wonder why we didn’t produce a gold medallist before Max.” West Ham's Javier Hernandez, Mark Noble and Slaven Bilic meet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images Greenwood too insisted that no-one ever improves as a sports person by being shouted at. “I played under a coach who was literally purple with rage every time we went into the dressing room at half time,” he said. “He’d spray the walls with rage. Did it make me a better player? No. Did it makes us a better team? Of course not.” Meanwhile, as the royal party joined in the groups, throwing themselves into Judy Murray’s tennis game with particular gusto, Prince William was asked what he believed was the most important thing a coach needs to do. “Listen,” he said. It was sound advice.

How Prince Harry is creating the next generation of coaches

Five years after he had watched the Olympic closing ceremony there, Prince Harry was back at the London Stadium. This time he and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were at the graduation ceremony of the latest bunch of apprentices from Coach Core, the organisation the Princes had established to create a whole new generation of sports coaches. It was, Harry said, the most appropriate place he could be. Because it was on that occasion, watching the end of London 2012, that he and his brother had come up with an idea that they felt would provide a tangible, lasting Olympic legacy. “We believe our graduates are the future of coaching,” he said in a speech delivered from a podium which had been built roughly where Usain Bolt crossed the line to win the 100 metres in 2012. “We believe they are not just great coaches, but great mentors and great leaders of their community.” Watching him speak were some of the 250 young people who have gone through the intensive, year-long apprenticeship programme. People like 18-year-old Alisha Wilson, now working as a full-time swimming coach in Glasgow after graduating in June. Or 19-year-old Muhammed Mumin, who spent a year on Coach Core before heading off to college to study business. Or Andre Nathaniel-George, an 18-year-old from Harrow, who is now working as a tennis coach for the London school sports charity Greenhouse.  Prince Harry attended a ceremony for 250 young graduates at the London Stadium on Wednesday along with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images “It’s been amazing,” he said of the course. “It’s not just the people who you coach who benefit from this. I’ve learned so much about myself. I’ve become so much more confident, more outgoing. In all honesty, I don’t reckon I’d have been able to stand here and talk to you a year ago.” The statistics Harry delivered about the programme are impressive indeed. 98 per cent of Coach Core graduates are now in employment or further education, 80 per cent are still engaged in coaching six months after graduating. But the Princes’ purpose in setting up the scheme was not simply to create an employment pathway. They wanted to change the way in which coaching is learned, to ensure that their graduates were as versed in psychology as they were in the technical aspects of their sport. In an era when an England football coach can be sacked for inappropriate behaviour and a Paralympic swimming coach removed from his position for systematic bullying, it is clear there is work to be done. The Duchess of Cambridge with some of the scheme's graduates Credit: Getty images To that end, Coach Core involved elite coaches, asking them to mentor those on the programme. And on the day of the graduation, the London Stadium was given over to sessions being led by Will Greenwood, Judy Murray, Mark Hunter and Max Whitlock. Though in truth some of those taking part were more interested in getting a selfie with West Ham’s Mark Noble and Javier Hernandez, who, along with their manager Slaven Bilic, were interested bystanders, than they were in throwing a rugby ball around with Greenwood. As he watched the sessions unfold, Scott Hann, the coach who had progressed Whitlock from a young hopeful to a double Olympic and world champion gymnast, was particularly impressed by the Coach Core philosophy. “I’ve seen so many kids damaged by bad coaching,” he said. “The scariest quote I ever heard was that an athlete should be more scared of their coach than of the skill they need to learn, that way they won’t be frightened of learning the skill. When I was first a coach it was the received wisdom. And then we wonder why we didn’t produce a gold medallist before Max.” West Ham's Javier Hernandez, Mark Noble and Slaven Bilic meet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Credit: Getty images Greenwood too insisted that no-one ever improves as a sports person by being shouted at. “I played under a coach who was literally purple with rage every time we went into the dressing room at half time,” he said. “He’d spray the walls with rage. Did it make me a better player? No. Did it makes us a better team? Of course not.” Meanwhile, as the royal party joined in the groups, throwing themselves into Judy Murray’s tennis game with particular gusto, Prince William was asked what he believed was the most important thing a coach needs to do. “Listen,” he said. It was sound advice.

Catching the Bass We're Swimming With

Kyle and Kobie found a massive school of smallmouth bass while out scuba filming underwater video for Wired2Fish projects. Kobie works a lure in front of the fish.

Catching the Bass We're Swimming With

Kyle and Kobie found a massive school of smallmouth bass while out scuba filming underwater video for Wired2Fish projects. Kobie works a lure in front of the fish.

Catching the Bass We're Swimming With

Kyle and Kobie found a massive school of smallmouth bass while out scuba filming underwater video for Wired2Fish projects. Kobie works a lure in front of the fish.

Catching the Bass We're Swimming With

Kyle and Kobie found a massive school of smallmouth bass while out scuba filming underwater video for Wired2Fish projects. Kobie works a lure in front of the fish.

