Scherma

Le foto degli incontri di scherma

Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Action from Leinster’s 30-19 victory over Saracens in the European Rugby Champions Cup quarter-final in<br>Dublin.
Champions Cup pulled into firing line in Premiership ring-fencing wrangle
Action from Leinster’s 30-19 victory over Saracens in the European Rugby Champions Cup quarter-final in
Dublin.
<p>Protesters have interrupted the arrival of paying customers in two of the team&#39;s previous three games...</p>
Fencing already up, heavy police presence expected for Kings-Pacers at Golden 1

Protesters have interrupted the arrival of paying customers in two of the team's previous three games...

Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer of Switzerland celebrates after defeating Alex Fava (back) of France in the men&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer of Switzerland celebrates after defeating Alex Fava (back) of France in the men's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer of Switzerland celebrates after defeating Alex Fava (back) of France in the men's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer (L) of Switzerland in action against Alex Fava (R) of France during the men&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer (L) of Switzerland in action against Alex Fava (R) of France during the men's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer (L) of Switzerland in action against Alex Fava (R) of France during the men's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer (R) of Switzerland in action against Alex Fava (L) of France during the men&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer (R) of Switzerland in action against Alex Fava (L) of France during the men's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Max Heinzer (R) of Switzerland in action against Alex Fava (L) of France during the men's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Suiza, Francia, Hungría) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria of Italy celebrates after defeating Lin Sheng of China in the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria (R) of Italy in action against Lin Sheng (L) of China during the women&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria (R) of Italy in action against Lin Sheng (L) of China during the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria (R) of Italy in action against Lin Sheng (L) of China during the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria (R) of Italy in action against Lin Sheng (L) of China during the women&#39;s epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria (R) of Italy in action against Lin Sheng (L) of China during the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
Budapest (Hungary), 25/03/2018.- Mara Navarria (R) of Italy in action against Lin Sheng (L) of China during the women's epee final round of the WestEnd Grand Prix as part the Fencing World Cup at the MOM Sports Centre in Budapest, Hungary, 25 March 2018. (Hungría, Italia) EFE/EPA/TAMAS KOVACS HUNGARY OUT
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 18: Arnold Schwarzenegger poses with fencing athletes during the Arnold Sports Festival Australia at The Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre on March 18, 2018 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)
Arnold Sports Festival Australia
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 18: Arnold Schwarzenegger poses with fencing athletes during the Arnold Sports Festival Australia at The Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre on March 18, 2018 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)
Rome (Italy), 17/03/2018.- Giovanni Malago (R), president of the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI), and Italian paralympic fencing champion Bebe Vio (L, bottom) react during the Six Nations rugby match between Italy and Scotland at Olimpico Stadium in Rome, Italy, 17 March 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ETTORE FERRARI
Rome (Italy), 17/03/2018.- Giovanni Malago (R), president of the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI), and Italian paralympic fencing champion Bebe Vio (L, bottom) react during the Six Nations rugby match between Italy and Scotland at Olimpico Stadium in Rome, Italy, 17 March 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ETTORE FERRARI
Rome (Italy), 17/03/2018.- Giovanni Malago (R), president of the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI), and Italian paralympic fencing champion Bebe Vio (L, bottom) react during the Six Nations rugby match between Italy and Scotland at Olimpico Stadium in Rome, Italy, 17 March 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ETTORE FERRARI
<p>NCAA stands for National Collegiate Athletic Association.</p><p>The non-profit organization is made up of 1,117 schools that are split into 40 conferences. among three divisions. Division II schools do not have as many athletic scholarships to offer as Division I schools, and Division III schools do not award any athletic scholarships.</p><p>There are 24 sports played by NCAA teams. Baseball, basketball (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), beach volleyball, bowling, cross country (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), fencing, field hockey, football, golf (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), gymnastics (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), ice hockey (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), lacrosse (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), rifle, rowing, skiing, soccer (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), softball, swimming and diving (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), tennis (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), indoor track (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), outdoor track (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), volleyball (men&#39;s and women&#39;s), water polo (men&#39;s and women&#39;s) and wrestling are the sports the NCAA offers.</p><p>The organization was founded in 1906 and its headquarters is in Indianapolis.</p><p>There are 351 teams in Division I men&#39;s basketball, 349 Division I women&#39;s basketball teams and 252 Division I football teams (129 in Division I-A and 123 in Division I-AA).</p>
What Does NCAA Stand For?

NCAA stands for National Collegiate Athletic Association.

The non-profit organization is made up of 1,117 schools that are split into 40 conferences. among three divisions. Division II schools do not have as many athletic scholarships to offer as Division I schools, and Division III schools do not award any athletic scholarships.

There are 24 sports played by NCAA teams. Baseball, basketball (men's and women's), beach volleyball, bowling, cross country (men's and women's), fencing, field hockey, football, golf (men's and women's), gymnastics (men's and women's), ice hockey (men's and women's), lacrosse (men's and women's), rifle, rowing, skiing, soccer (men's and women's), softball, swimming and diving (men's and women's), tennis (men's and women's), indoor track (men's and women's), outdoor track (men's and women's), volleyball (men's and women's), water polo (men's and women's) and wrestling are the sports the NCAA offers.

The organization was founded in 1906 and its headquarters is in Indianapolis.

There are 351 teams in Division I men's basketball, 349 Division I women's basketball teams and 252 Division I football teams (129 in Division I-A and 123 in Division I-AA).