GB para-swimming coach left police after ‘mocking disabled person’

GB para-swimming coach left police after ‘mocking disabled person’

Rob Greenwood left the police in 2002 after allegations he made fun of a disabled person.

GB para-swimming coach left police after ‘mocking disabled person’

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

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Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

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Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

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Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

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Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

The Best New Workout Gear for Fall 2017

As the cooler temperatures and shorter days arrive at the end of the year, we find ourselves switching from our standard summertime workouts to new routines made for the fall season. From relishing every crisp, autumn morning run to taking yoga or interval sessions inside, fall is the perfect time for transition. It’s also a great time to change up your workout wardrobe and treat yourself to some new items.

SI editors rounded up their favorite new fitness gear out this fall, from new running sneakers to workout-ready jackets and updated technology, so you can sweat your way through the season in style.

Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain

Adidas is back at it again with a new iteration in their ever-popular UltraBoost line with the Adidas UltraBoost All Terrain. With fall in full swing and winter right around the corner, be prepared to run no matter what Mother Nature throws at you. The primeknit upper has an ultra-thin protective layer to repel water, so you can take these Boosts in any weather conditions. The high, knit collar gives you that sock-like fit while keeping your ankles warm for when it’s cold out, and there’s also a more flexible and durable outsole to give you better traction in wet conditions. —Allen Kim

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $220. Also available in women’s.

Brooks Levitate

As a longtime wearer and lover of the Brooks Glycerin, it takes a lot for another shoe to make its way into my rotation. But when I first slid my foot into Brooks’ newest performance running shoe, the Levitate, I knew within minutes that this shoe was a game-changer.

The Levitate was developed with Brooks’ newest midsole technology called DNA AMP, which delivers an impressive amount of energy return, creating a springy yet stable ride for the runner. For me, this shoe is perfect for quicker, shorter runs. Also, this technology has been in the making for seven years, which has to count for something. Every aspect of this shoe was thoughtfully designed with the runner in mind. The shoe’s upper is made of a flexible ‘Fit Knit’ which wraps the foot to provide a snug fit without being restricting. The laces have just the right amount of elasticity to give the runner the perfect knot, and the padded collar around the ankle only adds to the comfort level. And—obviously very important—the shoes look cool! From the silver color lining the side of the sole to the offered colors, this shoe does not lack the design factor.

I’ve run about 20 miles wearing these shoes, and like I mentioned before, the Levitate is the ideal partner to my beloved Glycerins in my shoe rotation. The Levitate feels springy and light with a flatter ride—which is perfect for shorter runs while still providing me the cushion that my legs are so used to.

If wearing the Glycerin is like walking on clouds, the Levitate is like wearing flexible comfortable springboards on your feet, and it’s the perfect compliment to my collection of Glycerins. And the perfect addition to your shoe closet this fall. —Bette Marston

Available at brooksrunning.com, zappos.com, dickssportinggoods.com, nordstrom.com, $150

Nike Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket

Don’t let a little rain keep you from running outside — Nike has you covered with their Zonal Aeroshield Hooded Jacket. The hood has a brim with toggles to lock in to keep your head covered, and there are also has zippered, waterproof pockets to store all of your valuables and keep them dry. This lightweight jacket has targeted ventilation to allow for maximum breathability along with a back vent for airflow, so you can stay dry without sweating up a storm. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $175

?

Reebok Floatride

Reebok is typically not the first brand that comes to mind for running shoes, but the Reebok Floatride promises a lightweight, cushioned shoe for longer distances. My first impression of the neutral sneaker was based on the look and feeling of the shoe in my hands: the no-tongue style with caged lacing and overall minimalist look immediately caught my eye, in a good way. Since the tongue is attached to the knit of the shoe, you have to pull on the upper part to slip your foot in. (A note on sizing: For an "optimal performance fit," Reebok recommends ordering a half size down. I usually wear a womens size 8.5 and tested an 8.5, but for longer runs, I think I'd prefer a half size small for a more snug fit.)

The Floatrides do not need to be broken-in and the cushioning beneath your feet can be felt immediately—the shoe is one of the squishy-est and softest I've tried. For someone who prefers a shoe with more stability for longer runs, I did feel comfortable in this for a 4-mile run, and in the gym, I felt springy running intervals on the treadmill. Overall, the Floatride looked and felt good on my feet and I plan to add it to my rotation this fall, be it treadmill work and exercises at the gym or a low-mileage day in my 15K training. — Jamie Lisanti

Available at reebok.com, $150

?

Adidas Dame 4

Damian Lillard’s latest signature shoe is his best yet. Adidas really stepped its game up with the design for the Dame 4, and we’ll go as far as to call it a contender for the best-looking basketball kicks to come out this year.

With a bouncy midsole to keep you going all day long, a ventilated mesh upper to make sure your feet stay cool and grooves patterned in the outsole so you can stop on a dime, these are the basketball kicks to pick up this fall. For only $115, you’re getting a steal with the Dame 4. Don’t sleep on this one. — A.K.