This should have been one of the best weeks of the season for Dulwich Hamlet. On Tuesday night they scored in the 83rd minute and again in stoppage time to beat Billericay Town 3-1, leapfrogging them to the top of the Bostik Premier Division. Then, playing away at Brentwood Town on Thursday night, goalkeeper Corey Addai scored a free-kick in the 90th minute, taking Dulwich to the semi finals of the Velocity Trophy. The celebrations, though, were bittersweet, as the club had their licence to play at home ground Champion Hill Stadium terminated earlier this week. Shortly after the club was handed legal papers saying they could no longer use the names “Dulwich Hamlet”, “The Hamlet” or the initials “DHFC”. This, for a Hamlet fan like myself, was like a kick in the proverbials from hard-man defender Mark Weatherstone. For anyone not up to speed with seventh-tier football, Dulwich Hamlet are one of the country’s oldest and most popular non-league teams. Attendances at Champion Hill often exceed 2,000 - a number that would not look out of place three tiers higher in League Two - largely thanks to a gentrifying demographic who have moved to south London with a thirst for lower league football, and possibly a simultaneous can or two of craft beer. But the slings and arrows of Hamlet’s outrageous fortune are as distressing as they are familiar. Wimbledon FC walked away from Plough Lane in 1991 and into a groundshare with Crystal Palace. Brighton were forced out of the Goldstone Ground in 1997 and played at Gillingham, then an unfit for purpose athletics stadium. Currently Dagenham and Redbridge are fighting to stay afloat after recently losing the funding of major benefactor and club director Glyn Hopkin. There is nothing new about football clubs being caught between property developers, local councils and financial benefactors. But there’s something about Dulwich Hamlet’s story - a team celebrating its 125th anniversary, top of the league, with an ex-Premier League footballer trying to save the day (more on that later) - which has captured imaginations. Good to meet with supporters of @DulwichHamletFC to discuss plans to address appalling behaviour of developer & save our successful, cherished club - working with @HarrietHarman@peterjohn6@dhstorg@LordRoyKennedy#SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/bXopWxFwdk— Helen Hayes (@helenhayes_) March 6, 2018 So what exactly is going on at Dulwich Hamlet, and who is to blame? Discussions to build on Champion Hill have been ongoing since 2003 when the construction of a Homebase store was mooted. In 2008, owners King&#39;s College London sold the freehold of the stadium to property developers DHPD Ltd, which attempted but failed to build apartments on the site. After DHPD went into administration the ground was sold to Hadley Property Group in 2014 for a reported £5.7 million. Ownership of the club itself remained with a man named Nick McCormack, although in writing off the club’s significant debts, which had brought it close to administration, Hadley held the option to buy McCormack’s shares. The current problems began in March 2016, when Hadley revealed plans for an £80m housing development at Champion Hill. As part of the bid it proposed to build a brand new stadium on the adjacent Green Dale Fields, buy the club from McCormack and hand it to the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust. In October that year the CEO of Hadley started a new firm, Meadow Residential, which took on the Champion Hill redevelopment project. So far, so good. Members of the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust voted 94 per cent in favour of this proposal, in fact. But the bid fell through. Southwark Council rejected it on the grounds that the proposed new ground would be built on protected Metropolitan Open Land at Green Dale, which had been leased by Dulwich Hamlet until last October. It also said Meadow’s housing plan failed to meet basic requirements for social and affordable housing. Meadow and Southwark Council locked horns, with a series of fiery online statements culminating in a public face-off on the BBC’s Sunday Politics show. Messages to @DulwichHamletFC#DHFC supporters and soulless landlords, from outside the latter’s NY headquarters. You can guess which message is meant for which recipient #SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/3AKHZgYYqN— Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) March 6, 2018 “We want to see Dulwich Hamlet prosper on their current site,” said Peter John of Southwark Council. “It is absolutely not my desire to see it close,” said Andrew McDaniel of Meadow. “They’ll sort it out,” said many optimistic fans, and life went on. Supporters continued to form a snaking queue around the Sainsbury’s car park next to Champion Hill at 2.45pm on matchdays, Ashley Carew kept nestling free kicks into the top corner of the net, and Dulwich Hamlet&#39;s so-called &#39;Ultras&#39; kept stalking the opposition’s goal - singing their favourite chant: &quot;We&#39;re the famous Dulwich Hamlet and we look like Tuscany.&quot; Though ownership of the club was still with McCormack, Meadow had been supporting Dulwich Hamlet’s running costs for years - players’ wages and all - at an alleged loss of £170,000 per year. But after discussions with Southwark Council reached a stalemate, Meadow announced it would be terminating its financial support. In response, the supporters’ trust, the Dulwich Hamlet board of directors and a grassroots fundraising group called The 12th Man joined forces to shake buckets, sell raffle tickets and manage the turnstiles at home games. Brighton&#39;s directors sold the Goldstone Ground without consulting their supporters in 1997 Credit: Ross Kinnaird/ALLSPORT A ray of hope beamed on Champion Hill in February this year, when it was announced that Rio Ferdinand, who grew up in nearby Peckham and is a friend of Dulwich Hamlet’s manager Gavin Rose, had recently made a £10m bid for Champion Hill Stadium through his affordable housing company Legacy. Alas, Meadow rejected the bid, reportedly asking for a minimum of £13m for the site. Which brings us to this week, when Meadow handed Dulwich a bill of £121,000 for backdated rent. The agreement had always been that Meadow would financially support their tenants, so this came as an unwelcome surprise to the club. Meadow served notice that Dulwich Hamlet could no longer play at Champion Hill Stadium - effective immediately. Then, writing on behalf of Greendales IP LLC, an off-shoot of Meadow, the US-based solicitors Blake Morgan informed the club that their previously un-trademarked name and initials had been trademarked in October last year and that the club could not continue using them. Meadow has since reportedly contacted the supporters’ trust to offer them the trademark of Dulwich Hamlet’s name and initials, with a suggestion made in a press statement to the BBC that it may also be willing to go back on the eviction notice if their requests from Southwark Council are met. What’s next? In a statement to Telegraph Sport, Rio Ferdinand’s Legacy Partners confirmed that their offer is still on the table: “Legacy remain very keen to help Dulwich Hamlet Football Club, Southwark Council and the community in the area. We have asked Meadow for a price in which they will sell the site and they continue to refuse to answer the emails,” it said. “Rio and the Legacy Partners simply wish to move at pace to clean this situation up but we cannot do so unless Meadow respond to us. We are fully funded and ready to help.” In an open letter to Meadow sent this week, London Mayor Sadiq Khan and Southwark’s Peter John put their own offer on the table. They wrote: “Southwark Council is keen to safeguard the future of DHFC at the site and would be happy to consider meeting with Meadow to negotiate to acquire the site itself at market value.” Telegraph Sporthas approached Meadow for comment on its stance on Legacy and Southwark Council’s respective offers, with no response so far. However, in its most recent press statement Meadow reasserted its position, saying: &quot;Meadow owns the Champion Hill site and wishes to develop it to provide much-needed housing, including affordable housing, and a new stadium for the club therefore securing its future at Champion Hill.” From whichever angle you approach the debate, it’s fair to assume that Meadow’s recent heavy-handed actions will not have improved its chances of having its housing development plans approved by Southwark Council. Benji Lanyado, CEO of Hamlet’s shirt sponsor, Picfair, said: “By showing everyone exactly how they operate, they’ve given Southwark even less reason to work with them. Now, surely, the only option they have is to sell - which would be a happy ending of entirely their own making.” Just been past @DulwichHamletFC. Seems like Meadows have started installing fencing around the grounds and putting up warnings to “trespassers”. Also the security guard who asked me to leave pointed out new CCTV cameras. Looks like DHFC will be televised after all. pic.twitter.com/sL7nqhxv9q— 36 Reasons SE5 (@36ReasonsSE5) March 8, 2018 With the debate continuing to rage, club director Tom Cullen has more immediate concerns: where will the club host their next home fixture against Worthing Town on March 17? Cullen told The Telegraph that he and manager Gavin Rose spent Wednesday visiting local clubs that have offered their stadiums as potential ground shares. One option could be local rivals Tooting and Mitcham. A lot of anger has been targeted at Meadow in recent months from Hamlet fans, but it is not the first property developer to buy a stadium for housing, nor will it be the last. Football-pitch-sized land in London is extremely valuable and, as it stands, is the owner’s to do with what they want. To entertain just one footballing metaphor: even the heaviest, most painful of challenges are sometimes permissible by the rule book. Once this debacle has been settled Dulwich Hamlet supporters and indeed all football fans who want to protect the futures of their clubs, should put their rage towards property developers to one side. Instead they must do something productive such as writing to their local MPs. We protect land (like Green Dale), landmarks and cultural institutions at the heart of communities - perhaps now is the time to lobby the government to introduce meaningful legislation that will give similarly protected status to football stadiums. Only then, with a bit of luck, will fans be able to go back to moaning about something really important - like football.
Kicked out of their stadium, forbidden from using their own name, but is Rio Ferdinand about to save non-league Dulwich Hamlet?
This should have been one of the best weeks of the season for Dulwich Hamlet. On Tuesday night they scored in the 83rd minute and again in stoppage time to beat Billericay Town 3-1, leapfrogging them to the top of the Bostik Premier Division. Then, playing away at Brentwood Town on Thursday night, goalkeeper Corey Addai scored a free-kick in the 90th minute, taking Dulwich to the semi finals of the Velocity Trophy. The celebrations, though, were bittersweet, as the club had their licence to play at home ground Champion Hill Stadium terminated earlier this week. Shortly after the club was handed legal papers saying they could no longer use the names “Dulwich Hamlet”, “The Hamlet” or the initials “DHFC”. This, for a Hamlet fan like myself, was like a kick in the proverbials from hard-man defender Mark Weatherstone. For anyone not up to speed with seventh-tier football, Dulwich Hamlet are one of the country’s oldest and most popular non-league teams. Attendances at Champion Hill often exceed 2,000 - a number that would not look out of place three tiers higher in League Two - largely thanks to a gentrifying demographic who have moved to south London with a thirst for lower league football, and possibly a simultaneous can or two of craft beer. But the slings and arrows of Hamlet’s outrageous fortune are as distressing as they are familiar. Wimbledon FC walked away from Plough Lane in 1991 and into a groundshare with Crystal Palace. Brighton were forced out of the Goldstone Ground in 1997 and played at Gillingham, then an unfit for purpose athletics stadium. Currently Dagenham and Redbridge are fighting to stay afloat after recently losing the funding of major benefactor and club director Glyn Hopkin. There is nothing new about football clubs being caught between property developers, local councils and financial benefactors. But there’s something about Dulwich Hamlet’s story - a team celebrating its 125th anniversary, top of the league, with an ex-Premier League footballer trying to save the day (more on that later) - which has captured imaginations. Good to meet with supporters of @DulwichHamletFC to discuss plans to address appalling behaviour of developer & save our successful, cherished club - working with @HarrietHarman@peterjohn6@dhstorg@LordRoyKennedy#SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/bXopWxFwdk— Helen Hayes (@helenhayes_) March 6, 2018 So what exactly is going on at Dulwich Hamlet, and who is to blame? Discussions to build on Champion Hill have been ongoing since 2003 when the construction of a Homebase store was mooted. In 2008, owners King's College London sold the freehold of the stadium to property developers DHPD Ltd, which attempted but failed to build apartments on the site. After DHPD went into administration the ground was sold to Hadley Property Group in 2014 for a reported £5.7 million. Ownership of the club itself remained with a man named Nick McCormack, although in writing off the club’s significant debts, which had brought it close to administration, Hadley held the option to buy McCormack’s shares. The current problems began in March 2016, when Hadley revealed plans for an £80m housing development at Champion Hill. As part of the bid it proposed to build a brand new stadium on the adjacent Green Dale Fields, buy the club from McCormack and hand it to the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust. In October that year the CEO of Hadley started a new firm, Meadow Residential, which took on the Champion Hill redevelopment project. So far, so good. Members of the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust voted 94 per cent in favour of this proposal, in fact. But the bid fell through. Southwark Council rejected it on the grounds that the proposed new ground would be built on protected Metropolitan Open Land at Green Dale, which had been leased by Dulwich Hamlet until last October. It also said Meadow’s housing plan failed to meet basic requirements for social and affordable housing. Meadow and Southwark Council locked horns, with a series of fiery online statements culminating in a public face-off on the BBC’s Sunday Politics show. Messages to @DulwichHamletFC#DHFC supporters and soulless landlords, from outside the latter’s NY headquarters. You can guess which message is meant for which recipient #SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/3AKHZgYYqN— Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) March 6, 2018 “We want to see Dulwich Hamlet prosper on their current site,” said Peter John of Southwark Council. “It is absolutely not my desire to see it close,” said Andrew McDaniel of Meadow. “They’ll sort it out,” said many optimistic fans, and life went on. Supporters continued to form a snaking queue around the Sainsbury’s car park next to Champion Hill at 2.45pm on matchdays, Ashley Carew kept nestling free kicks into the top corner of the net, and Dulwich Hamlet's so-called 'Ultras' kept stalking the opposition’s goal - singing their favourite chant: "We're the famous Dulwich Hamlet and we look like Tuscany." Though ownership of the club was still with McCormack, Meadow had been supporting Dulwich Hamlet’s running costs for years - players’ wages and all - at an alleged loss of £170,000 per year. But after discussions with Southwark Council reached a stalemate, Meadow announced it would be terminating its financial support. In response, the supporters’ trust, the Dulwich Hamlet board of directors and a grassroots fundraising group called The 12th Man joined forces to shake buckets, sell raffle tickets and manage the turnstiles at home games. Brighton's directors sold the Goldstone Ground without consulting their supporters in 1997 Credit: Ross Kinnaird/ALLSPORT A ray of hope beamed on Champion Hill in February this year, when it was announced that Rio Ferdinand, who grew up in nearby Peckham and is a friend of Dulwich Hamlet’s manager Gavin Rose, had recently made a £10m bid for Champion Hill Stadium through his affordable housing company Legacy. Alas, Meadow rejected the bid, reportedly asking for a minimum of £13m for the site. Which brings us to this week, when Meadow handed Dulwich a bill of £121,000 for backdated rent. The agreement had always been that Meadow would financially support their tenants, so this came as an unwelcome surprise to the club. Meadow served notice that Dulwich Hamlet could no longer play at Champion Hill Stadium - effective immediately. Then, writing on behalf of Greendales IP LLC, an off-shoot of Meadow, the US-based solicitors Blake Morgan informed the club that their previously un-trademarked name and initials had been trademarked in October last year and that the club could not continue using them. Meadow has since reportedly contacted the supporters’ trust to offer them the trademark of Dulwich Hamlet’s name and initials, with a suggestion made in a press statement to the BBC that it may also be willing to go back on the eviction notice if their requests from Southwark Council are met. What’s next? In a statement to Telegraph Sport, Rio Ferdinand’s Legacy Partners confirmed that their offer is still on the table: “Legacy remain very keen to help Dulwich Hamlet Football Club, Southwark Council and the community in the area. We have asked Meadow for a price in which they will sell the site and they continue to refuse to answer the emails,” it said. “Rio and the Legacy Partners simply wish to move at pace to clean this situation up but we cannot do so unless Meadow respond to us. We are fully funded and ready to help.” In an open letter to Meadow sent this week, London Mayor Sadiq Khan and Southwark’s Peter John put their own offer on the table. They wrote: “Southwark Council is keen to safeguard the future of DHFC at the site and would be happy to consider meeting with Meadow to negotiate to acquire the site itself at market value.” Telegraph Sporthas approached Meadow for comment on its stance on Legacy and Southwark Council’s respective offers, with no response so far. However, in its most recent press statement Meadow reasserted its position, saying: "Meadow owns the Champion Hill site and wishes to develop it to provide much-needed housing, including affordable housing, and a new stadium for the club therefore securing its future at Champion Hill.” From whichever angle you approach the debate, it’s fair to assume that Meadow’s recent heavy-handed actions will not have improved its chances of having its housing development plans approved by Southwark Council. Benji Lanyado, CEO of Hamlet’s shirt sponsor, Picfair, said: “By showing everyone exactly how they operate, they’ve given Southwark even less reason to work with them. Now, surely, the only option they have is to sell - which would be a happy ending of entirely their own making.” Just been past @DulwichHamletFC. Seems like Meadows have started installing fencing around the grounds and putting up warnings to “trespassers”. Also the security guard who asked me to leave pointed out new CCTV cameras. Looks like DHFC will be televised after all. pic.twitter.com/sL7nqhxv9q— 36 Reasons SE5 (@36ReasonsSE5) March 8, 2018 With the debate continuing to rage, club director Tom Cullen has more immediate concerns: where will the club host their next home fixture against Worthing Town on March 17? Cullen told The Telegraph that he and manager Gavin Rose spent Wednesday visiting local clubs that have offered their stadiums as potential ground shares. One option could be local rivals Tooting and Mitcham. A lot of anger has been targeted at Meadow in recent months from Hamlet fans, but it is not the first property developer to buy a stadium for housing, nor will it be the last. Football-pitch-sized land in London is extremely valuable and, as it stands, is the owner’s to do with what they want. To entertain just one footballing metaphor: even the heaviest, most painful of challenges are sometimes permissible by the rule book. Once this debacle has been settled Dulwich Hamlet supporters and indeed all football fans who want to protect the futures of their clubs, should put their rage towards property developers to one side. Instead they must do something productive such as writing to their local MPs. We protect land (like Green Dale), landmarks and cultural institutions at the heart of communities - perhaps now is the time to lobby the government to introduce meaningful legislation that will give similarly protected status to football stadiums. Only then, with a bit of luck, will fans be able to go back to moaning about something really important - like football.