Available at adidas.com, footlocker.com, finishline.com, $115

The North Face Campshire Full Zip Fleece

OK, so this isn’t exactly your typical workout gear. But this comfy, cozy fleece zip-up is the perfect post-workout item for the fall. I love it after a morning run or evening run on a chilly day. I typically soak through my long sleeve or tank top and find myself wanting to change—and bundle up—after logging some miles on the mountain or in the park. This zip-up is easy to throw on after a workout, or just when you’re headed out for a day of outdoor fall activities. It is so soft, you’ll want one in blanket form. — J.L.

Available at thenorthface.com, dickssportinggoods.com, $129. Also available in women’s hoodie.

?

Nike Zoom Fly

Whether you’re training for the big day or need to hit your PR on race day, the Nike Zoom Fly is one of their fastest and most cushioned running shoes available.

Nike used their tried-and-true Lunarlon foam in the midsole to give you a soft ride, and the high stack offers more space between your feet and the ground to make sure your feet are cushioned for those long runs. They also added a full-length carbon infused nylon plate to really help you take things into high gear, so you’ll be flying past everyone around you. — A.K.

Available at nike.com, $150

?

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s new iteration of the Apple Watch arrived in Sept. with lots of big changes for active users looking to use the technology while running, biking, swimming, surfing, snowboarding and more. The most noteworthy change is the addition of built-in cellular service that connects to your iPhone number—that means you can run with only the watch and leave your phone in the car or at home, but still stay connected during your workout. That means listening to music, answering texts and calls and using GPS can all be done without your smartphone in hand. (The Apple Watch with built-in cellular starts at $399, while the one without is $329.)

While I was impressed by the updated cellular feature—something my Series 2 watch does not have—the new iteration will also have an updated Heart Rate app and workout app and more. If you haven’t gotten an Apple Watch yet, the new Series 3 version is a perfect opportunity to hop onboard. — J.L.

Available at apple.com, target.com, dickssportinggoods.com, kohls.com, $329

British swimming scandal shows the risk when duty of care is neglected in pursuit of glory 

British swimming scandal shows the risk when duty of care is neglected in pursuit of glory 

British swimming scandal shows the risk when duty of care is neglected in pursuit of glory 

What Two Aspiring Amateurs Learned From Training With Pro Triathlete Jesse Thomas

Jesse Thomas just wants to be happy. He thinks you should be happy, too.

He’ll be lining up in Kona, Hawaii, to race in his second Ironman World Championship on Oct. 14. Last year he showed up at the start line burned out, with a fatigue that had crept up on him in the last few weeks of training. He finished No. 16, 23 minutes behind winner Jan Frodeno. This year, he took almost two weeks off training in June. He kicked back a little, drank the occasional beer. A foot injury even helped by slowing down his ramp back up to full workouts.

Thomas juggles being a pro athlete with running the energy bar company he co-founded called Picky Bars, and raising his family—he and his wife, Lauren Fleshman, have a four-year-old son, Jude, and Fleshman gave birth to their daughter, Zadie, on Monday. In August, he hosted two aspiring amateur triathletes over separate weekends in his hometown of Bend, Ore., giving them a window into both his workouts and his life. Luis Iturralde, 32, a structural engineer from New Orleans, and Kyle Klinger, 36, a sales and marketing executive from Austin got to train with Thomas as their prize for winning competitions run by Red Bull and Strava. Listen to yourself, he told them.

In triathlon, Thomas says, “The line is so much more blurred than it is in conventional sports.” When he tells people he’s a pro triathlete, their response is usually OK, yeah, cool. So what do you do for your job?

Almost everyone starts out swimming, biking, and running with the goal of getting in shape, although Thomas, who raced the 3,000-meter steeplechase as a student at Stanford, had always dreamed of going pro in something. The biggest step up towards pro status, he says, came when he hired his coach, Matt Dixon, in 2010.

“If you want to be a better triathlete, hire a good coach and don’t be doing it on your own," Thomas says. "I think it’s really hard to separate ego from smart decision making in the training environment.” (Fleshman is also a two-time national champion 5,000-meter runner, so Thomas can lean on her athletic experience, too.)

According to Thomas, triathletes also often lose sight of what really matters, chasing numbers collected by all sorts of wearable devices—heart rate, power, speed, etc.—instead. “[Data] matters to me,” he says, “but it’s not the be all end all.” Thomas pays attention to his mind and body to inform how he needs to moderate his training or nutrition. “The more sophisticated an athlete you become,” he says, “the better you are at understanding what those feelings mean and placing value on them.”

“When I start to get over trained, I get angry,” he says. “If I’m heading out for a ride and I can’t find my shoes or something, I’ll throw a temper tantrum like I’m a three year old.”

The solution is always to back off. Maybe he needs to ride shorter or easier, doesn’t need to set a new fastest time. Maybe he needs to skip that training session entirely. Perhaps he should find a quiet space and meditate instead. In contrast, amateurs often don’t feel they have the luxury to do that. There already don’t seem to be enough hours in the day to catch up with all of the demands of life. “When I’m not working I’m training,” Klinger says, “and when I’m not training I’m working.”

In six years as a pro, Thomas has learned to take his easy days easier and that rest means rest. The second morning Iturralde was in Bend, he woke up early to go running with Thomas. As he sipped his second cup of coffee, Iturralde wondered where his host was. Thomas was still fast asleep. He often doesn’t set an alarm. Instead he wakes up when his body is ready. “Sleeping and eating well, those are just as important as putting the work in,” Iturralde says he realized in Bend.

Thomas won his final warm-up race ahead of Kona, Ironman 70.3 Augusta on Sep. 24. Three weeks of rest and recovery later he’ll be aiming for a top 10 finish in Hawaii. Maybe more than any numbers, the difference that elevates the six-time Wildflower Triathlon champion and two-time father to his goal will be happiness.

What Two Aspiring Amateurs Learned From Training With Pro Triathlete Jesse Thomas

Jesse Thomas just wants to be happy. He thinks you should be happy, too.

He’ll be lining up in Kona, Hawaii, to race in his second Ironman World Championship on Oct. 14. Last year he showed up at the start line burned out, with a fatigue that had crept up on him in the last few weeks of training. He finished No. 16, 23 minutes behind winner Jan Frodeno. This year, he took almost two weeks off training in June. He kicked back a little, drank the occasional beer. A foot injury even helped by slowing down his ramp back up to full workouts.

Thomas juggles being a pro athlete with running the energy bar company he co-founded called Picky Bars, and raising his family—he and his wife, Lauren Fleshman, have a four-year-old son, Jude, and Fleshman gave birth to their daughter, Zadie, on Monday. In August, he hosted two aspiring amateur triathletes over separate weekends in his hometown of Bend, Ore., giving them a window into both his workouts and his life. Luis Iturralde, 32, a structural engineer from New Orleans, and Kyle Klinger, 36, a sales and marketing executive from Austin got to train with Thomas as their prize for winning competitions run by Red Bull and Strava. Listen to yourself, he told them.

In triathlon, Thomas says, “The line is so much more blurred than it is in conventional sports.” When he tells people he’s a pro triathlete, their response is usually OK, yeah, cool. So what do you do for your job?

Almost everyone starts out swimming, biking, and running with the goal of getting in shape, although Thomas, who raced the 3,000-meter steeplechase as a student at Stanford, had always dreamed of going pro in something. The biggest step up towards pro status, he says, came when he hired his coach, Matt Dixon, in 2010.

“If you want to be a better triathlete, hire a good coach and don’t be doing it on your own," Thomas says. "I think it’s really hard to separate ego from smart decision making in the training environment.” (Fleshman is also a two-time national champion 5,000-meter runner, so Thomas can lean on her athletic experience, too.)

According to Thomas, triathletes also often lose sight of what really matters, chasing numbers collected by all sorts of wearable devices—heart rate, power, speed, etc.—instead. “[Data] matters to me,” he says, “but it’s not the be all end all.” Thomas pays attention to his mind and body to inform how he needs to moderate his training or nutrition. “The more sophisticated an athlete you become,” he says, “the better you are at understanding what those feelings mean and placing value on them.”

“When I start to get over trained, I get angry,” he says. “If I’m heading out for a ride and I can’t find my shoes or something, I’ll throw a temper tantrum like I’m a three year old.”

The solution is always to back off. Maybe he needs to ride shorter or easier, doesn’t need to set a new fastest time. Maybe he needs to skip that training session entirely. Perhaps he should find a quiet space and meditate instead. In contrast, amateurs often don’t feel they have the luxury to do that. There already don’t seem to be enough hours in the day to catch up with all of the demands of life. “When I’m not working I’m training,” Klinger says, “and when I’m not training I’m working.”

In six years as a pro, Thomas has learned to take his easy days easier and that rest means rest. The second morning Iturralde was in Bend, he woke up early to go running with Thomas. As he sipped his second cup of coffee, Iturralde wondered where his host was. Thomas was still fast asleep. He often doesn’t set an alarm. Instead he wakes up when his body is ready. “Sleeping and eating well, those are just as important as putting the work in,” Iturralde says he realized in Bend.

Thomas won his final warm-up race ahead of Kona, Ironman 70.3 Augusta on Sep. 24. Three weeks of rest and recovery later he’ll be aiming for a top 10 finish in Hawaii. Maybe more than any numbers, the difference that elevates the six-time Wildflower Triathlon champion and two-time father to his goal will be happiness.

What Two Aspiring Amateurs Learned From Training With Pro Triathlete Jesse Thomas

Jesse Thomas just wants to be happy. He thinks you should be happy, too.

He’ll be lining up in Kona, Hawaii, to race in his second Ironman World Championship on Oct. 14. Last year he showed up at the start line burned out, with a fatigue that had crept up on him in the last few weeks of training. He finished No. 16, 23 minutes behind winner Jan Frodeno. This year, he took almost two weeks off training in June. He kicked back a little, drank the occasional beer. A foot injury even helped by slowing down his ramp back up to full workouts.