This should have been one of the best weeks of the season for Dulwich Hamlet. On Tuesday night they scored in the 83rd minute and again in stoppage time to beat Billericay Town 3-1, leapfrogging them to the top of the Bostik Premier Division. Then, playing away at Brentwood Town on Thursday night, goalkeeper Corey Addai scored a free-kick in the 90th minute, taking Dulwich to the semi finals of the Velocity Trophy. The celebrations, though, were bittersweet, as the club had their licence to play at home ground Champion Hill Stadium terminated earlier this week. Shortly after the club was handed legal papers saying they could no longer use the names “Dulwich Hamlet”, “The Hamlet” or the initials “DHFC”. This, for a Hamlet fan like myself, was like a kick in the proverbials from hard-man defender Mark Weatherstone. For anyone not up to speed with seventh-tier football, Dulwich Hamlet are one of the country’s oldest and most popular non-league teams. Attendances at Champion Hill often exceed 2,000 - a number that would not look out of place three tiers higher in League Two - largely thanks to a gentrifying demographic who have moved to south London with a thirst for lower league football, and possibly a simultaneous can or two of craft beer. But the slings and arrows of Hamlet’s outrageous fortune are as distressing as they are familiar. Wimbledon FC walked away from Plough Lane in 1991 and into a groundshare with Crystal Palace. Brighton were forced out of the Goldstone Ground in 1997 and played at Gillingham, then an unfit for purpose athletics stadium. Currently Dagenham and Redbridge are fighting to stay afloat after recently losing the funding of major benefactor and club director Glyn Hopkin. There is nothing new about football clubs being caught between property developers, local councils and financial benefactors. But there’s something about Dulwich Hamlet’s story - a team celebrating its 125th anniversary, top of the league, with an ex-Premier League footballer trying to save the day (more on that later) - which has captured imaginations. Good to meet with supporters of @DulwichHamletFC to discuss plans to address appalling behaviour of developer & save our successful, cherished club - working with @HarrietHarman@peterjohn6@dhstorg@LordRoyKennedy#SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/bXopWxFwdk— Helen Hayes (@helenhayes_) March 6, 2018 So what exactly is going on at Dulwich Hamlet, and who is to blame? Discussions to build on Champion Hill have been ongoing since 2003 when the construction of a Homebase store was mooted. In 2008, owners King&#39;s College London sold the freehold of the stadium to property developers DHPD Ltd, which attempted but failed to build apartments on the site. After DHPD went into administration the ground was sold to Hadley Property Group in 2014 for a reported £5.7 million. Ownership of the club itself remained with a man named Nick McCormack, although in writing off the club’s significant debts, which had brought it close to administration, Hadley held the option to buy McCormack’s shares. The current problems began in March 2016, when Hadley revealed plans for an £80m housing development at Champion Hill. As part of the bid it proposed to build a brand new stadium on the adjacent Green Dale Fields, buy the club from McCormack and hand it to the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust. In October that year the CEO of Hadley started a new firm, Meadow Residential, which took on the Champion Hill redevelopment project. So far, so good. Members of the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust voted 94 per cent in favour of this proposal, in fact. But the bid fell through. Southwark Council rejected it on the grounds that the proposed new ground would be built on protected Metropolitan Open Land at Green Dale, which had been leased by Dulwich Hamlet until last October. It also said Meadow’s housing plan failed to meet basic requirements for social and affordable housing. Meadow and Southwark Council locked horns, with a series of fiery online statements culminating in a public face-off on the BBC’s Sunday Politics show. Messages to @DulwichHamletFC#DHFC supporters and soulless landlords, from outside the latter’s NY headquarters. You can guess which message is meant for which recipient #SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/3AKHZgYYqN— Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) March 6, 2018 “We want to see Dulwich Hamlet prosper on their current site,” said Peter John of Southwark Council. “It is absolutely not my desire to see it close,” said Andrew McDaniel of Meadow. “They’ll sort it out,” said many optimistic fans, and life went on. Supporters continued to form a snaking queue around the Sainsbury’s car park next to Champion Hill at 2.45pm on matchdays, Ashley Carew kept nestling free kicks into the top corner of the net, and Dulwich Hamlet&#39;s so-called &#39;Ultras&#39; kept stalking the opposition’s goal - singing their favourite chant: &quot;We&#39;re the famous Dulwich Hamlet and we look like Tuscany.&quot; Though ownership of the club was still with McCormack, Meadow had been supporting Dulwich Hamlet’s running costs for years - players’ wages and all - at an alleged loss of £170,000 per year. But after discussions with Southwark Council reached a stalemate, Meadow announced it would be terminating its financial support. In response, the supporters’ trust, the Dulwich Hamlet board of directors and a grassroots fundraising group called The 12th Man joined forces to shake buckets, sell raffle tickets and manage the turnstiles at home games. Brighton&#39;s directors sold the Goldstone Ground without consulting their supporters in 1997 Credit: Ross Kinnaird/ALLSPORT A ray of hope beamed on Champion Hill in February this year, when it was announced that Rio Ferdinand, who grew up in nearby Peckham and is a friend of Dulwich Hamlet’s manager Gavin Rose, had recently made a £10m bid for Champion Hill Stadium through his affordable housing company Legacy. Alas, Meadow rejected the bid, reportedly asking for a minimum of £13m for the site. Which brings us to this week, when Meadow handed Dulwich a bill of £121,000 for backdated rent. The agreement had always been that Meadow would financially support their tenants, so this came as an unwelcome surprise to the club. Meadow served notice that Dulwich Hamlet could no longer play at Champion Hill Stadium - effective immediately. Then, writing on behalf of Greendales IP LLC, an off-shoot of Meadow, the US-based solicitors Blake Morgan informed the club that their previously un-trademarked name and initials had been trademarked in October last year and that the club could not continue using them. Meadow has since reportedly contacted the supporters’ trust to offer them the trademark of Dulwich Hamlet’s name and initials, with a suggestion made in a press statement to the BBC that it may also be willing to go back on the eviction notice if their requests from Southwark Council are met. What’s next? In a statement to Telegraph Sport, Rio Ferdinand’s Legacy Partners confirmed that their offer is still on the table: “Legacy remain very keen to help Dulwich Hamlet Football Club, Southwark Council and the community in the area. We have asked Meadow for a price in which they will sell the site and they continue to refuse to answer the emails,” it said. “Rio and the Legacy Partners simply wish to move at pace to clean this situation up but we cannot do so unless Meadow respond to us. We are fully funded and ready to help.” In an open letter to Meadow sent this week, London Mayor Sadiq Khan and Southwark’s Peter John put their own offer on the table. They wrote: “Southwark Council is keen to safeguard the future of DHFC at the site and would be happy to consider meeting with Meadow to negotiate to acquire the site itself at market value.” Telegraph Sporthas approached Meadow for comment on its stance on Legacy and Southwark Council’s respective offers, with no response so far. However, in its most recent press statement Meadow reasserted its position, saying: &quot;Meadow owns the Champion Hill site and wishes to develop it to provide much-needed housing, including affordable housing, and a new stadium for the club therefore securing its future at Champion Hill.” From whichever angle you approach the debate, it’s fair to assume that Meadow’s recent heavy-handed actions will not have improved its chances of having its housing development plans approved by Southwark Council. Benji Lanyado, CEO of Hamlet’s shirt sponsor, Picfair, said: “By showing everyone exactly how they operate, they’ve given Southwark even less reason to work with them. Now, surely, the only option they have is to sell - which would be a happy ending of entirely their own making.” Just been past @DulwichHamletFC. Seems like Meadows have started installing fencing around the grounds and putting up warnings to “trespassers”. Also the security guard who asked me to leave pointed out new CCTV cameras. Looks like DHFC will be televised after all. pic.twitter.com/sL7nqhxv9q— 36 Reasons SE5 (@36ReasonsSE5) March 8, 2018 With the debate continuing to rage, club director Tom Cullen has more immediate concerns: where will the club host their next home fixture against Worthing Town on March 17? Cullen told The Telegraph that he and manager Gavin Rose spent Wednesday visiting local clubs that have offered their stadiums as potential ground shares. One option could be local rivals Tooting and Mitcham. A lot of anger has been targeted at Meadow in recent months from Hamlet fans, but it is not the first property developer to buy a stadium for housing, nor will it be the last. Football-pitch-sized land in London is extremely valuable and, as it stands, is the owner’s to do with what they want. To entertain just one footballing metaphor: even the heaviest, most painful of challenges are sometimes permissible by the rule book. Once this debacle has been settled Dulwich Hamlet supporters and indeed all football fans who want to protect the futures of their clubs, should put their rage towards property developers to one side. Instead they must do something productive such as writing to their local MPs. We protect land (like Green Dale), landmarks and cultural institutions at the heart of communities - perhaps now is the time to lobby the government to introduce meaningful legislation that will give similarly protected status to football stadiums. Only then, with a bit of luck, will fans be able to go back to moaning about something really important - like football.
Kicked out of their stadium, forbidden from using their own name, but is Rio Ferdinand about to save non-league Dulwich Hamlet?
This should have been one of the best weeks of the season for Dulwich Hamlet. On Tuesday night they scored in the 83rd minute and again in stoppage time to beat Billericay Town 3-1, leapfrogging them to the top of the Bostik Premier Division. Then, playing away at Brentwood Town on Thursday night, goalkeeper Corey Addai scored a free-kick in the 90th minute, taking Dulwich to the semi finals of the Velocity Trophy. The celebrations, though, were bittersweet, as the club had their licence to play at home ground Champion Hill Stadium terminated earlier this week. Shortly after the club was handed legal papers saying they could no longer use the names “Dulwich Hamlet”, “The Hamlet” or the initials “DHFC”. This, for a Hamlet fan like myself, was like a kick in the proverbials from hard-man defender Mark Weatherstone. For anyone not up to speed with seventh-tier football, Dulwich Hamlet are one of the country’s oldest and most popular non-league teams. Attendances at Champion Hill often exceed 2,000 - a number that would not look out of place three tiers higher in League Two - largely thanks to a gentrifying demographic who have moved to south London with a thirst for lower league football, and possibly a simultaneous can or two of craft beer. But the slings and arrows of Hamlet’s outrageous fortune are as distressing as they are familiar. Wimbledon FC walked away from Plough Lane in 1991 and into a groundshare with Crystal Palace. Brighton were forced out of the Goldstone Ground in 1997 and played at Gillingham, then an unfit for purpose athletics stadium. Currently Dagenham and Redbridge are fighting to stay afloat after recently losing the funding of major benefactor and club director Glyn Hopkin. There is nothing new about football clubs being caught between property developers, local councils and financial benefactors. But there’s something about Dulwich Hamlet’s story - a team celebrating its 125th anniversary, top of the league, with an ex-Premier League footballer trying to save the day (more on that later) - which has captured imaginations. Good to meet with supporters of @DulwichHamletFC to discuss plans to address appalling behaviour of developer & save our successful, cherished club - working with @HarrietHarman@peterjohn6@dhstorg@LordRoyKennedy#SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/bXopWxFwdk— Helen Hayes (@helenhayes_) March 6, 2018 So what exactly is going on at Dulwich Hamlet, and who is to blame? Discussions to build on Champion Hill have been ongoing since 2003 when the construction of a Homebase store was mooted. In 2008, owners King's College London sold the freehold of the stadium to property developers DHPD Ltd, which attempted but failed to build apartments on the site. After DHPD went into administration the ground was sold to Hadley Property Group in 2014 for a reported £5.7 million. Ownership of the club itself remained with a man named Nick McCormack, although in writing off the club’s significant debts, which had brought it close to administration, Hadley held the option to buy McCormack’s shares. The current problems began in March 2016, when Hadley revealed plans for an £80m housing development at Champion Hill. As part of the bid it proposed to build a brand new stadium on the adjacent Green Dale Fields, buy the club from McCormack and hand it to the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust. In October that year the CEO of Hadley started a new firm, Meadow Residential, which took on the Champion Hill redevelopment project. So far, so good. Members of the Dulwich Hamlet Supporters’ Trust voted 94 per cent in favour of this proposal, in fact. But the bid fell through. Southwark Council rejected it on the grounds that the proposed new ground would be built on protected Metropolitan Open Land at Green Dale, which had been leased by Dulwich Hamlet until last October. It also said Meadow’s housing plan failed to meet basic requirements for social and affordable housing. Meadow and Southwark Council locked horns, with a series of fiery online statements culminating in a public face-off on the BBC’s Sunday Politics show. Messages to @DulwichHamletFC#DHFC supporters and soulless landlords, from outside the latter’s NY headquarters. You can guess which message is meant for which recipient #SaveDHFCpic.twitter.com/3AKHZgYYqN— Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) March 6, 2018 “We want to see Dulwich Hamlet prosper on their current site,” said Peter John of Southwark Council. “It is absolutely not my desire to see it close,” said Andrew McDaniel of Meadow. “They’ll sort it out,” said many optimistic fans, and life went on. Supporters continued to form a snaking queue around the Sainsbury’s car park next to Champion Hill at 2.45pm on matchdays, Ashley Carew kept nestling free kicks into the top corner of the net, and Dulwich Hamlet's so-called 'Ultras' kept stalking the opposition’s goal - singing their favourite chant: "We're the famous Dulwich Hamlet and we look like Tuscany." Though ownership of the club was still with McCormack, Meadow had been supporting Dulwich Hamlet’s running costs for years - players’ wages and all - at an alleged loss of £170,000 per year. But after discussions with Southwark Council reached a stalemate, Meadow announced it would be terminating its financial support. In response, the supporters’ trust, the Dulwich Hamlet board of directors and a grassroots fundraising group called The 12th Man joined forces to shake buckets, sell raffle tickets and manage the turnstiles at home games. Brighton's directors sold the Goldstone Ground without consulting their supporters in 1997 Credit: Ross Kinnaird/ALLSPORT A ray of hope beamed on Champion Hill in February this year, when it was announced that Rio Ferdinand, who grew up in nearby Peckham and is a friend of Dulwich Hamlet’s manager Gavin Rose, had recently made a £10m bid for Champion Hill Stadium through his affordable housing company Legacy. Alas, Meadow rejected the bid, reportedly asking for a minimum of £13m for the site. Which brings us to this week, when Meadow handed Dulwich a bill of £121,000 for backdated rent. The agreement had always been that Meadow would financially support their tenants, so this came as an unwelcome surprise to the club. Meadow served notice that Dulwich Hamlet could no longer play at Champion Hill Stadium - effective immediately. Then, writing on behalf of Greendales IP LLC, an off-shoot of Meadow, the US-based solicitors Blake Morgan informed the club that their previously un-trademarked name and initials had been trademarked in October last year and that the club could not continue using them. Meadow has since reportedly contacted the supporters’ trust to offer them the trademark of Dulwich Hamlet’s name and initials, with a suggestion made in a press statement to the BBC that it may also be willing to go back on the eviction notice if their requests from Southwark Council are met. What’s next? In a statement to Telegraph Sport, Rio Ferdinand’s Legacy Partners confirmed that their offer is still on the table: “Legacy remain very keen to help Dulwich Hamlet Football Club, Southwark Council and the community in the area. We have asked Meadow for a price in which they will sell the site and they continue to refuse to answer the emails,” it said. “Rio and the Legacy Partners simply wish to move at pace to clean this situation up but we cannot do so unless Meadow respond to us. We are fully funded and ready to help.” In an open letter to Meadow sent this week, London Mayor Sadiq Khan and Southwark’s Peter John put their own offer on the table. They wrote: “Southwark Council is keen to safeguard the future of DHFC at the site and would be happy to consider meeting with Meadow to negotiate to acquire the site itself at market value.” Telegraph Sporthas approached Meadow for comment on its stance on Legacy and Southwark Council’s respective offers, with no response so far. However, in its most recent press statement Meadow reasserted its position, saying: "Meadow owns the Champion Hill site and wishes to develop it to provide much-needed housing, including affordable housing, and a new stadium for the club therefore securing its future at Champion Hill.” From whichever angle you approach the debate, it’s fair to assume that Meadow’s recent heavy-handed actions will not have improved its chances of having its housing development plans approved by Southwark Council. Benji Lanyado, CEO of Hamlet’s shirt sponsor, Picfair, said: “By showing everyone exactly how they operate, they’ve given Southwark even less reason to work with them. Now, surely, the only option they have is to sell - which would be a happy ending of entirely their own making.” Just been past @DulwichHamletFC. Seems like Meadows have started installing fencing around the grounds and putting up warnings to “trespassers”. Also the security guard who asked me to leave pointed out new CCTV cameras. Looks like DHFC will be televised after all. pic.twitter.com/sL7nqhxv9q— 36 Reasons SE5 (@36ReasonsSE5) March 8, 2018 With the debate continuing to rage, club director Tom Cullen has more immediate concerns: where will the club host their next home fixture against Worthing Town on March 17? Cullen told The Telegraph that he and manager Gavin Rose spent Wednesday visiting local clubs that have offered their stadiums as potential ground shares. One option could be local rivals Tooting and Mitcham. A lot of anger has been targeted at Meadow in recent months from Hamlet fans, but it is not the first property developer to buy a stadium for housing, nor will it be the last. Football-pitch-sized land in London is extremely valuable and, as it stands, is the owner’s to do with what they want. To entertain just one footballing metaphor: even the heaviest, most painful of challenges are sometimes permissible by the rule book. Once this debacle has been settled Dulwich Hamlet supporters and indeed all football fans who want to protect the futures of their clubs, should put their rage towards property developers to one side. Instead they must do something productive such as writing to their local MPs. We protect land (like Green Dale), landmarks and cultural institutions at the heart of communities - perhaps now is the time to lobby the government to introduce meaningful legislation that will give similarly protected status to football stadiums. Only then, with a bit of luck, will fans be able to go back to moaning about something really important - like football.
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke Wins 2018 ACC Men's Fencing Championship
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke Wins 2018 ACC Men's Fencing Championship
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke Wins 2018 ACC Men's Fencing Championship
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
Duke Wins 2018 ACC Men's Fencing Championship
Duke captured its first ACC fencing championship in school history, beating 2nd-ranked Notre Dame 19-8. The Blue Devils also had to go through North Carolina and Boston College to take home the title.
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels&#39; first-ever ACC Women&#39;s Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC Wins 2018 ACC Women's Fencing Championship
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels' first-ever ACC Women's Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels&#39; first-ever ACC Women&#39;s Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC Wins 2018 ACC Women's Fencing Championship
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels' first-ever ACC Women's Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels&#39; first-ever ACC Women&#39;s Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC Wins 2018 ACC Women's Fencing Championship
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels' first-ever ACC Women's Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels' first-ever ACC Women's Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
UNC Wins 2018 ACC Women's Fencing Championship
UNC handed No. 1 Notre Dame its first championships loss since joining the ACC, en route to the Tar Heels' first-ever ACC Women's Fencing Title. Georgina Summers was named Championship MVP. North Carolina had to beat both Duke and the Irish in fence-off tie-breakers to capture the crown.
<p>Travis Lindquist, Senior Director, Editorial Photography, Getty Images Photo - Tom Pennington <br>Using a long telephoto lens and a fast shutterspeed Getty Images photographer Tom Pennington was able to capture the incredible speed and control of this skier during the Men’s Alpine Downhill <br>Combined. Seeing the gate contorted after the skier hit it and nearly 100km per hour and still maintaining his form, control, and concentration is a testament to skill these athletes have and the <br>talent the photographer has to capture everything in this split second. <br>Our photographers covering the Alpine skiing are facing extreme temperatures, their day on the mountain often begins before sun up in an effort to scout the course to find the best shooting location with the given course set or gate placement. The gates change for the Downhill and Super G, so the photo positions often need to be changed around. In addition to scouting on course, they are constantly scanning outside the A-net and B-net fencing for possible off course photo positions and Alpine is one of the only sports where they are required to be in their shooting position one hour before competition/training begins and they cannot move from these positions. These photo positions are often no larger than 10&quot;X3&quot;, so there is very little room to move around to stay warm – very challenging!!</p>
Winter Olympics: Photos of the Day