Thomas juggles being a pro athlete with running the energy bar company he co-founded called Picky Bars, and raising his family—he and his wife, Lauren Fleshman, have a four-year-old son, Jude, and Fleshman gave birth to their daughter, Zadie, on Monday. In August, he hosted two aspiring amateur triathletes over separate weekends in his hometown of Bend, Ore., giving them a window into both his workouts and his life. Luis Iturralde, 32, a structural engineer from New Orleans, and Kyle Klinger, 36, a sales and marketing executive from Austin got to train with Thomas as their prize for winning competitions run by Red Bull and Strava. Listen to yourself, he told them.

In triathlon, Thomas says, “The line is so much more blurred than it is in conventional sports.” When he tells people he’s a pro triathlete, their response is usually OK, yeah, cool. So what do you do for your job?

Almost everyone starts out swimming, biking, and running with the goal of getting in shape, although Thomas, who raced the 3,000-meter steeplechase as a student at Stanford, had always dreamed of going pro in something. The biggest step up towards pro status, he says, came when he hired his coach, Matt Dixon, in 2010.

“If you want to be a better triathlete, hire a good coach and don’t be doing it on your own," Thomas says. "I think it’s really hard to separate ego from smart decision making in the training environment.” (Fleshman is also a two-time national champion 5,000-meter runner, so Thomas can lean on her athletic experience, too.)

According to Thomas, triathletes also often lose sight of what really matters, chasing numbers collected by all sorts of wearable devices—heart rate, power, speed, etc.—instead. “[Data] matters to me,” he says, “but it’s not the be all end all.” Thomas pays attention to his mind and body to inform how he needs to moderate his training or nutrition. “The more sophisticated an athlete you become,” he says, “the better you are at understanding what those feelings mean and placing value on them.”

“When I start to get over trained, I get angry,” he says. “If I’m heading out for a ride and I can’t find my shoes or something, I’ll throw a temper tantrum like I’m a three year old.”

The solution is always to back off. Maybe he needs to ride shorter or easier, doesn’t need to set a new fastest time. Maybe he needs to skip that training session entirely. Perhaps he should find a quiet space and meditate instead. In contrast, amateurs often don’t feel they have the luxury to do that. There already don’t seem to be enough hours in the day to catch up with all of the demands of life. “When I’m not working I’m training,” Klinger says, “and when I’m not training I’m working.”

In six years as a pro, Thomas has learned to take his easy days easier and that rest means rest. The second morning Iturralde was in Bend, he woke up early to go running with Thomas. As he sipped his second cup of coffee, Iturralde wondered where his host was. Thomas was still fast asleep. He often doesn’t set an alarm. Instead he wakes up when his body is ready. “Sleeping and eating well, those are just as important as putting the work in,” Iturralde says he realized in Bend.

Thomas won his final warm-up race ahead of Kona, Ironman 70.3 Augusta on Sep. 24. Three weeks of rest and recovery later he’ll be aiming for a top 10 finish in Hawaii. Maybe more than any numbers, the difference that elevates the six-time Wildflower Triathlon champion and two-time father to his goal will be happiness.

The Diamondbacks Had Mounted Police Guard Their Pool From the Dodgers

The last time the Dodgers had something to celebrate at Chase Field they jumped in the pool in centerfield and everyone associated with the Diamondbacks threw a hissy fit. “I thought [they] were classier than that,” Willie Bloomquist said.

When L.A. swept the D-Backs on Monday night, Arizona made sure that Yasiel Puig wasn’t going to be able to take a celebratory dip.

Not only were the cops stationed out there, they stayed at their posts for a long, long time. Check out the timestamps on these tweets.

The dumb thing is, the mounties didn’t even really have to be there. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said the day before that there was no way his players were going for another swim.

“That won’t happen,” Roberts said. “This is a completely different team and I think we have bigger goals than to jump into a swimming pool.”

Too bad, it would have been a ton of fun.

Bellinger, Dodgers beat D-backs 3-1 to return to NLCS

Law enforcement officers guard the swimming pool in right field after game 3 of baseball's National League Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. The Los Angeles Dodgers swept the Arizona Diamondbacks to advance to the National League Championship Series. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Law enforcement officers guard the swimming pool in right field after game 3 of baseball's National League Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. The Los Angeles Dodgers swept the Arizona Diamondbacks to advance to the National League Championship Series. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Welcome to the clean but rustic ForRestMix - England's World Cup hotel