Travis Lindquist, Senior Director, Editorial Photography, Getty Images Photo - Tom Pennington
Using a long telephoto lens and a fast shutterspeed Getty Images photographer Tom Pennington was able to capture the incredible speed and control of this skier during the Men’s Alpine Downhill
Combined. Seeing the gate contorted after the skier hit it and nearly 100km per hour and still maintaining his form, control, and concentration is a testament to skill these athletes have and the
talent the photographer has to capture everything in this split second.
Our photographers covering the Alpine skiing are facing extreme temperatures, their day on the mountain often begins before sun up in an effort to scout the course to find the best shooting location with the given course set or gate placement. The gates change for the Downhill and Super G, so the photo positions often need to be changed around. In addition to scouting on course, they are constantly scanning outside the A-net and B-net fencing for possible off course photo positions and Alpine is one of the only sports where they are required to be in their shooting position one hour before competition/training begins and they cannot move from these positions. These photo positions are often no larger than 10"X3", so there is very little room to move around to stay warm – very challenging!!

<p>Travis Lindquist, Senior Director, Editorial Photography, Getty Images Photo - Tom Pennington.<br>Using a long telephoto lens and a fast shutterspeed, Getty Images photographer Tom Pennington was able to capture the incredible speed and control of this skier during the Men’s Alpine Downhill <br>Combined. Seeing the gate contorted after the skier hit it at nearly 100km per hour and still maintaining his form, control, and concentration is a testament to skill these athletes have and the <br>talent the photographer has to capture everything in this split second.</p><p>Our photographers covering the Alpine skiing are facing extreme temperatures, their day on the mountain often begins before sun up in an effort to scout the course to find the best shooting location with the given course set or gate placement. The gates change for the Downhill and Super G, so the photo positions often need to be changed around.</p><p>In addition to scouting on course, they are constantly scanning outside the A-net and B-net fencing for possible off course photo positions and Alpine is one of the only sports where they are required to be in their shooting position one hour before competition/training begins and they cannot move from these positions.</p><p>These photo positions are often no larger than 10&quot;X3&quot;, so there is very little room to move around to stay warm – very challenging!</p>
Winter Olympics: Day 4

Travis Lindquist, Senior Director, Editorial Photography, Getty Images Photo - Tom Pennington.
Using a long telephoto lens and a fast shutterspeed, Getty Images photographer Tom Pennington was able to capture the incredible speed and control of this skier during the Men’s Alpine Downhill
Combined. Seeing the gate contorted after the skier hit it at nearly 100km per hour and still maintaining his form, control, and concentration is a testament to skill these athletes have and the
talent the photographer has to capture everything in this split second.

Our photographers covering the Alpine skiing are facing extreme temperatures, their day on the mountain often begins before sun up in an effort to scout the course to find the best shooting location with the given course set or gate placement. The gates change for the Downhill and Super G, so the photo positions often need to be changed around.

In addition to scouting on course, they are constantly scanning outside the A-net and B-net fencing for possible off course photo positions and Alpine is one of the only sports where they are required to be in their shooting position one hour before competition/training begins and they cannot move from these positions.

These photo positions are often no larger than 10"X3", so there is very little room to move around to stay warm – very challenging!

<p>Russian skier crashes into fencing in &#39;spectacular fall&#39;</p>
Russian skier crashes into fencing in 'spectacular fall'

Russian skier crashes into fencing in 'spectacular fall'

<p>Russian skier crashes into fencing in &#39;spectacular fall&#39;</p>
Russian skier crashes into fencing in 'spectacular fall'

Russian skier crashes into fencing in 'spectacular fall'

<p>A Korean unity deal for the Pyeongchang Olympics will bring 22 North Korean athletes across the border to South Korea, where they will march as one under a unification flag at the opening ceremony and compete together in one sport.</p><p>In the most symbolic agreement approved Saturday, 12 North Korean women&#39;s hockey players will join their neighbors in a united roster playing in special uniforms with a Korean song as their anthem.</p><p>North Koreans will also compete in figure skating, short track speed skating, Alpine skiing and cross-country skiing after being given exceptional late entries by the International Olympic Committee.</p><p>The North Korean delegation will also include 24 coaches and officials, plus 21 media representatives at the Feb. 9-25 Winter Games.</p><p>The governments of North and South Korea were offered &quot;sincere thanks&quot; by IOC President Thomas Bach announcing the agreement.</p><p>An Olympic deal became possible after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said in a New Year&#39;s speech that a team could cross the border to compete.</p><p>&quot;Such an agreement would have seemed impossible only a few weeks ago,&quot; said Bach, who did not take questions from international media.</p><p>Bach was flanked by Olympic and government officials from both countries at a brief news conference at the Olympic Museum after a 2 1/2-hour meeting at IOC offices nearby.</p><p>North Korea&#39;s delegation, including sports minister Kim Il Guk, did not stay to brief media after signing the agreement for the cameras.</p><p>South Korea&#39;s sports minister, Do Jong-hwan, said through a translator of the accord: &quot;It is very important for the Korean peninsula.&quot;</p><p>When Do was asked if North Korea had given any guarantees not to use the Olympics for political reasons, the translator intervened to say &quot;I don&#39;t think we can take that question.&quot;</p><p>There has been skepticism about Kim Jong Un&#39;s offer. Critics believe he may try to leverage the Olympics to weaken U.S.-led international pressure and sanctions toughened due to North Korea&#39;s prolonged program of nuclear tests and missile launches.</p><p>Bach said the IOC had talked with Olympic officials from both countries separately since 2014 to see if the Pyenongchang Games could be the catalyst for peace-making.</p><p>&quot;This was not an easy journey,&quot; said Bach, who competed in fencing at the Olympics for West Germany when it was divided from its neighbor to the east.</p><p>The deal confirmed Saturday built on a breakthrough agreement reached Wednesday at the Korean neighbors&#39; shared border.</p><p>&quot;The Olympic Games show us what the world could look like, if we were all guided by the Olympic spirit of respect and understanding,&quot; Bach said.</p><p>The united women&#39;s hockey team will be the first time the two Koreas will have joined together in Olympic events. They will play under the Olympic code of &quot;COR&quot; — the French acronym for Korea — and hear the song &quot;Arirang&quot; as a pre-game anthem.</p><p>The roster will include 12 players from the north and 23 from the south. However, to maintain fairness for opponents, only 22 can suit up for each game. At least three must be North Korean, the IOC said.</p><p>North Korea will also send: two figure skaters to compete in the pairs competition; two male speed skaters; two men and one women in cross-country skiing distance events; two men and one woman in Alpine skiing&#39;s slalom and giant slalom races.</p><p>The 22 athletes will not be expected to win a first Winter Games medal for North Korea since 1992, when it got a bronze in women&#39;s short track speed skating.</p>
IOC Says North Korea to Have 22 Athletes in 5 Olympic Sports

A Korean unity deal for the Pyeongchang Olympics will bring 22 North Korean athletes across the border to South Korea, where they will march as one under a unification flag at the opening ceremony and compete together in one sport.

In the most symbolic agreement approved Saturday, 12 North Korean women's hockey players will join their neighbors in a united roster playing in special uniforms with a Korean song as their anthem.

North Koreans will also compete in figure skating, short track speed skating, Alpine skiing and cross-country skiing after being given exceptional late entries by the International Olympic Committee.

The North Korean delegation will also include 24 coaches and officials, plus 21 media representatives at the Feb. 9-25 Winter Games.

The governments of North and South Korea were offered "sincere thanks" by IOC President Thomas Bach announcing the agreement.

An Olympic deal became possible after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said in a New Year's speech that a team could cross the border to compete.

"Such an agreement would have seemed impossible only a few weeks ago," said Bach, who did not take questions from international media.

Bach was flanked by Olympic and government officials from both countries at a brief news conference at the Olympic Museum after a 2 1/2-hour meeting at IOC offices nearby.

North Korea's delegation, including sports minister Kim Il Guk, did not stay to brief media after signing the agreement for the cameras.

South Korea's sports minister, Do Jong-hwan, said through a translator of the accord: "It is very important for the Korean peninsula."

When Do was asked if North Korea had given any guarantees not to use the Olympics for political reasons, the translator intervened to say "I don't think we can take that question."

There has been skepticism about Kim Jong Un's offer. Critics believe he may try to leverage the Olympics to weaken U.S.-led international pressure and sanctions toughened due to North Korea's prolonged program of nuclear tests and missile launches.

Bach said the IOC had talked with Olympic officials from both countries separately since 2014 to see if the Pyenongchang Games could be the catalyst for peace-making.

"This was not an easy journey," said Bach, who competed in fencing at the Olympics for West Germany when it was divided from its neighbor to the east.

The deal confirmed Saturday built on a breakthrough agreement reached Wednesday at the Korean neighbors' shared border.

"The Olympic Games show us what the world could look like, if we were all guided by the Olympic spirit of respect and understanding," Bach said.

The united women's hockey team will be the first time the two Koreas will have joined together in Olympic events. They will play under the Olympic code of "COR" — the French acronym for Korea — and hear the song "Arirang" as a pre-game anthem.

The roster will include 12 players from the north and 23 from the south. However, to maintain fairness for opponents, only 22 can suit up for each game. At least three must be North Korean, the IOC said.

North Korea will also send: two figure skaters to compete in the pairs competition; two male speed skaters; two men and one women in cross-country skiing distance events; two men and one woman in Alpine skiing's slalom and giant slalom races.

The 22 athletes will not be expected to win a first Winter Games medal for North Korea since 1992, when it got a bronze in women's short track speed skating.

<p>The sport court was tucked away in a potholed parking lot, separated from the nearby railroad tracks by chain-link fencing and several banks of trees. It was old, small and relatively unsafe, at least for professional athletes playing touch football. </p><p>Several seasons ago, outside their former training facility in Syosset, N.Y., the New York Islanders began holding spirited 5-on-5 or 7-on-7 games before every practice. The tradition lasted just three weeks, perhaps predictably given the slipshod setting, cut short when defenseman Johnny Boychuk chased after a deep pass and wound up scraped and bruised. “I led him perfectly, but it was right into the fence,” the quarterback admits. “After that, we figured we should focus on our day jobs.”</p><p>This was probably for the best. Who knows how many other injuries might have occurred hunting down Hail Marys from Anders Lee? A decade before he became the <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/nCzvCADrDKIBv5zvsJY_O4?domain=nhl.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:NHL’s third-leading scorer" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">NHL’s third-leading scorer</a>, a net-front monster and deflection master, the 27-year-old left winger was shredding high schoolers in suburban Minneapolis, knocking cowered opponents back into second grade like <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/B43ZCBBvB9c0gNOgTna6YT" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Spike from Little Giants" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Spike from <em>Little Giants</em></a>. Think his 46-goal pace through Wednesday seems gaudy? Try 1,982 passing yards and 1,105 more on the ground as a senior at Edina High School, along with 37 total TDs and Minnesota Gatorade Player of the Year honors … in 10 games.</p><p>Just ask Kim Nelson. He was Edina’s head coach when Lee transferred there in 2007, prior to his junior season, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/sj7QCDkxkWTwRZkRt7Nufv?domain=twincities.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:looking to move closer to home" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">looking to move closer to home</a>. (The school was literally located across the street.) Back then Nelson ran a “fairly sophisticated” air-raid attack that sampled concepts from Urban Meyer, Mike Leach and Gus Malzahn, largely out of the shotgun with wide splits along the offensive line, and contained multi-tiered pass progressions named things like HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT. </p><p>?</p><p>“That style of offense was a little bit new to the Twin Cities area,” Nelson says. “Anders was just the right guy at the right time. He was an innovator, I guess.”</p><p>The thought sounds crazy today, but Lee always felt that football came more natural than hockey. “Getting away from people, seeing down the field, stuff like that,” he says, “I loved it.” As a signal-caller he was fast and physical, equally capable at designed quarterback counters and broken scrambles. Occasionally defensive coordinator Reed Boltmann tried to coax Nelson into letting Lee also line up at safety, the position that he had played before changing schools. “Hey, he’s the franchise,” Nelson replied. “If we lose him, we won’t have much left.”</p><p>“I’d probably compare myself to very lame high school Tebow,” says Lee. &quot;I didn’t run a 4.4 or anything. Just tried to make plays and run and get guys open.&quot;</p><p>Granted, he wasn’t exactly surrounded by scrubs. One of the Hornets&#39; offensive tackles <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/uFmTCERyRWsOQjNQCqkx2W?domain=catamountsports.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:attended Western Carolina" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">attended Western Carolina</a>. The defense was anchored by Zach Budish, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/G2M_CG6A6WhEV9QVtMk4UM?domain=hockeydb.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a second-round draft pick by the Nashville Predators" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a second-round draft pick by the Nashville Predators</a> who spent several years in the minors. But Lee was the offense’s unquestioned leader, organizing team meals, giving younger teammates rides home, staying late to pick up the dummies after practice. Once, during summer 7-on-7s at a nearby high school, Edina trailed by a score with 30 seconds left. “Don’t worry, I got this,” Lee told Boltmann, and then connected on two straight passes to win the game. “He’s got a quiet confidence about him,” Boltmann says. “He was kind of an assistant coach, the guy everybody looked to.”</p><p>Mike Rallis remembers. These days he goes by Riddick Moss, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/HyFkCJ616Whl7oD7TDGizS?domain=wwe.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fledging professional wrestler for WWE NXT" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fledging professional wrestler for WWE NXT</a>, but in ‘07 he was Lee’s best wide receiver. One specific play stands out. Unbeaten through seven games, the Hornets were facing Wayzata for the Classic Lake Conference title. The call was 432 Switch, spread formation, two receivers on either side. Flushed from the pocket by two oncoming blitzers, Lee rolled to his left, flipped his hips and chucked a dime to a diving Rallis, who was double-covered on a post route. They both still remember what the television announcer said:</p><p><em>AT THE WAYZATA 37 … PLAY ACTION … LEE ... STANDING … TAKES A HIT AFTER HE THROWS ... AND IT’S CAUGHT BY RALLIS! WHAT A CATCH!</em></p><p>In an alternate universe—one without ice rinks, perhaps—Rallis figures that Lee would’ve become a legitimate dual-threat Division I quarterback. Maybe more. </p><p>”When I’m trying to do my armchair scouting of the NFL draft or something like that, I try to determine if I can picture a QB being a franchise guy,” says Rallis, who later played at the University of Minnesota and earned a tryout with the Dolphins. “He’s the kind of guy that you would build a franchise around, 100 percent. Just the way he carries himself, the way he works, the way he commits himself to the team and the game ... When I watch Russell Wilson, I see a lot of similarities in the way [Anders] would scramble and use his athleticism.&quot;</p><p>Plenty of football programs showed interest anyway. Northern Illinois, Air Force and Wyoming called. The hometown Gophers invited Lee to their junior day, where he recalls watching film with their offensive coordinator. Harvard offered him opportunities to play both football and hockey, which he found “really appealing. But that would’ve just been absurd, and probably not doable. My talents were not going to get me further than college football, and I’m okay with that.”</p><p>In his mind, the choice was easy. “My route was always through hockey,” he says. But NHL teams were concerned. On the second day of the the 2008 draft, his first year of eligibility, Lee was watching from a friend’s basement—and wearing a Chicago Blackhawks T-shirt, he recalls—when his phone rang. It was former Islanders assistant GM Ryan Jankowski, calling from their table on the draft floor, wondering whether Lee planned to continue playing football as a senior at Edina. Yes, Lee replied. He was the captain and the quarterback. He couldn’t quit now.</p><p>“I think this was a pretty unique case,” Islanders GM Garth Snow says, explaining why his and every other team passed on Lee that June, “and I think that’s what scared most teams away.”</p><p>Fortunately, the Islanders had another crack. <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/QET3CKrGr9FPjkGjF4S4fz?domain=thedraftanalyst.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Ranked 118th among North American skaters by NHL central scouting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Ranked 118th among North American skaters by NHL central scouting</a>, 117 spots behind future linemate John Tavares. Lee went in the <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/NrhlCL9G9WFVJ2ZJtJUtDp?domain=hockeydb.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:sixth round and No. 152" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">sixth round and No. 152</a>. (As the pick was announced, he was busy working a job with Cutco, making cold calls to sell knives.) “Powerful, strong, really raw,” Snow says. “The biggest question mark was his skating. We just felt there was enough character and drive to improve.”</p><p>Their faith has been rewarded. With 26 goals in 46 games this season, two behind Alex Ovechkin for the league lead, Lee counts among the NHL’s preeminent power forwards; all but three of those strikes have occurred below the faceoff hashmarks, largely on tip-ins, redirections, second-chance efforts and rebound cleanups. He certainly looks the part, 6-foot-3 and 231 pounds with swooped hair and a square jawline, like Johnny Bravo on skates. (One assumes this makes Tavares, as team captain, Johnny Alpha.) </p><p>“Takes a lot of energy to play against Anders, I’d imagine,” coach Doug Weight says. “It’s a good thing for his linemates as well. [Opponents] use a lot of fuel up trying to prevent him from getting to the paint or getting in the goalie’s eyes. It’s a distraction. It’s a fatigue factor for the other teams. He knows where his fish is fried. I can use four more cliches if you want. He knows what’s going to make his money.”</p><p>Drawing parallels between Lee’s football background and his on-ice presence isn’t difficult. “He hits like a lineman,” Weight says. “He comes in with these big claws and smashes you against the boards.” Watch how he digs into position around the crease, massive legs bent and arms ready, like he’s about to execute 432 Switch from the shotgun again. Or how he out-muscled Devils defenseman John Moore toward a loose puck in the first period Tuesday night, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/KgyNCM8X8WFDQYAQi2uffV?domain=nhl.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bolting toward paydirt to put the Islanders ahead 1-0" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bolting toward paydirt to put the Islanders ahead 1-0</a>. “At that point everyone was behind me,” Lee said after. “I don’t get that many breakaways in hockey.”</p><p>He misses football sometimes, but the sport finds ways to hang around. It was an ongoing joke among the Notre Dame men’s hockey team that Lee should’ve grabbed a playbook during his freshman year, because the FIghting Irish were hurting for quarterbacks <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/gSN_CNkGkWTJ2pG2UERu_f?domain=twincities.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:after starter Dayne Crist suffered a knee injury." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">after starter Dayne Crist suffered a knee injury.</a> One summer, Lee told Nelson that he was coming back home to Edina. “I’ll meet you, we’ll talk some football,” Nelson said. “A little HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT sounds good to me,” Lee texted back. As a native Minnesotan, he is obviously rooting for the Vikings <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/ySSqCOYGY6Hl6ky6TmpVOv?domain=si.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:throughout their present miracle run" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">throughout their present miracle run</a>.</p><p>Rallis still thinks about their “magical” season together too. Last week, the wrestler was driving with Levi Cooper, who <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/YAwvCPNGNWu97nk7txQVBk?domain=wwe.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:performs under the name Tucker Knight" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">performs under the name Tucker Knight</a>, en route to another show on their circuit. Somehow, the conversation landed on high school football. Out spilled the decade-old memories—how Rallis had called Lee that summer, hoping to recruit him to Edina before the latter eventually transferred; how Lee not only dropped one reverse pass from Rallis but batted the ball into the air so it got picked off; how he hurled that perfect pass to help beat Wayzata for the conference title, preserving Edina&#39;s undefeated year.</p><p>“That’s my quarterback,” Rallis says. “He’ll always be my quarterback.”</p>
From the Gridiron to the Ice Rink, Anders Lee Continues to Rack Up Points

The sport court was tucked away in a potholed parking lot, separated from the nearby railroad tracks by chain-link fencing and several banks of trees. It was old, small and relatively unsafe, at least for professional athletes playing touch football.

Several seasons ago, outside their former training facility in Syosset, N.Y., the New York Islanders began holding spirited 5-on-5 or 7-on-7 games before every practice. The tradition lasted just three weeks, perhaps predictably given the slipshod setting, cut short when defenseman Johnny Boychuk chased after a deep pass and wound up scraped and bruised. “I led him perfectly, but it was right into the fence,” the quarterback admits. “After that, we figured we should focus on our day jobs.”

This was probably for the best. Who knows how many other injuries might have occurred hunting down Hail Marys from Anders Lee? A decade before he became the NHL’s third-leading scorer, a net-front monster and deflection master, the 27-year-old left winger was shredding high schoolers in suburban Minneapolis, knocking cowered opponents back into second grade like Spike from Little Giants. Think his 46-goal pace through Wednesday seems gaudy? Try 1,982 passing yards and 1,105 more on the ground as a senior at Edina High School, along with 37 total TDs and Minnesota Gatorade Player of the Year honors … in 10 games.

Just ask Kim Nelson. He was Edina’s head coach when Lee transferred there in 2007, prior to his junior season, looking to move closer to home. (The school was literally located across the street.) Back then Nelson ran a “fairly sophisticated” air-raid attack that sampled concepts from Urban Meyer, Mike Leach and Gus Malzahn, largely out of the shotgun with wide splits along the offensive line, and contained multi-tiered pass progressions named things like HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT.

?

“That style of offense was a little bit new to the Twin Cities area,” Nelson says. “Anders was just the right guy at the right time. He was an innovator, I guess.”

The thought sounds crazy today, but Lee always felt that football came more natural than hockey. “Getting away from people, seeing down the field, stuff like that,” he says, “I loved it.” As a signal-caller he was fast and physical, equally capable at designed quarterback counters and broken scrambles. Occasionally defensive coordinator Reed Boltmann tried to coax Nelson into letting Lee also line up at safety, the position that he had played before changing schools. “Hey, he’s the franchise,” Nelson replied. “If we lose him, we won’t have much left.”

“I’d probably compare myself to very lame high school Tebow,” says Lee. "I didn’t run a 4.4 or anything. Just tried to make plays and run and get guys open."

Granted, he wasn’t exactly surrounded by scrubs. One of the Hornets' offensive tackles attended Western Carolina. The defense was anchored by Zach Budish, a second-round draft pick by the Nashville Predators who spent several years in the minors. But Lee was the offense’s unquestioned leader, organizing team meals, giving younger teammates rides home, staying late to pick up the dummies after practice. Once, during summer 7-on-7s at a nearby high school, Edina trailed by a score with 30 seconds left. “Don’t worry, I got this,” Lee told Boltmann, and then connected on two straight passes to win the game. “He’s got a quiet confidence about him,” Boltmann says. “He was kind of an assistant coach, the guy everybody looked to.”

Mike Rallis remembers. These days he goes by Riddick Moss, fledging professional wrestler for WWE NXT, but in ‘07 he was Lee’s best wide receiver. One specific play stands out. Unbeaten through seven games, the Hornets were facing Wayzata for the Classic Lake Conference title. The call was 432 Switch, spread formation, two receivers on either side. Flushed from the pocket by two oncoming blitzers, Lee rolled to his left, flipped his hips and chucked a dime to a diving Rallis, who was double-covered on a post route. They both still remember what the television announcer said:

AT THE WAYZATA 37 … PLAY ACTION … LEE ... STANDING … TAKES A HIT AFTER HE THROWS ... AND IT’S CAUGHT BY RALLIS! WHAT A CATCH!

In an alternate universe—one without ice rinks, perhaps—Rallis figures that Lee would’ve become a legitimate dual-threat Division I quarterback. Maybe more.

”When I’m trying to do my armchair scouting of the NFL draft or something like that, I try to determine if I can picture a QB being a franchise guy,” says Rallis, who later played at the University of Minnesota and earned a tryout with the Dolphins. “He’s the kind of guy that you would build a franchise around, 100 percent. Just the way he carries himself, the way he works, the way he commits himself to the team and the game ... When I watch Russell Wilson, I see a lot of similarities in the way [Anders] would scramble and use his athleticism."

Plenty of football programs showed interest anyway. Northern Illinois, Air Force and Wyoming called. The hometown Gophers invited Lee to their junior day, where he recalls watching film with their offensive coordinator. Harvard offered him opportunities to play both football and hockey, which he found “really appealing. But that would’ve just been absurd, and probably not doable. My talents were not going to get me further than college football, and I’m okay with that.”

In his mind, the choice was easy. “My route was always through hockey,” he says. But NHL teams were concerned. On the second day of the the 2008 draft, his first year of eligibility, Lee was watching from a friend’s basement—and wearing a Chicago Blackhawks T-shirt, he recalls—when his phone rang. It was former Islanders assistant GM Ryan Jankowski, calling from their table on the draft floor, wondering whether Lee planned to continue playing football as a senior at Edina. Yes, Lee replied. He was the captain and the quarterback. He couldn’t quit now.

“I think this was a pretty unique case,” Islanders GM Garth Snow says, explaining why his and every other team passed on Lee that June, “and I think that’s what scared most teams away.”

Fortunately, the Islanders had another crack. Ranked 118th among North American skaters by NHL central scouting, 117 spots behind future linemate John Tavares. Lee went in the sixth round and No. 152. (As the pick was announced, he was busy working a job with Cutco, making cold calls to sell knives.) “Powerful, strong, really raw,” Snow says. “The biggest question mark was his skating. We just felt there was enough character and drive to improve.”