Vladimir Lenin once hid from the Tsarist police in this sleepy seaside village on the northern outskirts of St Petersburg, and the famous artist Ilya Repin – after whom it was later renamed – sheltered here from the commotion of what was then the Russian capital. England’s football team will also avoid the hustle and bustle of the city of five million when they stay in Repino during the 2018 World Cup in Russia. But their choice of lodgings, the clean but rustic ForRestMix hotel, has raised eyebrows. “ForRestMix? They could have found themselves something better,” said Dmitry, the proprietor of a small shooting gallery with a portrait of Lenin on the wall. “There are lots in the city. The Astoria or the Grand Hotel Europe,” he added, referring to two five-star hotels in St Petersburg’s historic centre. “Even our national team don’t stay in such places when they travel. It’s simple, nothing special.” He noted that the Residence Hotel and Spa, a renovated Soviet complex built on the site where communist writer Maxim Gorky briefly took refuge, was considered the top accommodation in Repino, although it only has 60 rooms compared to the 107 in the ForRestMix. The hotel's swimming pool England qualified for the World Cup by beating Slovenia at Wembley on Thursday – and manager Gareth Southgate has reportedly already chosen ForRestMix as the team’s base and even been to inspect the facility. The hotel has a number of advantages. It is just six miles from Zelenogorsk, where the Three Lions will train at a complex being built for Russia’s youth Olympic reserve team. It is a good thing they are not training at the hotel, which has only two child-size goalposts on its grounds. While it is on the other side of St Petersburg from the airport, the new highway that cuts across the Bay of Finland, running by city’s World Cup venue Zenit Arena, has reduced the trip there to less than an hour. Thanks to the sea breeze, the air is much fresher in Repino, a weekend getaway for the Soviet intelligentsia and now the nouveau riche, than in  St Petersburg. One of the typical rooms at the hotel Repino’s location, however, could backfire, like at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, when players complained about being isolated in Rustenberg. The village is a 45-minute trip from St Petersburg’s historic Finland Station on a rattletrap commuter train, but if there is traffic on the highway, the trip to the city could easily take twice as long. A 15-minute walk from the beach, ForRestMix is cut off from the decrepit Soviet sanatoriums around it by a fence, guardhouse and boom gate. It has underground parking and a “helicopter pad” – just a parking lot with a large “H” painted on it. While this is an upscale hotel by provincial Russian standards, it is still a far cry from the £500-a-night Auberge du Jeu de Paume in Chantilly where England stayed during Euro 2016. Rooms – decorated in gloomy brown and gold – cost £100-£200 a night. Across the street, an old Soviet sanatorium has been converted into a dormitory for migrant workers from Central Asia, who hang their overalls out to dry on the balconies. Staff said ForRestMix was a family recreation destination, and there were strollers outside several rooms and an occasional crying baby in the lobby. The reception at the ForRestMix hotel Judging by other noises coming from the rooms at night, it is also a romantic getaway – a dim restaurant with elaborate drapery, white baby grand piano and a candelabra on every table is geared toward this clientele. The menu was extensive, especially the 16-page drink list, and food ranged from simple Russian dishes to fancier fare like duck, crab and veal liver. ForRestMix has a gym, pool and a small sauna and hamam, as well as a VIP spa area, but England will have to bring a few more massage tables at the very least. The hotel could be considered high quality if not for the small flaws here and there: the stock art on the walls, a toe-stubbing slight change in floor elevation at a doorway, an out-of-order shower, an “exit” door that does not actually open. Reviewers have given the hotel a cumulative 4½ stars on TripAdvisor and five on Booking.com. Some, however, have not been impressed, with one comparing ForRestMix on TripAdvisor to a “transit hotel in Poland for the price of luxury accommodation”. Southgate’s team might be in for a surprise.