Their faith has been rewarded. With 26 goals in 46 games this season, two behind Alex Ovechkin for the league lead, Lee counts among the NHL’s preeminent power forwards; all but three of those strikes have occurred below the faceoff hashmarks, largely on tip-ins, redirections, second-chance efforts and rebound cleanups. He certainly looks the part, 6-foot-3 and 231 pounds with swooped hair and a square jawline, like Johnny Bravo on skates. (One assumes this makes Tavares, as team captain, Johnny Alpha.)

“Takes a lot of energy to play against Anders, I’d imagine,” coach Doug Weight says. “It’s a good thing for his linemates as well. [Opponents] use a lot of fuel up trying to prevent him from getting to the paint or getting in the goalie’s eyes. It’s a distraction. It’s a fatigue factor for the other teams. He knows where his fish is fried. I can use four more cliches if you want. He knows what’s going to make his money.”

Drawing parallels between Lee’s football background and his on-ice presence isn’t difficult. “He hits like a lineman,” Weight says. “He comes in with these big claws and smashes you against the boards.” Watch how he digs into position around the crease, massive legs bent and arms ready, like he’s about to execute 432 Switch from the shotgun again. Or how he out-muscled Devils defenseman John Moore toward a loose puck in the first period Tuesday night, bolting toward paydirt to put the Islanders ahead 1-0. “At that point everyone was behind me,” Lee said after. “I don’t get that many breakaways in hockey.”

He misses football sometimes, but the sport finds ways to hang around. It was an ongoing joke among the Notre Dame men’s hockey team that Lee should’ve grabbed a playbook during his freshman year, because the FIghting Irish were hurting for quarterbacks after starter Dayne Crist suffered a knee injury. One summer, Lee told Nelson that he was coming back home to Edina. “I’ll meet you, we’ll talk some football,” Nelson said. “A little HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT sounds good to me,” Lee texted back. As a native Minnesotan, he is obviously rooting for the Vikings throughout their present miracle run.

Rallis still thinks about their “magical” season together too. Last week, the wrestler was driving with Levi Cooper, who performs under the name Tucker Knight, en route to another show on their circuit. Somehow, the conversation landed on high school football. Out spilled the decade-old memories—how Rallis had called Lee that summer, hoping to recruit him to Edina before the latter eventually transferred; how Lee not only dropped one reverse pass from Rallis but batted the ball into the air so it got picked off; how he hurled that perfect pass to help beat Wayzata for the conference title, preserving Edina's undefeated year.

“That’s my quarterback,” Rallis says. “He’ll always be my quarterback.”

<p>The sport court was tucked away in a potholed parking lot, separated from the nearby railroad tracks by chain-link fencing and several banks of trees. It was old, small and relatively unsafe, at least for professional athletes playing touch football. </p><p>Several seasons ago, outside their former training facility in Syosset, N.Y., the New York Islanders began holding spirited 5-on-5 or 7-on-7 games before every practice. The tradition lasted just three weeks, predictable given the slipshod setting, cut short when defenseman Johnny Boychuk chased after a deep pass and wound up scraped and bruised. “I led him perfectly, but it was right into the fence,” the quarterback admits. “After that, we figured we should focus on our day jobs.”</p><p>This was probably for the best. Who knows how many other injuries might have occurred hunting down Hail Marys from Anders Lee? A decade before he became the <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/nCzvCADrDKIBv5zvsJY_O4?domain=nhl.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:NHL’s third-leading scorer" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">NHL’s third-leading scorer</a>, a net-front monster and deflection master, the 27-year-old left winger was shredding high schoolers in suburban Minneapolis, knocking cowered opponents back into second grade like <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JutRmiFTZsE" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Spike from Little Giants" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Spike from <em>Little Giants</em></a>. Think his 46-goal pace through Wednesday seems gaudy? Try 1,982 passing yards and 1,105 more on the ground as a senior at Edina High School, along with 37 total TDs and Minnesota Gatorade Player of the Year honors … in 10 games.</p><p>Just ask Kim Nelson. He was Edina’s head coach when Lee transferred there in 2007, prior to his junior season, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/sj7QCDkxkWTwRZkRt7Nufv?domain=twincities.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:looking to move closer to home" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">looking to move closer to home</a>. (The school was literally located across the street.) Back then Nelson ran a “fairly sophisticated” air-raid attack that sampled concepts from Urban Meyer, Mike Leach and Gus Malzahn, largely out of the shotgun with wide splits along the offensive line, and contained multi-tiered pass progressions named things like HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT. </p><p>“That style of offense was a little bit new to the Twin Cities area,” Nelson says. “Anders was just the right guy at the right time. He was an innovator, I guess.”</p><p>The thought sounds crazy today, but Lee always felt that football came more natural than hockey. “Getting away from people, seeing down the field, stuff like that,” he says, “I loved it.” As a signal-caller he was fast and physical, equally capable at designed quarterback counters and broken scrambles. Occasionally defensive coordinator Reed Boltmann tried to coax Nelson into letting Lee also line up at safety, the position that he had played before changing schools. “Hey, he’s the franchise,” Nelson replied. “If we lose him, we won’t have much left.”</p><p>“I’d probably compare myself to very lame high school Tebow,” says Lee. &quot;I didn’t run a 4.4 or anything. Just tried to make plays and run and get guys open.&quot;</p><p>Granted, he wasn’t exactly surrounded by scrubs. One of the Hornets&#39; offensive tackles <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/uFmTCERyRWsOQjNQCqkx2W?domain=catamountsports.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:attended Western Carolina" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">attended Western Carolina</a>. The defense was anchored by Zach Budish, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/G2M_CG6A6WhEV9QVtMk4UM?domain=hockeydb.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a second-round draft pick by the Nashville Predators" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a second-round draft pick by the Nashville Predators</a> who spent several years in the minors. But Lee was the offense’s unquestioned leader, organizing team meals, giving younger teammates rides home, staying late to pick up the dummies after practice. Once, during summer 7-on-7s at a nearby high school, Edina trailed by a score with 30 seconds left. “Don’t worry, I got this,” Lee told Boltmann, and then connected on two straight passes to win the game. “He’s got a quiet confidence about him,” Boltmann says. “He was kind of an assistant coach, the guy everybody looked to.”</p><p>?</p><p>Mike Rallis remembers. These days he goes by Riddick Moss, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/HyFkCJ616Whl7oD7TDGizS?domain=wwe.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fledging professional wrestler for WWE NXT" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fledging professional wrestler for WWE NXT</a>, but in ‘07 he was Lee’s best wide receiver. One specific play stands out. Unbeaten through seven games, the Hornets were facing Wayzata for the Classic Lake Conference title. The call was 432 Switch, spread formation, two receivers on either side. Flushed from the pocket by two oncoming blitzers, Lee rolled to his left, flipped his hips and chucked a dime to a diving Rallis, who was double-covered on a post route. They both still remember what the television announcer said:</p><p><em>AT THE WAYZATA 37 … PLAY ACTION … LEE ... STANDING … TAKES A HIT AFTER HE THROWS ... AND IT’S CAUGHT BY RALLIS! WHAT A CATCH!</em></p><p>In an alternate universe—one without ice rinks, perhaps—Rallis figures that Lee would’ve become a legitimate dual-threat Division I quarterback. Maybe more. </p><p>”When I’m trying to do my armchair scouting of the NFL draft or something like that, I try to determine if I can picture a QB being a franchise guy,” says Rallis, who later played at the University of Minnesota and earned a tryout with the Dolphins. “He’s the kind of guy that you would build a franchise around, 100 percent. Just the way he carries himself, the way he works, the way he commits himself to the team and the game ... When I watch Russell Wilson, I see a lot of similarities in the way [Anders] would scramble and use his athleticism.&quot;</p><p>Plenty of football programs showed interest anyway. Northern Illinois, Air Force and Wyoming called. The hometown Gophers invited Lee to their junior day, where he recalls watching film with their offensive coordinator. Harvard offered him opportunities to play both football and hockey, which he found “really appealing. But that would’ve just been absurd, and probably not doable. My talents were not going to get me further than college football, and I’m okay with that.”</p><p>In his mind, the choice was easy. “My route was always through hockey,” he says. But NHL teams were concerned. On the second day of the the 2008 draft, his first year of eligibility, Lee was watching from a friend’s basement—and wearing a Chicago Blackhawks T-shirt, he recalls—when his phone rang. It was former Islanders assistant GM Ryan Jankowski, calling from their table on the draft floor, wondering whether Lee planned to continue playing football as a senior at Edina. Yes, Lee replied. He was the captain and the quarterback. He couldn’t quit now.</p><p>“I think this was a pretty unique case,” Islanders GM Garth Snow says, explaining why his and every other team passed on Lee that June, “and I think that’s what scared most teams away.”</p><p>Fortunately, the Islanders had another crack. <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/QET3CKrGr9FPjkGjF4S4fz?domain=thedraftanalyst.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Ranked 118th among North American skaters by NHL central scouting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Ranked 118th among North American skaters by NHL central scouting</a>, 117 spots behind future linemate John Tavares. Lee went in the <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/NrhlCL9G9WFVJ2ZJtJUtDp?domain=hockeydb.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:sixth round and No. 152" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">sixth round and No. 152</a>. (As the pick was announced, he was busy working a job with Cutco, making cold calls to sell knives.) “Powerful, strong, really raw,” Snow says. “The biggest question mark was his skating. We just felt there was enough character and drive to improve.”</p><p>Their faith has been rewarded. With 26 goals in 46 games this season, two behind Alex Ovechkin for the league lead, Lee counts among the NHL’s preeminent power forwards; all but three of those strikes have occurred below the faceoff hashmarks, largely on tip-ins, redirections, second-chance efforts and rebound cleanups. He certainly looks the part, 6-foot-3 and 231 pounds with swooped hair and a square jawline, like Johnny Bravo on skates. (One assumes this makes Tavares, as team captain, Johnny Alpha.) </p><p>“Takes a lot of energy to play against Anders, I’d imagine,” coach Doug Weight says. “It’s a good thing for his linemates as well. [Opponents] use a lot of fuel up trying to prevent him from getting to the paint or getting in the goalie’s eyes. It’s a distraction. It’s a fatigue factor for the other teams. He knows where his fish is fried. I can use four more cliches if you want. He knows what’s going to make his money.”</p><p>Drawing parallels between Lee’s football background and his on-ice presence isn’t difficult. “He hits like a lineman,” Weight says. “He comes in with these big claws and smashes you against the boards.” Watch how he digs into position around the crease, massive legs bent and arms ready, like he’s about to execute 432 Switch from the shotgun again. Or how he out-muscled Devils defenseman John Moore toward a loose puck in the first period Tuesday night, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/KgyNCM8X8WFDQYAQi2uffV?domain=nhl.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bolting toward paydirt to put the Islanders ahead 1-0" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bolting toward paydirt to put the Islanders ahead 1-0</a>. “At that point everyone was behind me,” Lee said after. “I don’t get that many breakaways in hockey.”</p><p>He misses football sometimes, but the sport finds ways to hang around. As a native Minnesotan, he is obviously rooting for the Vikings throughout their present miracle run. It was an ongoing joke among the Notre Dame men’s hockey team that Lee should’ve grabbed a playbook during his freshman year, because the Fighting Irish were hurting for quarterbacks <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/gSN_CNkGkWTJ2pG2UERu_f?domain=twincities.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:after starter Dayne Crist suffered a knee injury." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">after starter Dayne Crist suffered a knee injury.</a> One summer, Lee told Nelson that he was coming back home to Edina. “I’ll meet you, we’ll talk some football,” Nelson said. “A little HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT sounds good to me,” Lee texted back. As a native Minnesotan, he is obviously rooting for the Vikings <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/ySSqCOYGY6Hl6ky6TmpVOv?domain=si.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:throughout their present miracle run" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">throughout their present miracle run</a>.</p><p>Rallis still thinks about their “magical” season together too. Last week, the wrestler was driving with Levi Cooper, who <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/YAwvCPNGNWu97nk7txQVBk?domain=wwe.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:performs under the name Tucker Knight" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">performs under the name Tucker Knight</a>, en route to another show on their circuit. Somehow, the conversation landed on high school football. Out spilled the decade-old memories—how Rallis had called Lee that summer, hoping to recruit him to Edina before the latter eventually transferred; how Lee once showed a brief shred of gridiron mortality by dropping a reverse pass from Rallis that got intercepted; how he later clinched the conference title against Wayzata by swatting down a deep ball at safety to preserve Edina&#39;s undefeated year.</p><p>“That’s my quarterback,” Rallis says. “He’ll always be my quarterback.”</p>
From the Gridiron to the Ice Rink, Anders Lee Continues to Rack Up Points

The sport court was tucked away in a potholed parking lot, separated from the nearby railroad tracks by chain-link fencing and several banks of trees. It was old, small and relatively unsafe, at least for professional athletes playing touch football.

Several seasons ago, outside their former training facility in Syosset, N.Y., the New York Islanders began holding spirited 5-on-5 or 7-on-7 games before every practice. The tradition lasted just three weeks, predictable given the slipshod setting, cut short when defenseman Johnny Boychuk chased after a deep pass and wound up scraped and bruised. “I led him perfectly, but it was right into the fence,” the quarterback admits. “After that, we figured we should focus on our day jobs.”

This was probably for the best. Who knows how many other injuries might have occurred hunting down Hail Marys from Anders Lee? A decade before he became the NHL’s third-leading scorer, a net-front monster and deflection master, the 27-year-old left winger was shredding high schoolers in suburban Minneapolis, knocking cowered opponents back into second grade like Spike from Little Giants. Think his 46-goal pace through Wednesday seems gaudy? Try 1,982 passing yards and 1,105 more on the ground as a senior at Edina High School, along with 37 total TDs and Minnesota Gatorade Player of the Year honors … in 10 games.