Welcome to the clean but rustic ForRestMix - England's World Cup hotel

Vladimir Lenin once hid from the Tsarist police in this sleepy seaside village on the northern outskirts of St Petersburg, and the famous artist Ilya Repin – after whom it was later renamed – sheltered here from the commotion of what was then the Russian capital. England’s football team will also avoid the hustle and bustle of the city of five million when they stay in Repino during the 2018 World Cup in Russia. But their choice of lodgings, the clean but rustic ForRestMix hotel, has raised eyebrows. “ForRestMix? They could have found themselves something better,” said Dmitry, the proprietor of a small shooting gallery with a portrait of Lenin on the wall. “There are lots in the city. The Astoria or the Grand Hotel Europe,” he added, referring to two five-star hotels in St Petersburg’s historic centre. “Even our national team don’t stay in such places when they travel. It’s simple, nothing special.” He noted that the Residence Hotel and Spa, a renovated Soviet complex built on the site where communist writer Maxim Gorky briefly took refuge, was considered the top accommodation in Repino, although it only has 60 rooms compared to the 107 in the ForRestMix. The hotel's swimming pool England qualified for the World Cup by beating Slovenia at Wembley on Thursday – and manager Gareth Southgate has reportedly already chosen ForRestMix as the team’s base and even been to inspect the facility. The hotel has a number of advantages. It is just six miles from Zelenogorsk, where the Three Lions will train at a complex being built for Russia’s youth Olympic reserve team. It is a good thing they are not training at the hotel, which has only two child-size goalposts on its grounds. While it is on the other side of St Petersburg from the airport, the new highway that cuts across the Bay of Finland, running by city’s World Cup venue Zenit Arena, has reduced the trip there to less than an hour. Thanks to the sea breeze, the air is much fresher in Repino, a weekend getaway for the Soviet intelligentsia and now the nouveau riche, than in  St Petersburg. One of the typical rooms at the hotel Repino’s location, however, could backfire, like at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, when players complained about being isolated in Rustenberg. The village is a 45-minute trip from St Petersburg’s historic Finland Station on a rattletrap commuter train, but if there is traffic on the highway, the trip to the city could easily take twice as long. A 15-minute walk from the beach, ForRestMix is cut off from the decrepit Soviet sanatoriums around it by a fence, guardhouse and boom gate. It has underground parking and a “helicopter pad” – just a parking lot with a large “H” painted on it. While this is an upscale hotel by provincial Russian standards, it is still a far cry from the £500-a-night Auberge du Jeu de Paume in Chantilly where England stayed during Euro 2016. Rooms – decorated in gloomy brown and gold – cost £100-£200 a night. Across the street, an old Soviet sanatorium has been converted into a dormitory for migrant workers from Central Asia, who hang their overalls out to dry on the balconies. Staff said ForRestMix was a family recreation destination, and there were strollers outside several rooms and an occasional crying baby in the lobby. The reception at the ForRestMix hotel Judging by other noises coming from the rooms at night, it is also a romantic getaway – a dim restaurant with elaborate drapery, white baby grand piano and a candelabra on every table is geared toward this clientele. The menu was extensive, especially the 16-page drink list, and food ranged from simple Russian dishes to fancier fare like duck, crab and veal liver. ForRestMix has a gym, pool and a small sauna and hamam, as well as a VIP spa area, but England will have to bring a few more massage tables at the very least. The hotel could be considered high quality if not for the small flaws here and there: the stock art on the walls, a toe-stubbing slight change in floor elevation at a doorway, an out-of-order shower, an “exit” door that does not actually open. Reviewers have given the hotel a cumulative 4½ stars on TripAdvisor and five on Booking.com. Some, however, have not been impressed, with one comparing ForRestMix on TripAdvisor to a “transit hotel in Poland for the price of luxury accommodation”. Southgate’s team might be in for a surprise.

Welcome to the clean but rustic ForRestMix - England's World Cup hotel

Vladimir Lenin once hid from the Tsarist police in this sleepy seaside village on the northern outskirts of St Petersburg, and the famous artist Ilya Repin – after whom it was later renamed – sheltered here from the commotion of what was then the Russian capital. England’s football team will also avoid the hustle and bustle of the city of five million when they stay in Repino during the 2018 World Cup in Russia. But their choice of lodgings, the clean but rustic ForRestMix hotel, has raised eyebrows. “ForRestMix? They could have found themselves something better,” said Dmitry, the proprietor of a small shooting gallery with a portrait of Lenin on the wall. “There are lots in the city. The Astoria or the Grand Hotel Europe,” he added, referring to two five-star hotels in St Petersburg’s historic centre. “Even our national team don’t stay in such places when they travel. It’s simple, nothing special.” He noted that the Residence Hotel and Spa, a renovated Soviet complex built on the site where communist writer Maxim Gorky briefly took refuge, was considered the top accommodation in Repino, although it only has 60 rooms compared to the 107 in the ForRestMix. The hotel's swimming pool England qualified for the World Cup by beating Slovenia at Wembley on Thursday – and manager Gareth Southgate has reportedly already chosen ForRestMix as the team’s base and even been to inspect the facility. The hotel has a number of advantages. It is just six miles from Zelenogorsk, where the Three Lions will train at a complex being built for Russia’s youth Olympic reserve team. It is a good thing they are not training at the hotel, which has only two child-size goalposts on its grounds. While it is on the other side of St Petersburg from the airport, the new highway that cuts across the Bay of Finland, running by city’s World Cup venue Zenit Arena, has reduced the trip there to less than an hour. Thanks to the sea breeze, the air is much fresher in Repino, a weekend getaway for the Soviet intelligentsia and now the nouveau riche, than in  St Petersburg. One of the typical rooms at the hotel Repino’s location, however, could backfire, like at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, when players complained about being isolated in Rustenberg. The village is a 45-minute trip from St Petersburg’s historic Finland Station on a rattletrap commuter train, but if there is traffic on the highway, the trip to the city could easily take twice as long. A 15-minute walk from the beach, ForRestMix is cut off from the decrepit Soviet sanatoriums around it by a fence, guardhouse and boom gate. It has underground parking and a “helicopter pad” – just a parking lot with a large “H” painted on it. While this is an upscale hotel by provincial Russian standards, it is still a far cry from the £500-a-night Auberge du Jeu de Paume in Chantilly where England stayed during Euro 2016. Rooms – decorated in gloomy brown and gold – cost £100-£200 a night. Across the street, an old Soviet sanatorium has been converted into a dormitory for migrant workers from Central Asia, who hang their overalls out to dry on the balconies. Staff said ForRestMix was a family recreation destination, and there were strollers outside several rooms and an occasional crying baby in the lobby. The reception at the ForRestMix hotel Judging by other noises coming from the rooms at night, it is also a romantic getaway – a dim restaurant with elaborate drapery, white baby grand piano and a candelabra on every table is geared toward this clientele. The menu was extensive, especially the 16-page drink list, and food ranged from simple Russian dishes to fancier fare like duck, crab and veal liver. ForRestMix has a gym, pool and a small sauna and hamam, as well as a VIP spa area, but England will have to bring a few more massage tables at the very least. The hotel could be considered high quality if not for the small flaws here and there: the stock art on the walls, a toe-stubbing slight change in floor elevation at a doorway, an out-of-order shower, an “exit” door that does not actually open. Reviewers have given the hotel a cumulative 4½ stars on TripAdvisor and five on Booking.com. Some, however, have not been impressed, with one comparing ForRestMix on TripAdvisor to a “transit hotel in Poland for the price of luxury accommodation”. Southgate’s team might be in for a surprise.