Just ask Kim Nelson. He was Edina’s head coach when Lee transferred there in 2007, prior to his junior season, looking to move closer to home. (The school was literally located across the street.) Back then Nelson ran a “fairly sophisticated” air-raid attack that sampled concepts from Urban Meyer, Mike Leach and Gus Malzahn, largely out of the shotgun with wide splits along the offensive line, and contained multi-tiered pass progressions named things like HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT.

“That style of offense was a little bit new to the Twin Cities area,” Nelson says. “Anders was just the right guy at the right time. He was an innovator, I guess.”

The thought sounds crazy today, but Lee always felt that football came more natural than hockey. “Getting away from people, seeing down the field, stuff like that,” he says, “I loved it.” As a signal-caller he was fast and physical, equally capable at designed quarterback counters and broken scrambles. Occasionally defensive coordinator Reed Boltmann tried to coax Nelson into letting Lee also line up at safety, the position that he had played before changing schools. “Hey, he’s the franchise,” Nelson replied. “If we lose him, we won’t have much left.”

“I’d probably compare myself to very lame high school Tebow,” says Lee. "I didn’t run a 4.4 or anything. Just tried to make plays and run and get guys open."

Granted, he wasn’t exactly surrounded by scrubs. One of the Hornets' offensive tackles attended Western Carolina. The defense was anchored by Zach Budish, a second-round draft pick by the Nashville Predators who spent several years in the minors. But Lee was the offense’s unquestioned leader, organizing team meals, giving younger teammates rides home, staying late to pick up the dummies after practice. Once, during summer 7-on-7s at a nearby high school, Edina trailed by a score with 30 seconds left. “Don’t worry, I got this,” Lee told Boltmann, and then connected on two straight passes to win the game. “He’s got a quiet confidence about him,” Boltmann says. “He was kind of an assistant coach, the guy everybody looked to.”

?

Mike Rallis remembers. These days he goes by Riddick Moss, fledging professional wrestler for WWE NXT, but in ‘07 he was Lee’s best wide receiver. One specific play stands out. Unbeaten through seven games, the Hornets were facing Wayzata for the Classic Lake Conference title. The call was 432 Switch, spread formation, two receivers on either side. Flushed from the pocket by two oncoming blitzers, Lee rolled to his left, flipped his hips and chucked a dime to a diving Rallis, who was double-covered on a post route. They both still remember what the television announcer said:

AT THE WAYZATA 37 … PLAY ACTION … LEE ... STANDING … TAKES A HIT AFTER HE THROWS ... AND IT’S CAUGHT BY RALLIS! WHAT A CATCH!

In an alternate universe—one without ice rinks, perhaps—Rallis figures that Lee would’ve become a legitimate dual-threat Division I quarterback. Maybe more.

”When I’m trying to do my armchair scouting of the NFL draft or something like that, I try to determine if I can picture a QB being a franchise guy,” says Rallis, who later played at the University of Minnesota and earned a tryout with the Dolphins. “He’s the kind of guy that you would build a franchise around, 100 percent. Just the way he carries himself, the way he works, the way he commits himself to the team and the game ... When I watch Russell Wilson, I see a lot of similarities in the way [Anders] would scramble and use his athleticism."

Plenty of football programs showed interest anyway. Northern Illinois, Air Force and Wyoming called. The hometown Gophers invited Lee to their junior day, where he recalls watching film with their offensive coordinator. Harvard offered him opportunities to play both football and hockey, which he found “really appealing. But that would’ve just been absurd, and probably not doable. My talents were not going to get me further than college football, and I’m okay with that.”

In his mind, the choice was easy. “My route was always through hockey,” he says. But NHL teams were concerned. On the second day of the the 2008 draft, his first year of eligibility, Lee was watching from a friend’s basement—and wearing a Chicago Blackhawks T-shirt, he recalls—when his phone rang. It was former Islanders assistant GM Ryan Jankowski, calling from their table on the draft floor, wondering whether Lee planned to continue playing football as a senior at Edina. Yes, Lee replied. He was the captain and the quarterback. He couldn’t quit now.

“I think this was a pretty unique case,” Islanders GM Garth Snow says, explaining why his and every other team passed on Lee that June, “and I think that’s what scared most teams away.”

Fortunately, the Islanders had another crack. Ranked 118th among North American skaters by NHL central scouting, 117 spots behind future linemate John Tavares. Lee went in the sixth round and No. 152. (As the pick was announced, he was busy working a job with Cutco, making cold calls to sell knives.) “Powerful, strong, really raw,” Snow says. “The biggest question mark was his skating. We just felt there was enough character and drive to improve.”

Their faith has been rewarded. With 26 goals in 46 games this season, two behind Alex Ovechkin for the league lead, Lee counts among the NHL’s preeminent power forwards; all but three of those strikes have occurred below the faceoff hashmarks, largely on tip-ins, redirections, second-chance efforts and rebound cleanups. He certainly looks the part, 6-foot-3 and 231 pounds with swooped hair and a square jawline, like Johnny Bravo on skates. (One assumes this makes Tavares, as team captain, Johnny Alpha.)

“Takes a lot of energy to play against Anders, I’d imagine,” coach Doug Weight says. “It’s a good thing for his linemates as well. [Opponents] use a lot of fuel up trying to prevent him from getting to the paint or getting in the goalie’s eyes. It’s a distraction. It’s a fatigue factor for the other teams. He knows where his fish is fried. I can use four more cliches if you want. He knows what’s going to make his money.”

Drawing parallels between Lee’s football background and his on-ice presence isn’t difficult. “He hits like a lineman,” Weight says. “He comes in with these big claws and smashes you against the boards.” Watch how he digs into position around the crease, massive legs bent and arms ready, like he’s about to execute 432 Switch from the shotgun again. Or how he out-muscled Devils defenseman John Moore toward a loose puck in the first period Tuesday night, bolting toward paydirt to put the Islanders ahead 1-0. “At that point everyone was behind me,” Lee said after. “I don’t get that many breakaways in hockey.”

He misses football sometimes, but the sport finds ways to hang around. As a native Minnesotan, he is obviously rooting for the Vikings throughout their present miracle run. It was an ongoing joke among the Notre Dame men’s hockey team that Lee should’ve grabbed a playbook during his freshman year, because the Fighting Irish were hurting for quarterbacks after starter Dayne Crist suffered a knee injury. One summer, Lee told Nelson that he was coming back home to Edina. “I’ll meet you, we’ll talk some football,” Nelson said. “A little HOT SHALLOW DIG SHOOT sounds good to me,” Lee texted back. As a native Minnesotan, he is obviously rooting for the Vikings throughout their present miracle run.

Rallis still thinks about their “magical” season together too. Last week, the wrestler was driving with Levi Cooper, who performs under the name Tucker Knight, en route to another show on their circuit. Somehow, the conversation landed on high school football. Out spilled the decade-old memories—how Rallis had called Lee that summer, hoping to recruit him to Edina before the latter eventually transferred; how Lee once showed a brief shred of gridiron mortality by dropping a reverse pass from Rallis that got intercepted; how he later clinched the conference title against Wayzata by swatting down a deep ball at safety to preserve Edina's undefeated year.

“That’s my quarterback,” Rallis says. “He’ll always be my quarterback.”

London Irish director of rugby Nick Kennedy says Premiership ring-fencing will be to England’s benefit.
London Irish director wants scrapping of Premiership promotion and relegation
London Irish director of rugby Nick Kennedy says Premiership ring-fencing will be to England’s benefit.
<p>How was <strong>Tom Savage</strong> allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?</p><p>When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It&#39;s up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player&#39;s speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question. </p><p>Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1494620-stevan-ridleys-concussion-biomechanics-of-his-injury-fencing-response" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fencing response" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fencing response</a>, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn&#39;t it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can&#39;t be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach <strong>Bill O&#39;Brien</strong> intimated that head Houston trainer <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> had not seen the hit and Savage&#39;s reaction before making his diagnosis; O&#39;Brien <a href="https://twitter.com/AaronWilson_NFL/status/940235133415776259" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> Monday, &quot;With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don&#39;t believe that <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> would have allowed that player back in the game.&quot; So maybe that&#39;s where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.</p><p>The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed. </p><p><strong>Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet?</strong> <a href="https://www.si.com/static/newsletter/signup" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle</em></a><em>.</em></p><h3><strong>HOT READS</strong></h3><p><strong>NOW ON THE MMQB: </strong>Conor Orr <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/carson-wentz-torn-acl-injury-philadelphia-eagles?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stacks up" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stacks up</a> the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/ryan-shazier-injury-pittsburgh-steelers-replacements-patriots-game?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:studies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">studies</a> the Steelers without <strong>Ryan Shazier</strong> ... Peter King <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/week-14-awards-jaguars-fans-seahawks-player-mmqb?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hands out" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hands out</a> awards ... <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and more</a>. </p><p><b>LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB:</b> Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Stay tuned" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Stay tuned</a>.</p><h3><b>PRESS COVERAGE</b></h3><p><strong>1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. </strong>With <strong>Rob Gronkowski</strong> suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference&#39;s top seed.</p><p><strong>2. Carson Wentz </strong>had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on <a href="https://twitter.com/cj_wentz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&#38;ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.philly.com%2Fphilly%2Fsports%2Fcarson-wentz-twitter-torn-acl-philadelphia-eagles-rams-20171211.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Twitter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Twitter</a>. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/health/carson-wentz-acl-tear-recovery-time-philadelphia-eagles-20171212.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:explains" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">explains</a> what&#39;s in store for Wentz now. </p><p><strong>3.</strong> During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end <strong>Zach Miller</strong> <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/g00/sports/football/bears/ct-spt-bears-zach-miller-wiederer-20171211-story.html?i10c.encReferrer=" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> he&#39;s undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He&#39;s not sure if he&#39;ll ever play football again; for now he&#39;s killing time playing Madden.</p><p><strong>4. </strong>The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday&#39;s game, but that doesn&#39;t mean <strong>Pete Carroll</strong> is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/sports/seahawks/seahawks-coach-pete-carroll-on-end-of-game-melee-at-jacksonville-everybody-is-remorseful-we-dont-want-to-play-like-that/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carroll said Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carroll said Monday</a>. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’</p><p><strong>5.</strong> With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will <a href="http://www.startribune.com/vikings-suddenly-unstable-offensive-line-feels-all-too-familiar-no-early-speculation-on-riley-reiff-s-status/463496723/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:offensive line instability" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">offensive line instability</a>, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?</p><p><strong>6. </strong>The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they&#39;re still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, <strong>Jim Caldwell </strong>seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he <a href="https://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2017/12/11/detroit-lions-jim-caldwell-team-resiliency/942753001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:deflected credit" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">deflected credit</a> for Detroit&#39;s resiliency of late.</p><p><strong>7. </strong>In Esquire, <strong>Richard Sherman</strong> gave <a href="http://www.esquire.com/sports/a14323331/richard-sherman-nfl-protests-kaepernick-trump/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a wide-ranging interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a wide-ranging interview</a>. On the topic of head injuries, he said, &quot;the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion.&quot; And that was just the second question.</p><p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>Ben McAdoo</strong> may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is <strong>Eli Apple</strong> <a href="https://www.newsday.com/sports/football/giants/eli-apple-giants-steve-spagnuolo-1.15419596" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:tweeting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">tweeting</a> (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday&#39;s loss. Want the Giants&#39; 2017 in a sentence? &quot;Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets.&quot;</p><p><strong>9. </strong>Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/12/11/16760394/verizon-nfl-games-stream-football-1-5-billion" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watch local and national NFL games on your phone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watch local and national NFL games on your phone</a> as soon as January.</p><p><strong>10.</strong> Meet <a href="https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/yellowjackets-womens-football/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Austin Yellow Jackets" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Austin Yellow Jackets</a>, Texas&#39;s Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.</p><p><em><strong>Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage?</strong></em> <span><em>Let us know here.</em></span></p><h3><b>THE KICKER</b></h3><p>A week after <strong>Eli Manning</strong> was benched, another <a href="http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/12/scott-hanson-redzone-bathroom-break-streak-four-years-nfl-network" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:historic streak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">historic streak</a> came to an end.</p><p><strong>Question? Comment? Story idea?</strong><i> L</i><em>et the team know at <span>talkback@themmqb.com</span></em></p>
How Tom Savage's Concussion Should Have Been Handled

How was Tom Savage allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?

When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It's up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player's speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question.

Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of fencing response, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn't it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can't be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach Bill O'Brien intimated that head Houston trainer Geoff Kaplan had not seen the hit and Savage's reaction before making his diagnosis; O'Brien said Monday, "With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don't believe that Geoff Kaplan would have allowed that player back in the game." So maybe that's where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.

The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed.

Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet? Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle.

HOT READS

NOW ON THE MMQB: Conor Orr stacks up the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit studies the Steelers without Ryan Shazier ... Peter King hands out awards ... and more.

LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB: Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. Stay tuned.

PRESS COVERAGE

1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. With Rob Gronkowski suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference's top seed.

2. Carson Wentz had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on Twitter. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling explains what's in store for Wentz now.

3. During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end Zach Miller said he's undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He's not sure if he'll ever play football again; for now he's killing time playing Madden.

4. The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday's game, but that doesn't mean Pete Carroll is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ Carroll said Monday. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’

5. With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will offensive line instability, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?

6. The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they're still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, Jim Caldwell seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he deflected credit for Detroit's resiliency of late.