Welcome to the clean but rustic ForRestMix - England's World Cup hotel

Vladimir Lenin once hid from the Tsarist police in this sleepy seaside village on the northern outskirts of St Petersburg, and the famous artist Ilya Repin – after whom it was later renamed – sheltered here from the commotion of what was then the Russian capital. England’s football team will also avoid the hustle and bustle of the city of five million when they stay in Repino during the 2018 World Cup in Russia. But their choice of lodgings, the clean but rustic ForRestMix hotel, has raised eyebrows. “ForRestMix? They could have found themselves something better,” said Dmitry, the proprietor of a small shooting gallery with a portrait of Lenin on the wall. “There are lots in the city. The Astoria or the Grand Hotel Europe,” he added, referring to two five-star hotels in St Petersburg’s historic centre. “Even our national team don’t stay in such places when they travel. It’s simple, nothing special.” He noted that the Residence Hotel and Spa, a renovated Soviet complex built on the site where communist writer Maxim Gorky briefly took refuge, was considered the top accommodation in Repino, although it only has 60 rooms compared to the 107 in the ForRestMix. The hotel's swimming pool England qualified for the World Cup by beating Slovenia at Wembley on Thursday – and manager Gareth Southgate has reportedly already chosen ForRestMix as the team’s base and even been to inspect the facility. The hotel has a number of advantages. It is just six miles from Zelenogorsk, where the Three Lions will train at a complex being built for Russia’s youth Olympic reserve team. It is a good thing they are not training at the hotel, which has only two child-size goalposts on its grounds. While it is on the other side of St Petersburg from the airport, the new highway that cuts across the Bay of Finland, running by city’s World Cup venue Zenit Arena, has reduced the trip there to less than an hour. Thanks to the sea breeze, the air is much fresher in Repino, a weekend getaway for the Soviet intelligentsia and now the nouveau riche, than in  St Petersburg. One of the typical rooms at the hotel Repino’s location, however, could backfire, like at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, when players complained about being isolated in Rustenberg. The village is a 45-minute trip from St Petersburg’s historic Finland Station on a rattletrap commuter train, but if there is traffic on the highway, the trip to the city could easily take twice as long. A 15-minute walk from the beach, ForRestMix is cut off from the decrepit Soviet sanatoriums around it by a fence, guardhouse and boom gate. It has underground parking and a “helicopter pad” – just a parking lot with a large “H” painted on it. While this is an upscale hotel by provincial Russian standards, it is still a far cry from the £500-a-night Auberge du Jeu de Paume in Chantilly where England stayed during Euro 2016. Rooms – decorated in gloomy brown and gold – cost £100-£200 a night. Across the street, an old Soviet sanatorium has been converted into a dormitory for migrant workers from Central Asia, who hang their overalls out to dry on the balconies. Staff said ForRestMix was a family recreation destination, and there were strollers outside several rooms and an occasional crying baby in the lobby. The reception at the ForRestMix hotel Judging by other noises coming from the rooms at night, it is also a romantic getaway – a dim restaurant with elaborate drapery, white baby grand piano and a candelabra on every table is geared toward this clientele. The menu was extensive, especially the 16-page drink list, and food ranged from simple Russian dishes to fancier fare like duck, crab and veal liver. ForRestMix has a gym, pool and a small sauna and hamam, as well as a VIP spa area, but England will have to bring a few more massage tables at the very least. The hotel could be considered high quality if not for the small flaws here and there: the stock art on the walls, a toe-stubbing slight change in floor elevation at a doorway, an out-of-order shower, an “exit” door that does not actually open. Reviewers have given the hotel a cumulative 4½ stars on TripAdvisor and five on Booking.com. Some, however, have not been impressed, with one comparing ForRestMix on TripAdvisor to a “transit hotel in Poland for the price of luxury accommodation”. Southgate’s team might be in for a surprise.

An interior view shows a swimming pool at the ForRestMix club SPA hotel which was chosen to be the base for England’s soccer team during the 2018 FIFA World Cup, in Repino

An interior view shows a swimming pool at the ForRestMix club SPA hotel which was chosen to be the base for England’s soccer team during the 2018 FIFA World Cup, in Repino, a village in the suburb of St. Petersburg, Russia October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Anton Vaganov

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