7. In Esquire, Richard Sherman gave a wide-ranging interview. On the topic of head injuries, he said, "the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion." And that was just the second question.

8. Ben McAdoo may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is Eli Apple tweeting (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday's loss. Want the Giants' 2017 in a sentence? "Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets."

9. Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to watch local and national NFL games on your phone as soon as January.

10. Meet the Austin Yellow Jackets, Texas's Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.

Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage? Let us know here.

THE KICKER

A week after Eli Manning was benched, another historic streak came to an end.

Question? Comment? Story idea? Let the team know at talkback@themmqb.com

<p>How was <strong>Tom Savage</strong> allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?</p><p>When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It&#39;s up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player&#39;s speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question. </p><p>Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1494620-stevan-ridleys-concussion-biomechanics-of-his-injury-fencing-response" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fencing response" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fencing response</a>, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn&#39;t it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can&#39;t be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach <strong>Bill O&#39;Brien</strong> intimated that head Houston trainer <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> had not seen the hit and Savage&#39;s reaction before making his diagnosis; O&#39;Brien <a href="https://twitter.com/AaronWilson_NFL/status/940235133415776259" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> Monday, &quot;With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don&#39;t believe that <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> would have allowed that player back in the game.&quot; So maybe that&#39;s where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.</p><p>The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed. </p><p><strong>Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet?</strong> <a href="https://www.si.com/static/newsletter/signup" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle</em></a><em>.</em></p><h3><strong>HOT READS</strong></h3><p><strong>NOW ON THE MMQB: </strong>Conor Orr <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/carson-wentz-torn-acl-injury-philadelphia-eagles?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stacks up" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stacks up</a> the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/ryan-shazier-injury-pittsburgh-steelers-replacements-patriots-game?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:studies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">studies</a> the Steelers without <strong>Ryan Shazier</strong> ... Peter King <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/week-14-awards-jaguars-fans-seahawks-player-mmqb?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hands out" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hands out</a> awards ... <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and more</a>. </p><p><b>LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB:</b> Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Stay tuned" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Stay tuned</a>.</p><h3><b>PRESS COVERAGE</b></h3><p><strong>1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. </strong>With <strong>Rob Gronkowski</strong> suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference&#39;s top seed.</p><p><strong>2. Carson Wentz </strong>had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on <a href="https://twitter.com/cj_wentz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&#38;ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.philly.com%2Fphilly%2Fsports%2Fcarson-wentz-twitter-torn-acl-philadelphia-eagles-rams-20171211.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Twitter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Twitter</a>. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/health/carson-wentz-acl-tear-recovery-time-philadelphia-eagles-20171212.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:explains" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">explains</a> what&#39;s in store for Wentz now. </p><p><strong>3.</strong> During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end <strong>Zach Miller</strong> <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/g00/sports/football/bears/ct-spt-bears-zach-miller-wiederer-20171211-story.html?i10c.encReferrer=" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> he&#39;s undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He&#39;s not sure if he&#39;ll ever play football again; for now he&#39;s killing time playing Madden.</p><p><strong>4. </strong>The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday&#39;s game, but that doesn&#39;t mean <strong>Pete Carroll</strong> is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/sports/seahawks/seahawks-coach-pete-carroll-on-end-of-game-melee-at-jacksonville-everybody-is-remorseful-we-dont-want-to-play-like-that/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carroll said Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carroll said Monday</a>. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’</p><p><strong>5.</strong> With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will <a href="http://www.startribune.com/vikings-suddenly-unstable-offensive-line-feels-all-too-familiar-no-early-speculation-on-riley-reiff-s-status/463496723/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:offensive line instability" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">offensive line instability</a>, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?</p><p><strong>6. </strong>The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they&#39;re still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, <strong>Jim Caldwell </strong>seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he <a href="https://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2017/12/11/detroit-lions-jim-caldwell-team-resiliency/942753001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:deflected credit" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">deflected credit</a> for Detroit&#39;s resiliency of late.</p><p><strong>7. </strong>In Esquire, <strong>Richard Sherman</strong> gave <a href="http://www.esquire.com/sports/a14323331/richard-sherman-nfl-protests-kaepernick-trump/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a wide-ranging interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a wide-ranging interview</a>. On the topic of head injuries, he said, &quot;the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion.&quot; And that was just the second question.</p><p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>Ben McAdoo</strong> may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is <strong>Eli Apple</strong> <a href="https://www.newsday.com/sports/football/giants/eli-apple-giants-steve-spagnuolo-1.15419596" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:tweeting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">tweeting</a> (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday&#39;s loss. Want the Giants&#39; 2017 in a sentence? &quot;Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets.&quot;</p><p><strong>9. </strong>Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/12/11/16760394/verizon-nfl-games-stream-football-1-5-billion" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watch local and national NFL games on your phone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watch local and national NFL games on your phone</a> as soon as January.</p><p><strong>10.</strong> Meet <a href="https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/yellowjackets-womens-football/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Austin Yellow Jackets" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Austin Yellow Jackets</a>, Texas&#39;s Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.</p><p><em><strong>Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage?</strong></em> <span><em>Let us know here.</em></span></p><h3><b>THE KICKER</b></h3><p>A week after <strong>Eli Manning</strong> was benched, another <a href="http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/12/scott-hanson-redzone-bathroom-break-streak-four-years-nfl-network" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:historic streak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">historic streak</a> came to an end.</p><p><strong>Question? Comment? Story idea?</strong><i> L</i><em>et the team know at <span>talkback@themmqb.com</span></em></p>
How Tom Savage's Concussion Should Have Been Handled

How was Tom Savage allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?

When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It's up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player's speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question.

Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of fencing response, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn't it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can't be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach Bill O'Brien intimated that head Houston trainer Geoff Kaplan had not seen the hit and Savage's reaction before making his diagnosis; O'Brien said Monday, "With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don't believe that Geoff Kaplan would have allowed that player back in the game." So maybe that's where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.

The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed.

Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet? Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle.

HOT READS

NOW ON THE MMQB: Conor Orr stacks up the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit studies the Steelers without Ryan Shazier ... Peter King hands out awards ... and more.

LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB: Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. Stay tuned.

PRESS COVERAGE

1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. With Rob Gronkowski suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference's top seed.

2. Carson Wentz had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on Twitter. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling explains what's in store for Wentz now.

3. During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end Zach Miller said he's undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He's not sure if he'll ever play football again; for now he's killing time playing Madden.

4. The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday's game, but that doesn't mean Pete Carroll is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ Carroll said Monday. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’

5. With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will offensive line instability, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?

6. The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they're still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, Jim Caldwell seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he deflected credit for Detroit's resiliency of late.

7. In Esquire, Richard Sherman gave a wide-ranging interview. On the topic of head injuries, he said, "the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion." And that was just the second question.

8. Ben McAdoo may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is Eli Apple tweeting (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday's loss. Want the Giants' 2017 in a sentence? "Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets."

9. Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to watch local and national NFL games on your phone as soon as January.

10. Meet the Austin Yellow Jackets, Texas's Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.

Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage? Let us know here.

THE KICKER

A week after Eli Manning was benched, another historic streak came to an end.

Question? Comment? Story idea? Let the team know at talkback@themmqb.com

<p>How was <strong>Tom Savage</strong> allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?</p><p>When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It&#39;s up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player&#39;s speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question. </p><p>Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1494620-stevan-ridleys-concussion-biomechanics-of-his-injury-fencing-response" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fencing response" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fencing response</a>, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn&#39;t it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can&#39;t be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach <strong>Bill O&#39;Brien</strong> intimated that head Houston trainer <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> had not seen the hit and Savage&#39;s reaction before making his diagnosis; O&#39;Brien <a href="https://twitter.com/AaronWilson_NFL/status/940235133415776259" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> Monday, &quot;With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don&#39;t believe that <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> would have allowed that player back in the game.&quot; So maybe that&#39;s where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.</p><p>The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed. </p><p><strong>Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet?</strong> <a href="https://www.si.com/static/newsletter/signup" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle</em></a><em>.</em></p><h3><strong>HOT READS</strong></h3><p><strong>NOW ON THE MMQB: </strong>Conor Orr <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/carson-wentz-torn-acl-injury-philadelphia-eagles?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stacks up" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stacks up</a> the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/ryan-shazier-injury-pittsburgh-steelers-replacements-patriots-game?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:studies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">studies</a> the Steelers without <strong>Ryan Shazier</strong> ... Peter King <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/week-14-awards-jaguars-fans-seahawks-player-mmqb?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hands out" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hands out</a> awards ... <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and more</a>. </p><p><b>LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB:</b> Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Stay tuned" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Stay tuned</a>.</p><h3><b>PRESS COVERAGE</b></h3><p><strong>1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. </strong>With <strong>Rob Gronkowski</strong> suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference&#39;s top seed.</p><p><strong>2. Carson Wentz </strong>had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on <a href="https://twitter.com/cj_wentz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&#38;ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.philly.com%2Fphilly%2Fsports%2Fcarson-wentz-twitter-torn-acl-philadelphia-eagles-rams-20171211.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Twitter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Twitter</a>. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/health/carson-wentz-acl-tear-recovery-time-philadelphia-eagles-20171212.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:explains" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">explains</a> what&#39;s in store for Wentz now. </p><p><strong>3.</strong> During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end <strong>Zach Miller</strong> <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/g00/sports/football/bears/ct-spt-bears-zach-miller-wiederer-20171211-story.html?i10c.encReferrer=" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> he&#39;s undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He&#39;s not sure if he&#39;ll ever play football again; for now he&#39;s killing time playing Madden.</p><p><strong>4. </strong>The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday&#39;s game, but that doesn&#39;t mean <strong>Pete Carroll</strong> is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/sports/seahawks/seahawks-coach-pete-carroll-on-end-of-game-melee-at-jacksonville-everybody-is-remorseful-we-dont-want-to-play-like-that/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carroll said Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carroll said Monday</a>. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’</p><p><strong>5.</strong> With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will <a href="http://www.startribune.com/vikings-suddenly-unstable-offensive-line-feels-all-too-familiar-no-early-speculation-on-riley-reiff-s-status/463496723/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:offensive line instability" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">offensive line instability</a>, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?</p><p><strong>6. </strong>The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they&#39;re still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, <strong>Jim Caldwell </strong>seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he <a href="https://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2017/12/11/detroit-lions-jim-caldwell-team-resiliency/942753001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:deflected credit" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">deflected credit</a> for Detroit&#39;s resiliency of late.</p><p><strong>7. </strong>In Esquire, <strong>Richard Sherman</strong> gave <a href="http://www.esquire.com/sports/a14323331/richard-sherman-nfl-protests-kaepernick-trump/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a wide-ranging interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a wide-ranging interview</a>. On the topic of head injuries, he said, &quot;the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion.&quot; And that was just the second question.</p><p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>Ben McAdoo</strong> may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is <strong>Eli Apple</strong> <a href="https://www.newsday.com/sports/football/giants/eli-apple-giants-steve-spagnuolo-1.15419596" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:tweeting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">tweeting</a> (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday&#39;s loss. Want the Giants&#39; 2017 in a sentence? &quot;Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets.&quot;</p><p><strong>9. </strong>Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/12/11/16760394/verizon-nfl-games-stream-football-1-5-billion" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watch local and national NFL games on your phone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watch local and national NFL games on your phone</a> as soon as January.</p><p><strong>10.</strong> Meet <a href="https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/yellowjackets-womens-football/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Austin Yellow Jackets" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Austin Yellow Jackets</a>, Texas&#39;s Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.</p><p><em><strong>Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage?</strong></em> <span><em>Let us know here.</em></span></p><h3><b>THE KICKER</b></h3><p>A week after <strong>Eli Manning</strong> was benched, another <a href="http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/12/scott-hanson-redzone-bathroom-break-streak-four-years-nfl-network" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:historic streak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">historic streak</a> came to an end.</p><p><strong>Question? Comment? Story idea?</strong><i> L</i><em>et the team know at <span>talkback@themmqb.com</span></em></p>
How Tom Savage's Concussion Should Have Been Handled

How was Tom Savage allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?

When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It's up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player's speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question.

Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of fencing response, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn't it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can't be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach Bill O'Brien intimated that head Houston trainer Geoff Kaplan had not seen the hit and Savage's reaction before making his diagnosis; O'Brien said Monday, "With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don't believe that Geoff Kaplan would have allowed that player back in the game." So maybe that's where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.

The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed.

Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet? Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle.

HOT READS

NOW ON THE MMQB: Conor Orr stacks up the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit studies the Steelers without Ryan Shazier ... Peter King hands out awards ... and more.

LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB: Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. Stay tuned.

PRESS COVERAGE

1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. With Rob Gronkowski suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference's top seed.

2. Carson Wentz had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on Twitter. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling explains what's in store for Wentz now.

3. During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end Zach Miller said he's undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He's not sure if he'll ever play football again; for now he's killing time playing Madden.

4. The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday's game, but that doesn't mean Pete Carroll is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ Carroll said Monday. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’

5. With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will offensive line instability, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?

6. The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they're still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, Jim Caldwell seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he deflected credit for Detroit's resiliency of late.

7. In Esquire, Richard Sherman gave a wide-ranging interview. On the topic of head injuries, he said, "the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion." And that was just the second question.

8. Ben McAdoo may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is Eli Apple tweeting (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday's loss. Want the Giants' 2017 in a sentence? "Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets."

9. Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to watch local and national NFL games on your phone as soon as January.

10. Meet the Austin Yellow Jackets, Texas's Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.

Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage? Let us know here.

THE KICKER

A week after Eli Manning was benched, another historic streak came to an end.

Question? Comment? Story idea? Let the team know at talkback@themmqb.com

Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi
Scherma, Fencing Grand Prix Torino 2017 Trofeo Inalpi

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